Welcome Stranger to OCC!Login | Register

Operating Systems Article (0)

How To Install Windows 8 Guide

How To Install Windows 8 Guide

» April 3, 2013 05:00PM

How to Install Windows 7 Guide

How to Install Windows 7 Guide

» April 2, 2013 05:00PM

Windows 7 Beta Review

Windows 7 Beta Review

» February 22, 2009 05:00PM

Bootable USB drive guide

» October 6, 2006 05:00PM

How-to Dual Boot Windows XP and Fedora or Red Hat Linux

» February 25, 2004 05:00PM


Operating Systems News (36)

Microsoft's Windows 10 Meltdown Patch Had/Has Critical Vulnerability

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: May 7, 2018 08:50AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

This is likely a bit embarrassing for Microsoft, as security researchers discovered its patch for Windows 10 to protect against the Meltdown vulnerability itself had a vulnerability. The researchers discovered calling NtCallEnclave would return to the user space the full kernel page table directory. In other words, if that call is made the whole point of the mitigation was defeated.

As bad of news as this might be though, Microsoft is aware of the issue and apparently fixed it in the release of Windows 10 v1803, also known as the April 2018 Update which released a week ago. Those of you who installed the feature update will be fine, but the fix will need to be backported for older versions of the OS.

Source: BleepingComputer



Next Windows 10 Feature Update May Be Delayed Further

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: April 19, 2018 12:46PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Last week was supposed to see the release of Windows 10 1803, the next feature update, but as you may have noticed, it has not arrived yet. The reason is users on Microsoft Fast Ring of Windows Insiders were suffering BSODs, and obviously you do not want to launch an update that will cause crashes. Now it appears the Redstone 4 update, as it is codenamed, may be delayed even longer because users on the 17134 preview build have been experiencing issues with Settings. Apparently going in and trying to change your default applications will cause the Settings app to crash, and as the ability to change default applications is something many of us enjoy, Microsoft does not want it to go live. The question is if this can be fixed with a hotfix that would be installed at the same time as the new build, of if it will require a completely new build, which will then need fresh round of testing.

Source: WCCFtech



Microsoft Bringing Servicing for Windows 10 Versions 1511 and 1607 to an End April 10

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: March 27, 2018 11:48AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

The saying goes that all good things must come to an end, and on April 10 servicing support for Windows 10 version 1511 and general support for version 1607 will cease. The ending of support for 1511 was actually announced back in November, but with the date approaching it might be worth a reminder for some.

It is likely worth noting this should mostly only impact companies using the Enterprise edition, and not general customers. This is because the Home edition of Windows 10 does not allow feature updates to be deferred like the Enterprise edition, so it would be on a newer and still supported version of the operating system. For those who are on one of the older versions and need continued servicing of, it is possible to pay for supplemental servicing for twelve months.

Source: Microsoft TechNet



Microsoft Changes Feature Update Model for Faster Installation

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: March 20, 2018 06:10AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Installing updates on Windows is often treated as a joke because of the many times it can require, or insist, on a restart and how long the process can take. In an effort to tackle the latter for feature updates, like the Creator's Updates Windows 10 has received, Microsoft has shifted parts of the update process around to reduce the amount of 'offline' time, which is the time the computer cannot be used by the user, bringing the average offline time down to 30 minutes, compared to the Creator's Update average of 82 minutes and Fall Creator's Update average of 51 minutes.

As explained at the source link, there are multiple steps involved with installing feature updates, and some of these are done in the background while the user is working and others are done when the operating system is not running. Under the older model steps such as migrating user content and placing the new operating system into a temporary working directory were done during the offline phase, but with the new model these tasks are done in the online phase. This means the online phase will be longer, but as the processes involved run at a low priority in the background, neither performance nor battery life should be impacted much. The result is still less disruption to the user's work as the offline time will be significantly less than it has been before.

Source: Microsoft



S Mode Coming to All Editions of Windows 10

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: March 8, 2018 10:02AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Everyone uses computers in their own way, and while some of us need deep control over our rig, others are happy with less power over the system. To better target the latter group, Microsoft developed Windows 10 S and launched it last year. This version of Windows 10 only uses Microsoft-verified apps through the Microsoft Store, allowing the company to promise better security, but this version also offers more consistent performance, improved battery life, and faster boots. After receiving a lot of feedback on Windows 10 S though, the company has decided to change the approach, rather significantly.

In an upcoming update, all versions of Windows 10 will have S Mode as an option. If you want to use Windows 10 Home or Pro with S Mode you will be able to enable it, but also if you do not like it, you will be able to switch out of it with no charge. This might be interesting to see how it works, especially for those out there who might benefit from the more tightly controlled operating system (or those who have to fix another's computer).

Source: Windows Blog



Microsoft Working to Accelerate Windows Updates

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: February 27, 2018 08:59AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

For a long, long time Windows Updates have probably proven to be a source of annoyance for many of us with the time they take to install and the need to restart the computer. Microsoft does want to do something about that, which is why it has already made changes to reduce download times, but now we know the developers are also working to speed up installs. This news comes from a tweet by Windows Insider chief Dona Sarkar, as the dev team is being pushed to make this happen. How this is being achieved or when we might see the results of the effort is not yet known, but hopefully, it will not take long.

Source: Windows Central



Microsoft Reveal Ultimate Performance Power Policy for Windows 10 Pro

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: February 16, 2018 09:50AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Like many developers leading up to a major update, Microsoft has been revealing more information about what is coming in the Redstone 4 update for Windows 10, which might be named the Spring Creators Update. The changes recently revealed include updates to Emoji, the ability to control Windows App file system access, and an Ultimate Performance mode for Windows 10 Pro for Workstations. The UWP file access control means you will be able to enable or disable all or specific applications from accessing the all of the files on your system. The Ultimate Performance mode is obviously the most interesting of these three changes, so it can have its own paragraph.

The Ultimate Performance mode is a new power plan that should go beyond High Performance, specifically to reduce or eliminate micro-latencies. The description in the blog post reads to me that over the years, Microsoft has developed many power tuning methods to balance performance and efficiency, and these are still in play even with High Performance. Ultimate Performance removes these "fine grained power management techniques" that were introducing the micro-latency, which should improve the performance for some workloads. It is currently not available on battery powered systems, because of how it may draw more power.

The post does have Ultimate Performance as a feature specifically for Windows 10 Pro for Workstations, along with a change to what tiles are presented in the Start Menu by default, so this may or may not come to the consumer versions of Windows 10.

Source: Windows Blogs



Spring Creators Update Apparently the Name for Next Windows 10 Major Update

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: February 6, 2018 10:15AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

In a number of ways Windows 10 differs from its predecessors and the way it receives new major updates is no exception. The operating system has a semi-annual release schedule for these updates, with the last being the Fall Creators Update. Based on some text in the February Bug Bush build for Windows Insiders, it appears the upcoming major patch will be the Spring Creators Update. This was found and shared via Twitter by Richard Hay who got a tip from user @WildDreamer95, but the name has since been changed by Microsoft to 'R4 update,' referencing the Windows 10 Redstone 4 codename for the update.

Source: TweakTown



Significant Security Flaw Found Impacting Intel CPUs and Possibly AMD and ARM Chips Too

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: January 3, 2018 04:22PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

This news is still pretty fresh and has been evolving, which is why there are six linked sources below. It has recently become public knowledge that a rather serious security flaw exists at least with Intel CPUs, but possible also AMD and ARM chips as well. The flaw can allow kernel memory information to be leaked to the user-space, which could allow, for example, one virtual machine to read the memory of the host or any other VM it is running. Clearly this is not good, but a solution is being developed for the open source Linux kernel. The Windows and macOS kernels also need to be patched, but the changes to these are not public. What makes this specific security issue even more interesting than what the flaw could allow attackers to do is the impact the solution, Page Table Isolation (PTI), will have at least on Intel CPUs. This is also where things start to get a bit more complicated.

The issue appears to stem from how a specific optimization method works, called speculative execution. As the name suggests, it has the CPU speculate what will need to be done next, so it will run a task before being asked to, removing or reducing delay. The flaw allows this to be abused to access memory that should not be accessible, as mentioned above. The PTI solution being developed for the Linux kernel is a software solution that will isolate the memory addresses, preventing this from being possible and is actually not a bad feature for kernels to have. Now we get to where it becomes a bit more complicated, as some are reporting Intel CPUs can see as much as a 30% performance decrease, resulting from this fix. What about AMD CPUs? This is the complicated part because while some are saying all modern CPUs are impacted by the issue, AMD has stated it is immune. The way its CPUs work already prevents speculative execution from accessing memory references it should not have access to. This means the PTI solution is unnecessary for AMD CPUs, so while using PTI can slow down AMD as much as Intel chips, it is not necessary on AMD systems. (The patch in the Linux kernel to not enable PTI on AMD CPUs might come after the PTI solution, but a nopti flag can be used to disable it regardless.) Some sources, including Google, which claims to have found the issue last year, and Intel are saying AMD and ARM CPUs are impacted by the flaw, so there are conflicting reports on this and only when the issue is completely revealed will we know for sure.

A 30% drop in performance is significant, but it is important to note this is not an across the board performance hit. Phoronix, which specializes in Linux coverage, is keenly pointing out this impact is felt most with I/O workloads, system calls, and other kernel interactions, which virtual machines will do a lot of, but something like gaming is unaffected. Phoronix also makes the point that the performance drop will be felt more with a system using fast NVMe drives than with traditional HDD storage, as the HDD storage may already be a bottleneck in the system.

As I stated earlier, this is still a developing story, but with such a significant potential performance impact, it has caught a lot of attention. It will take some more time and investigation for the whole story to be revealed, including if AMD is impacted, and how Microsoft and Apple will address the issue in their OS kernels.

Source: Google Security Blog, Linux Kernal Mailing List, Phoronix [1], [2], [3], and Python Sweetness



Microsoft Describes Upcoming Windows 10 Features Including 'Sets'

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: November 29, 2017 06:51PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

It was not long ago Windows 10 Fall Creators Update released, but as one should expect of any developer the size of Microsoft, the company is already working on things to come, and with the Windows Insider Program, normal consumers can try out some upcoming features. Recently two of these features were described in an email and Windows Insider blog post; Timeline and 'Sets.'

Timeline is what its name suggests visual timeline that will let you look back through files, applications, and sites you visited. If you do not remember what it was you had open earlier in the day, this is a way to find it without having to retrace your steps. The 'Sets' feature, which still needs a final name, is fairly different and has a video below on how it works. It allows you to open multiple, distinct applications in a single window as separate tabs, with each just a click away as you work. When you leave, this 'set' of applications can then be reopened on other computers even, thanks to cloud syncing.

If you are looking forward to testing out either of these features, it might be some time. At least Sets will not be rolling out to the entire Insiders community, allowing Microsoft to compare user behavior between those with and without the feature. Eventually everyone will get it, but the company wants that information first.

 

 

Source: Windows Insider Blog



Microsoft Discloses What Data is Collected by Windows 10

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: April 5, 2017 03:45PM
Author: Nick Harezga

As part of ongoing efforts to ease privacy concerns, Microsoft "is updating its privacy statement and publishing information about the data it collects as part of Windows 10." The Creators Update will allow users to switch between basic and full levels of collection. The company added that "we have published a complete list of the diagnostic data collected at the Basic level. We are also providing a detailed summary of the data we collect from users at both Basic and Full levels of diagnostics." Microsoft is continuing to update what it deems necessary to collect at the basic level.

Source: The Verge



Two Cumulative Updates Added to Windows 10 Creators Update

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: April 4, 2017 03:49PM
Author: Nick Harezga

Microsoft has added a pair of cumulative updates to it's upcoming Creators Update for Windows 10, expected to be publicly available on April 11. Build 15063.13 is already available for Windows Insiders in the Slow and Release Preview rings while build 15063.14 is also available for those in the Fast ring. The updates address issues with printer connections, Surface Pro 3 CPU usage, and process suspension. Microsoft also promised to make the Creators Update available tomorrow by manually downloading it through the Update Assistant if you can't wait until April 11.

Source: WCCF Tech



Windows 10 Creators Update Releasing April 11

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: March 29, 2017 02:16PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

In just shy of two weeks, on April 11, Microsoft will begin rolling out the Windows 10 Creators Update, a major update for Windows 10 that brings with it several improvements and new features. Among these is a Game Mode that is supposed to prioritize a game, granting it access to more system resources automatically. Also targeting gamers is the ability to use the Game Bar to start streaming to Beam without needing any additional log-ins. Beam is an ultra low-latency streaming service Microsoft acquired that is meant to enable streamers and viewers to interact in real-time.

Microsoft Edge is also getting updated with advanced tab management, allowing you to find, organize, and open tabs without leaving your current page. The browser will also be able to open eBooks from the Windows Store across all of your Windows 10 devices, and it will support 4K UHD Netflix streams of movies and TV shows. Screen time limits can be unified across the Xbox One and PC, so if you set up a time limit for a child they will be signed out from either device when time is up. The new Windows Defender Security Center is a single dashboard for controlling your different security options, viewing device health, and managing family safety options. You will be able to control your anti-virus, network and firewall protection, and set the security controls for your applications and browser from this one view. A new privacy dashboard will also let you see and manage your activity data across Microsoft services.

The Creators Update includes several other new features and updates, and they will all start rolling out on April 11.

Source: Windows Blog



Microsoft Working on Cloud Shell Version of Windows

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: January 26, 2017 04:25PM
Author: Nick Harezga

Microsoft described its intent to operate Windows 10 as a service at some point, "meaning the platform will receive frequent and substantial updates," perhaps with a monthly fee rather than one time cost. It now appears that this effort may take the form of something known as Cloud Shell, described as a "lightweight iteration of Windows designed for the modern computing world." The name of the new service seems to indicate a possibility that it might operate in the cloud and present users with a thin client, similar to what is available in some versions in Linux. Further details about the service are sparse at this time, but it appears that a release sometime in 2017 is possible.

Source: Petri



Windows 10 Surpasses Windows 7 in US

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: January 25, 2017 04:48PM
Author: Nick Harezga

Reports from StatCounter indicate that Windows 10 usage has finally passed Windows 7 in the United States, albeit by a very narrow margin. Windows 7 usage dropped from 26.66% to 26.56% while Windows 10 increased from 26.29% to 26.9%. Windows 7 still dominates globally with a market share of 48.34% while Windows 10 is far behind at 24.36%.

Source: MS Power User



Microsoft Bringing x86 Emulation to ARM64 Systems in Fall 2017

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: November 21, 2016 04:27PM
Author: Nick Harezga

A number of signs are pointing to Microsoft working on x86 emulation for ARM64 based systems, a feature that would allow native x86 applications to run on ARM64 systems. Indications are pointing to the feature being included in Redstone 3 for Windows 10 in Fall 2017. Windows 10 currently offers Continuum, which only allows users to run the Universal Windows Platform. A new bit of code was discovered that indicates that the feature has a new codename, CHPE, with the meaning of the full acronym remaining unknown. Sources indicate that the C stands for Cobalt, while speculation points to Hewlett Packard and E indicates emulation. HP was been "working increasingly closely with Microsoft on its Windows 10 PCs and the HP Elite x3 Windows Phone," and users of HP devices would likely benefit from running needed business applications on device rather than through remote software such as Citrix.

Source: ZDNet



Unified Update Platform Revealed for Windows 10 Devices

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: November 8, 2016 04:44PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Whether you love them, hate them, or are ambivalent to them, chances are you have had to deal with Windows updates before. Like any part of a piece of software, Microsoft has been receiving feedback about how Windows updates and are preparing a rather significant response to this. It is called the Unified Update Platform (UUP) and will bring several improvements some of you are probably going to appreciate.

Going on a brief tangent, I suspect many of you have hated how large some game updates can be, despite the changes not apparently needing so much stuff. In some cases this is because a patch cannot be compiled with only the changes as other assets also have to be included, even if they do not differ from what you already have. With the current system, this has also been true with Windows updates, but under the UUP users will be able to receive differential downloads with just the changes, instead of a full build. The estimate is that users could see download sizes decrease by about 35%, between major updates. This features is targeted for after the Windows 10 Creators Update, so it will be some time before we receive the benefits.

With UUP the means of checking for updates is also being tweaked to make it more efficient for the end user. For PC users this might not be too important, but for those running the Mobile OS, the reduction in data sent and local processing should help your battery life. This is thanks to having the service take on more of the responsibility. Also, the requirement to use two hops to complete an update is being addressed, allowing UUP to use a "canonical" build that only takes one installation.

While the roll out for UUP is going to take time, it has already started for mobile devices. Insiders on PC should see it later this year though, but the Windows Update behavior should not change for us. The improvements and optimizations the Unified Update Platform brings with it exist in the background so the end user should not notice anything on the surface.

Source: Windows Blog



Russian Hackers Exploiting Recent Windows Vulnerability

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: November 2, 2016 04:02PM
Author: Nick Harezga

Microsoft is reporting that the hacking group known as Strontium is among those actively exploiting the vulnerability recently disclosed by Google, with security researchers FireEye going as far as stating that the group is "most likely sponsored by the Russian government." Microsoft has reiterated that users of the latest version of Windows 10 and the Edge browser are safe, adding that users must have Adobe Flash installed to be vulnerable. It is believed that Strontium began exploiting this flaw with spearphishing, "a technique that involves targeting specific individuals with emails and other messages that seek to fool them into revealing their logins." The involvement of the Russian government cannot be proven at this time, and the country continues to deny any involvement though researchers claim that "the amount of circumstantial evidence is certainly mounting."

Source: BBC



Google Reveals Windows Exploit Before Microsoft Issues Patch to Fix It

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: November 1, 2016 03:32PM
Author: Nick Harezga

Google has revealed a critical security exploit that impacts Windows systems, ten days after informing Microsoft of the exploit. However, Microsoft has not yet issued a patch for the vulnerability which is described as "a local privilege escalation in the Windows kernel that can be used as a security sandbox escape." The vulnerability is being actively exploited which "means attackers have already written code for this specific security hole and are using it to break into Windows systems." Microsoft is not happy that Google revealed the exploit before it had a chance to fix it, with a spokesperson stating "We believe in coordinated vulnerability disclosure, and today’s disclosure by Google puts customers at potential risk." Executive VP of the Windows and Devices group Terry Myerson added that the vulnerability doesn't impact Windows 10 Anniversary Update users and that a fix is expected on November 8.

Source: Venture Beat



Microsoft Aware of Issue with Latest Cumulative Update for Windows 10

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: October 5, 2016 03:13PM
Author: Nick Harezga

Microsoft released KB3194496 to members of the Windows Insiders program last week. This fix is a Cumulative Update for Windows 10, and it appears that it has caused a significant issue for a "subset of users." These users have found themselves stuck in an install loop since the upgrade with no easy way out. The issue was apparently reported by some users before it was made publicly available, but Microsoft did not heed those warnings. The company has now acknowledged the problem and stated that it is working on a "clean-up script that will fix the underlying issue preventing the install."

Source: Neowin



Windows 10 Anniversary Update Could Take Three Months to Reach Remaining Users

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: September 14, 2016 04:13PM
Author: Nick Harezga

When Microsoft released the Windows 10 Anniversary Update on August 2, the company announced plans to do the update gradually. A recent e-mail sent out by Microsoft reads, "The Anniversary Update will download and install via Windows Update. The download is automatically available to you. It will begin rolling out on 2 August 2016 and may take up to 3 months to reach all users. Internet access fees may apply," meaning that some users may have to wait until November to get the update. Users that wish to force the update can do so through the Windows Update interface. The reasoning behind the extended rollout appears to be to allow Microsoft to fix issues as they come up without all users being impacted by them.

Source: ZDNet



Fix Found for Windows 10 Anniversary Update Breaking Some Webcams

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: August 22, 2016 09:49AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Recently Microsoft released the Anniversary Update for Windows 10, a major update that brings many changes, and as is so often the case with any software release, some new issues. The update apparently disables support for some webcams, causing the video streams to crash or freeze. It seems to be just for those webcams that use h.264 or MJPEG compression for their video streams. Fortunately someone has already found a possible solution. (I updated my laptop recently and its webcam was not affected, so I have not tested this fix.)

The solution involves editing the registry, so only if you are comfortable doing so should you try. Microsoft will release a patch for this, but it is only speculation when it may come. After opening the registry, navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows Media Foundation\Platform. In this folder add a new DWORD (32-bit) Value named 'EnableFrameServerMode' and give it the value 0. If you are running a 64-bit version of Windows, navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\WOW6432Node\Microsoft\Windows Media Foundation\Platform and add the same DWORD (EnableFrameServerMode with the value 0).

As is often the case with registry edits, you should probably restart your computer to make sure the changes take effect.

Source: WCCFtech



Google Developing New Operating System

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: August 15, 2016 03:01PM
Author: Nick Harezga

Google already has a pair of Operating Systems under its belt with Android and Chrome OS, and is now working on another known as Fuchsia. The new OS is being built from scratch and won't use the Linux kernel. Fuchsia is instead based on Magenta, a "medium-sized microkernel that is itself based on a project called LittleKernel, which is designed to be used in embedded systems." The fact that it is based on a microkernel doesn't mean it will lack in features as it is targeted at smartphones and personal computers with features such as a capability-based security model and graphics rendering already in place. It is unclear what the end game for Fuchsia is, with speculation including combining Android and Chrome OS, powering Internet of Things devices, or augmented reality interfaces. Users that want to get their hands on the code now rather than waiting for Google to release something officially can go to the company GitHub page.

Source: The Verge



Microsoft Will Skip Second Windows 10 Update for 2016

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: August 8, 2016 12:11PM
Author: Nick Harezga

Microsoft had previously announced that it would make two feature and maintenance updates per year for Windows 10, with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update the first for 2016. The company has quickly decided to abandon the twice yearly updates for this year, with the biannual updates set to resume in 2017. The decision to move the second update for this year to next year was made with "feedback from organizations moving to Windows 10." Windows 10 Insiders can expect preview builds of the next update sometime later this year.

Source: WCCF Tech



Windows 10 Breaks 20% Market Share

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: August 3, 2016 03:49PM
Author: Nick Harezga

Just over a year after its release, Windows 10 continues to gain traction in the desktop PC market. According to NetMarketShare, the newest OS from Microsoft can now be found on 21.13% of desktop PCs. The OS has seen its share of problems since release and just discontinued the free upgrade option for Windows 7 and 8 users. Windows 7 is still the leader with 47.01% of systems while versions of Windows 8 are at less than 10% and Windows XP is at 10.34%.

Source: Win Beta



Microsoft Pays $10,000 Judgement Over Unwanted Windows 10 Update

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: June 28, 2016 12:23PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Last year Microsoft released Windows 10 to the public, and users of many older versions of Windows have the option to freely update to the latest OS. Since about the beginning of the year, I have been running Windows 10 on both of my computers without issue, but not everyone has been so lucky with the upgrade. In Sausalito, California, for example, a woman's computer upgraded to Windows 10, without her approval, and after the upgrade failed, the computer she used to run her travel agency business became unstable to the point of being unusable. She did reach out to Microsoft's customer support, but after that failed to resolve the issues, she sued the company and won. Last month Microsoft decided to drop the appeal, and paid the $10,000 judgment intended to compensate the woman for lost wages and the price of a new computer. Microsoft cited avoiding the additional costs of continued litigation for why it halted the appeal, and is still denying any wrongdoing.

If you continue reading the Seattle Times article linked below, you will find other stories of issues with the Windows 10 upgrade process, as it has apparently become more aggressive of late. There is only about a month left before the free upgrade period ends, and it seems Microsoft wants as many people as possible to take advantage of this offer. The company's target is to have one billion devices running Windows 10 by the middle of 2018, but the current number is at around 300 million, so it has a way to go.

Source: Seattle Times



Windows 10 Anniversary Update June Bug Bash Has Begun

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: June 16, 2016 07:26AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

The time of the Windows 10 Anniversary Update is approaching, so naturally Microsoft has started a Bug Bash for the Windows Insiders on the Fast ring. For those who do not know, the Windows Insider program is a way for a user to get access to early builds of the operating system and its various components, so that you can provide feedback on what is coming, and report any issues you encounter. The Fast ring receives these pre-release updates the fastest of the public rings.

The new preview build, 14366 for the PC, has some 24 bug fixes in it, and two new things for the Windows Insiders to test. The two new things are Office Online for the Microsoft Edge browser, which will allow the Office Online extension to view, edit, and create Office files without having the larger software suite installed. The Windows Store has also received an update to improve its stability and performance. Among the bug fixes are changes to prevent displays from changing order and scaling, a fix for the French version occasionally reverting to English, and fixing Cortana search results to give a right-click context menu for .docx files.

A bug bash is a fairly common step ahead of a major software release, and the Anniversary Update is expected in July, and because the focus is on fixing issues, there will be few, if any new features added for some time now. If you choose to try out this preview build, which you can get through the Windows Update, Advanced Options page in Settings, you will be given Quests to complete. These are somewhat targeted directives meant to get the Windows Insider to explore the preview build, to make sure things are working properly, and to turn in feedback if things are not.

Source: Windows Experience Blog



Windows 10 Anniversary Update Available July 2016

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: April 13, 2016 04:23PM
Author: Nick Harezga

The Windows 10 Roadmap indicates that the Anniversary Update will be available sometime in July 2016 with a number of features that are currently being previewed in Windows 10 Insider Preview 14316. Some of the features include "updates to Windows Defender, support for external touch displays when using Continuum, new authentication methods that will help users unlock their PCs using their Windows Phone or Android devices, and improvements to Microsoft Passport." Also expected to be included in the update are changes to Cortana, the Microsoft digital assistant. Among the expected improvements to Cortana is "pulling reminder-relevant info from emails so you have the details at hand."

Source: WCCF Tech



Unix Command Line Coming to Windows 10

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: March 31, 2016 04:05PM
Author: Nick Harezga

Microsoft had been working on a Linux subsystem for running Android apps on Windows 10 mobile known as Project Astoria. The company decided to abandon the project in February but it appears that some of the features developed as part of the program will see the light of day in the Windows 10 Anniversary Update. Users will gain access to the bash shell, which was built for Windows using Linux kernel APIs implemented using the Windows NT API. Microsoft received some help from Canonical, which provided a system image of Ubuntu command line tools to run from the bash shell. As someone that prefers bash to the Windows Command Prompt, I feel this is an interesting development but I doubt it will cause me to use command line tools any more frequently on Windows.

Source: Ars Technica



Users Report Windows 10 Being Installed Automatically on Windows 7 Machines

Category: Operating Systems
Posted: March 14, 2016 03:45AM
Author: Brentt Moore

It was reported late last year that Microsoft was modifying user settings for Windows 7 and Windows 8 to ensure that the Windows 10 upgrade notification was always present, and it also changed the Windows Update status of the upgrade from optional to recommended. Just last week, Microsoft placed an advertisement generator within an Internet Explorer update that told users about upgrading to Windows 10 in newly opened tabs. Now, users over on reddit are reporting that their Windows 7 machines are automatically being upgraded to Windows 10 without their explicit permission. Terry Myerson, the head of the operating system group at Microsoft, warned users back in October that this would happened due to certain Windows Update settings, but users still aren't satisfied with Microsoft's efforts. Fortunately for users who happened to have the latest Windows operating system installed without their permission, they have 30 days to downgrade to a previous version of Windows. It is recommended that users double check their Windows Updates that are selected to be installed before proceeding with installation, as one of them likely controls the upgrade to Windows 10.

Source: Softpedia



Random Pic
© 2001-2018 Overclockers Club ® Privacy Policy
Elapsed: 0.5005040169   (xlweb1)