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CPU's Article (28)

AMD Ryzen 3 1300X & Ryzen 3 1200 Review

AMD Ryzen 3 1300X & Ryzen 3 1200 Review

» October 17, 2017 04:00PM

Intel 8th Generation Core i7 8700K & Core i5 8400 Review

Intel 8th Generation Core i7 8700K & Core i5 8400 Review

» October 4, 2017 04:00PM

Intel Core i9 7980XE & Core i9 7960X Review

Intel Core i9 7980XE & Core i9 7960X Review

» September 24, 2017 04:00PM

Intel Core i9 7900X & Core i7 7740X Review

Intel Core i9 7900X & Core i7 7740X Review

» July 25, 2017 04:00PM

AMD Ryzen 5 1600X & 1500X Processor Review

AMD Ryzen 5 1600X & 1500X Processor Review

» April 10, 2017 04:00PM


CPU's News (475)

Intel Releases Microcode Update for Skylake CPUs Protecting Against Spectre

Category: CPU's
Posted: February 8, 2018 08:12AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

At the beginning of the year the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities were revealed to the public, along with the efforts of various companies to patch the issues. This patching effort has continued ever since and now Intel has announced it released production microcode updates to its industry partners and OEM customers. This microcode will be used to create firmware updates for the Skylake platform. The microcode updates for other platforms are still in beta, allowing for additional testing for being ready for production release. Intel stresses the importance of keeping your system up to date to keep it safe from malicious attacks, such as these side-channel attacks.

Remember it was very recently revealed that a number of attacks based on Spectre and Meltdown have been showing up. While these malware samples are still young, they exist because people are trying to discover how to exploit the vulnerabilities.

Source: Intel



Intel CPUs Outselling AMD at German E-Tailer Mindfactory.de

Category: CPU's
Posted: February 6, 2018 01:21PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

When AMD launched its Ryzen processors last year, they were recognized as a return of competition to the CPU market, which Intel had long dominated. This led to AMD actually outselling Intel as people sought the high thread count at affordable prices, but it appears AMD's reign has ended, at least at one e-tailer. Mindfactory.de is Germany's largest online retailer and has been sharing its sales data, which is how we know AMD got ahead of Intel, and now the data shows Intel ahead again at 58% to AMD's 42%. While Intel has represented the majority of sales now, there are some important points to the data's context.

Perhaps the most important piece of contextual information is the upcoming launch of the Ryzen 2000 series based on the Zen+ architecture. As promising and powerful as the Zen architecture proved to be with the Ryzen 1000 series of CPUs, there are a number of improvements expected and already announced for its successor, including support for faster RAM. Those following news from AMD are likely holding off on CPU purchases until the Ryzen 2000 series and accompanying x470 chipset release. Another point WCCFtech makes, that is rather interesting to me at least, is AMD's dominance in between the HEDT platforms. While the Ryzen Threadripper/x399 platform is not exactly cheap compared to the entry-level Intel HEDT parts, it offers many useful features, like 64 PCIe lanes off the CPU and better price-per-core than Intel's higher core count chips.

Time will tell how long this sales lead will last, and the Ryzen 2000 series and x470 platform is expected to launch in April.

Source: WCCFtech



EPYC Installed in TR4 Socket with Some Success

Category: CPU's
Posted: January 29, 2018 10:36AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Since before its launch even, the Threaderipper HEDT CPUs from AMD have been of great interest for the power and features the platform offers, and their similarities to AMD's EPYC processors. For example, both Threadripper and EPYC show four Zeppelin dies if you remove the heat spreader, as der8auer did back in September. Even before his video, there were some speculating if Threadripper and EPYC CPUs, with their similar TR4 and SP3 sockets, could be installed in systems meant for the other. Now der8auer is at it again, actually installing an EPYC CPU in the ASUS Zenith Extreme x399 motherboard, and showing the results in a YouTube video.

As this was only meant as a test, der8auer did not install a CPU cooler or even a GPU, but thanks to the motherboard's built-in OLED screen he could still watch for what the system was doing. Initially the system would not boot with EPYC, but after covering what appears to be an ID pin, distinguishing EPYC and Threadripper processors, the system actually powered up. If you are hoping to see a 32 core/64 thread EPYC in a consumer motherboard though, the success is limited. The system consistently crashes when while checking the memory, but der8auer speculates a proper EPYC BIOS could make this viable, though to a point.

While it might become possible to fully boot up EPYC on a TR4 motherboard, two of the dies will suffer from very high latencies because they will not have direct access to RAM. Each Zeppelin die has its own memory controller supporting dual-channel memory setups, and with Threadripper having two active dies, it supports quad-channel, while EPYC with four dies supports eight-channel memory. With TR4/x399 being a quad channel platform, two of the EPYC dies would need to go through the other dies to access memory, resulting in a latency penalty.

 

 

Source: der8auer YouTube



Possible Ryzen 2600 CPU Appears on SiSoftware Website

Category: CPU's
Posted: January 18, 2018 07:36AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

From AMD's pre-CES 2018 event we know the next generation of Ryzen CPUs will be launching in April. These processors will feature the more refined Zen+ architecture and will be manufactured on a 12 nm process that should offer improved performance over the current 14 nm parts. With release coming soon, we are starting to see some information leak out and what we have here is a listing on the SiSoftware website for the AMD Ryzen ZD2600BBM68AF_38/34_Y.

While the ID does have 2600 right at the beginning, this is not necessarily the successor to the Ryzen 5 1600, though it does also offer 6 cores/12 threads. According to the site, the CPU has a speed of 3.4 GHz, and looking at the ID number it would seem the boost speed might be 3.8 GHz. This CPU is possibly an engineering sample so we could see different clock speeds in the final product.

In addition to revealing this CPU, the SiSoftware information also identifies the ASUS ROG Crosshair VII Hero, the likely x470 successor to the x370 ROG Crosshair VI Hero. No specific information is offered on this, except that it too exists in a state ready for testing but as April approach, more information is sure to appear for more second-generation Ryzen CPUs and x470 motherboards.

Source: SiSoftware



Intel Launches Core Processor with Radeon Vega GPU for Mobile and NUC

Category: CPU's
Posted: January 8, 2018 01:14PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*


It was back in November when both AMD and Intel revealed a partnership bringing Radeon graphics to Intel CPUs in a single package, probably few expected. Now the combined unit has been launched offering an 8th Gen Intel Core process with Radeon RX Vega M GL or GH graphics. The version with the Vega M GL graphics sports 65 W of total package power while the GH version can go up to 100 W and can come in an unlocked configuration. Both GPUs have 4 GB of HBM2, which is connected to the GPU by Intel's EMIB technology. Being Radeon graphics,

Looking at the product overview PDF Intel has up, there will apparently be a total of five products: the i5-8305G; i7-8705G; i7-8706G; i7-8709G; and i7-8809G. The 8305G to the 8706G are all combined with the Vega M GL graphics, which has 20 compute units, a base clock of 931 MHz and a boost clock of 1011 MHz. The 8709G and 8809G get the Vega M GH with its 24 CUs, 1063 MHz base clock and 1190 MHz boost. Looking at the specs of the CPUs, all of them are 4 core/8 thread with support for dual channel DDR4-2400 RAM. The i5-8305G has a base clock of 2.8 GHz while all of the i7 CPUs have the same 3.1 GHz base. The i5 can boost up to 3.8 GHz while the i7s all boost to 4.1 GHz or 4.2 GHz. Differentiating the i7-8705G and i7-8706G appears to be Intel vPro support and between the i7-8709G and i7-8809G it is the 8809G that is fully unlocked.

We can expect these CPU+GPU packages to be available in Dell and HP lightweight 2-in-1s, but also a new Intel NUC, formerly called Hades Canyon. There are two versions of the Intel NUC with one (the NUC8i7HVK) sporting the Core i7-8809G while the other (the NUC8i7HNK) will use the Core i7-8705G. Both NUCs have dual USB-C Thunderbolt 3 ports, dual Gigabit Ethernet ports, and can drive up to six monitors between the Thunderbolt, two mini DisplayPort, and two HDMI ports. One of the HDMI ports is located on the front of the NUC, making it easier to connect a VR headset. Both NUCs will be available starting this Spring.

Source: Intel [1] and [2]




AMD Reveals and Announces New Products Before CES 2018: APUs

Category: CPU's
Posted: January 8, 2018 11:50AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*


With the pre-CES 2018 Ryzen CPUs announcements and reveals from AMD already covered, time to look at the APU news.

These APUs combine the Zen CPU and Vega GPU architectures into a single package with Infinity Fabric uniting it all, providing a single control and data interface for the entire SOC. The Ryzen 7 2700U and Ryzen 5 2500U mobile processors are already available in some devices, and this quarter systems running Ryzen 3 mobile processors are expected to launch. The Ryzen 3 2300U sports 4 cores/4 threads with a base clock of 2.0 GHz and boost of 3.4 GHz, along with 6 Vega CUs. The Ryzen 3 2200U features 2 cores/4 threads with a base clock of 2.5 GHz and boost of 3.4 GHz, combined with 3 Vega CUs. All of these Ryzen Mobile APUs have a 15 W Nominal TDP.

I believe since Ryzen launched a year ago, it has been known desktop-targeting Ryzen APUs were coming, and now we have details on two of them. The Ryzen 5 2400G has 4 cores/8 threads, a 3.6 GHz base clock and 3.9 GHz boost clock, and is combined with 11 Vega CUs. The Ryzen 3 2200G features 4 cores/4 threads with a base clock of 3.5 GHz and boost of 3.7 GHz, and is has 8 Vega CUs. The 2400G will cost $169 while the 2200G comes in at just $99. Both APUs have a CTDP of 45-65 W. Among the many slides is one showing the 2400G surpassing the $199 Intel Core i5-8400 and matching the i5-8400 when combined with the $89 NVIDIA GT 1030 in 3DMark Time Spy. The i5-8400 also has a 65 W TDP, and the GT 1030 has a 30 W TDP. The desktop Ryzen APUs are to be available February 12.

Also shown across a number of slides are various power features, allowing the APUs to be more efficient by controlling the frequency and voltage of each core, and enhanced gate states. This means the chips can enter and exit lower power states very quickly. Also the SOC elements have been organized into power gating regions with Infinity Fabric for even greater efficiency.

Source: AMD and Slide Decks




AMD Reveals and Announces New Products Before CES 2018: CPUs

Category: CPU's
Posted: January 8, 2018 11:03AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*


Before CES 2018 started, AMD held an event and showed off a lot of what is coming. To hopefully keep it all easier to read, I am breaking it apart into three news items, with this first one focusing on the CPU announcements. The other two will focus on the APU and GPU announcements.

First up, there have been rumors for a bit now that the Ryzen refresh would be coming early this year, and now we know the Ryzen 2000 series of desktop processors will be launching in April. This new series is based on the Zen+ architecture and will be manufactured on a 12LP process (12nm). This new process enables 10+% better performance compared to the current 14LPP process (14 nm) used and has optimizations to improve performance per watt. AMD SenseMI technology has also been improved, to provide better performance and power efficiency, such as Precision Boost 2 and XFR 2. The X470 chipset will also be released in April, with its optimizations for Ryzen 2000 series CPUs and lower power usage. As these CPUs will still use the AM4 socket though, current motherboards can support them with a BIOS update. For those of you who like the AMD Wraith CPU coolers, the Wraith Prism was also shown off, with its direct contact heat pipes, switchable overclock fan profile, rainbow RGB ring, illuminated fan blades and "dark mode for RGB heathens."

Ahead of the Ryzen 2000 launch, many Ryzen 1000 series products are seeing their suggested prices cut, and by many I mean all but the top two Threadripper CPUs, the 1950X and 1920X, and the lowest Ryzen 3 1300X. The third Threadripper CPU, the 8 core/16 thread 1900X has its SEP drop from $549 to $449, which means you can get this CPU with 64 PCIe lanes and quad-channel memory support for less than the Ryzen 7 1800X's original SEP. All of the Ryzen 7 CPUs have also seen their prices drop, with the 1800X going to $349 (was $499), the 1700X is $309 (was $399), and the 1700 is now $299 (was $329). The 6 core/12 thread Ryzen 5 1600X and 1600 are going to cost you $219 and $189 respectively (previously $249 and $219) while the 4 core/8 thread 1500X is going to be $174 (was $189).

Also appearing on the Ryzen roadmap are the 2nd generation Threadripper CPUs, but sadly there is no information beyond that release window. Perhaps even more interesting than this though is a slide showing the x86 roadmap for AMD that shows the status of both Zen 2 and Zen 3. According to this, Zen 3 is on track and will use a 7 nm+ process node, while Zen 2 will be on a 7 nm process and its design is complete. My guess is there will continue to be refinements to Zen 2 until sampling starts in the future, but its design is complete and "improves on Zen in multiple dimensions."

 

 

Source: AMD and Slide Decks




Leaked Slide Show AMD Ryzen APUs with Higher TDP and More Powerful GPU

Category: CPU's
Posted: December 14, 2017 07:39AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

At the end of October, AMD finally revealed its Ryzen Mobile APUs, the Ryzen 7 2700U and Ryzen 5 2500 U, which have already started appearing in products. With the 'U' at the end, many considered these to be the low power parts, which meant parts with higher TDP and higher performance were still to come, and these parts are what the latest leaked slides show. Naturally this is all still rumor and purportedly leaked slides cannot always be trusted.

According to the slide, there will be new Ryzen 5 2400G and Ryzen 3 2200G processors, both sporting a 65 W TDP, though 35 W versions will be available. The 2400G will have 4 cores/8 threads and Vega 11 graphics (11 Vega compute units) while the 2200 G will have 4 cores/4 threads and Vega 8 graphics. Another APU identified on the slides was the Ryzen 3 2300U, which would come in under the already out APUs and only has Vega 6 graphics.

Also discovered recently, but from the SiSoft database and not a leaked slide, was what appears to be a desktop-targeting APU with 28 Vega compute units. VideoCardz identifies this specific chip as a 4 core/8 thread APU with the codename 2G11SRD1P4MF6_30_N.

Source: VideoCardz



AMD Ryzen 2 Updates and Hoax Exposed

Category: CPU's
Posted: December 11, 2017 09:03AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

As the end of the year comes, the expectations for what next year will bring are only growing, including for AMD's second generation Ryzen processors. While a fake product slide recently made its way around, another image has been found and it seems a bit more reliable. The image originally came from moepc.net and appears to be a picture from a conference or press event, with AMD showing its full Ryzen roll out to Q2 2018. One of the products it shows is second generation Ryzen, and its position seems to suggest it may launch in Q1. This would align with other rumors and leaks giving a February or March launch. More premium mobile processors are also shown, including Ryzen 3 Mobile APU, Ryzen 5 and 7 marked for gaming, and Ryzen Mobile APU Pro.

The fake slide I mentioned before looked official but the specs made it somewhat suspicious. According the slide, the next round of consumer Ryzen processors would sport up to 12 cores and base clock speeds from 4.0 GHz to 4.6 GHz, boosting to as much as 5.1 GHz. The highest of these, the 2800X, was supposed to cost just $449. Wccftech reached out to its contacts about the slide, studied it closely, and tried to find an original source for it and all of these efforts pointed to it being fake.

More realistically, second generation Ryzen is expected to have some amount of IPC uplift, but what performance boost it offers is more likely to come from moving to a more refined and optimized 12 nm process node. The current 14 nm node used to create current Ryzen products was originally designed for more energy efficient and slower processors, which contributes to why most seem to top out at 4 GHz. The new node could allow for higher clock speeds, but until we see actual products, or product slides, it is impossible to know.

Source: Wccftech [1] and [2]



Multiple Vulnerabilities Found in Intel Security Firmware

Category: CPU's
Posted: November 22, 2017 09:23AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Modern processors do far more than just run the programs we ask them to, and one example of the extra work they do is to run security checks, making sure only the code the user wants is being executed. Intel has multiple systems built into its CPUs to that end, including the Management Engine, Trusted Execution Engine, and Server Platform Services, all of which the company has now acknowledged have flaws. These flaws could allow successful attackers to impersonate these systems, and as these systems exist as within the CPU as separate processors and firmware, arbitrary code could be executed without either the user or the operating system being aware. These flaws have earned a severity rating from Intel of Important, which is only surpassed by Critical that indicates the remote execution of malicious code without user action. At least this would suggest these flaws cannot be exploited remotely.

These flaws have been found following an internal audit of these technologies after external researchers discovered one of them in the Intel Management Engine (IME) firmware. As ZDNet points out, IME has been such a concern, as its firmware cannot be inspected by any outside of Intel, that Google built its own system called the Non-Extensible Reduced Firmware (NERF) to manage Chromebooks. NERF uses a different operating system (Linux instead of MINIX) and removes various elements from IME, such as its web server, IP stack, EUFI drivers, and its ability for IME and EUFI to self-reflash firmware.

Affected products include 6th, 7th, and 8th generation Core processors, the Xeon E3-1200 v5 and v6 family, Xeon Scalable family, Xeon W family, Atom C3000 family, the Apollo Lake Atom E3900 series, Apollo Lake Pentium, and Celeron N and J series processors. New firmware is being created and deployed by system manufacturers to fix these flaws, and Intel has released a detection tool for Windows and Linux to identify these vulnerabilities. You can find the tool and links to manufacturer support pages through the Intel source.

Source: Intel and ZDNet



Improved Ryzen CPUs Might Launch in February 2018

Category: CPU's
Posted: September 27, 2017 07:10AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

This would very much be classified as a rumor currently, but it is still an interesting one. According to Digitimes, citing motherboard manufacturers as its sources, we may see improved versions of the Ryzen CPUs from AMD launch in February. These new processors would be built on GlobalFoundries' 12 nm process, which would offer some improvements over the current 14 nm process. The codenames for these processors are Pinnacle 7, Pinnacle 5, and Pinnacle 3, following the same pattern as Ryzen 7, 5, and 3 for targeted markets.

Following shortly these CPUs would be the release of the 400 series chipset, with X470-based and B450-based motherboards coming in March. AMD has previously stated it will be sticking with the AM4 socket for multiple CPU generations, so if these rumors are true, current motherboards would be able to accept these new CPUs and the new motherboards would be able to take the current CPUs.

Of course, rumors are just rumors.

Source: Digitimes



Threadripper CPU Opened and Dies Examined

Category: CPU's
Posted: September 15, 2017 11:21AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

At this point, if you have been following what AMD has been doing with its CPUs, you may know the entire stack of CPUs, from Ryzen 3 to Threadripper and Epyc, are all using the same Zeppelin die, with binning deciding where the dies. Those Zeppelin dies feature eight cores between their two core complexes (CCXs), 32 PCIe 3.0 lanes, and dual-channel memory support. By disabling cores we get the six core and four core parts, but by leveraging Infinity Fabric, AMD is able to combine multiple dies to create the Threadripper and Epyc chips, with up to 32 cores, 128 PCIe 3.0, and eight-channel memory. Some quick math there shows the Epyc chips are using four Zeppelin dies, and with Threadripper having 16 cores, 64 PCIe lanes, and quad-channel memory support, it uses two dies. When it was discovered Threadripper chips are hiding apparently four dies under the IHS, there were questions about the status of those other two dies, so der8auer decided to take a (second) look on his YouTube channel.

Initially der8aurer had put up a video where he delidded a Threadripper to find these four dies, but was asked to take it down for a bit, as the chip he used was an engineering sample. Now he has a new video up because there have been some claims that two of those dies are 'dummies' and are just spacers, even blank silicon. This time, instead of just popping off the IHS, der8auer went further to remove the dies from the packaging and then remove layers from the die to see if there were circuits underneath.

It turns out those claims of the dummy or blank dies are apparently false, as all four dies der8auer pulled out did in fact have circuitry in them; they are not dummies. They are definitely disabled though and likely defective, because why would you waste a usable die or silicon?

 

 

Source: der8auer YouTube




AMD Launches 8-Core/16-Thread Ryzen Threadripper 1900X

Category: CPU's
Posted: August 31, 2017 12:47PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

A month ago AMD announced a third Ryzen Threadripper and today the 1900X has launched. This is an 8-core/16-thread HEDT CPU and has an MSRP of $549, which would make it more expensive than the 8-core/16-thread Ryzen 7 CPUs, but it has Threadriprer features the less expensive chips do not. For starters, the 1900X has 64 PCIe 3.0 lanes off of the chip, with 60 available for peripherals (the other four are reserved for the chipset). It also supports quad-channel memory and up to eight DIMM slots. The 1900X does have a higher base clock of 3.8 GHz than the higher core count 1920X (3.5 GHz) and 1950X (3.4 GHz) though, and a higher all-core boost of 3.9 GHz instead of 3.7 GHz.

The purpose of the 1900X is for content creators not wanting to or unable to spend the $799+ for the higher end CPUs, and not for people just looking to game. For that the Ryzen 7/5/3 processors are still what AMD recommends, and if you look at the source you will even find a graph that shows the R7 1800X beating the 1900X is a number of games. This difference in performance might be related to the different internal topologies. The Ryzen 7 chips are all comprised of two CCXes on a single die while the 1900X contains two dies with only one active CCX on each. That means communication from one 4-core/8-thread CCX to the other has a higher latency. You get higher inter-CCX latency but also more PCIe 3.0 lanes, more DIMM slots, and four DDR4 channels instead of two. Really comes down to what your expected workload will be.

Source: AMD



Intel Core X-Series Family Specs Officially Revealed

Category: CPU's
Posted: August 7, 2017 04:57PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*


Not too long ago a slide could be found around the Internet supposedly identifying the specs for all of Intel's Core X-Series CPUs. It looks like that slide was correct as Intel has now shared it with a press release about the upcoming launch its remaining HEDT processors, including the $1999, 18-core/36-thread i9-7980XE.

That top-end part has a base clock of 2.6 GHz with a boost clock of 4.4 GHz (via Turbo Boost Max 3.0). It also has 44 PCIe lanes off of the chip. In fact, all of the X-Series CPUs above and including the i9-7900X have 44 PCIe lanes, which are all $999+ chips. The Intel X299 chipset can add up to 24 PCIe lanes on top of that, for a total of 68. AMD's soon-to-release Threadripper HEDT CPUs though all have 64 PCIe lanes off of the CPU, and its top-of-the-line 16-core/32-thread Threadripper 1950X only costs $999.

The 12-core/24-thread i9-7920X will be available on August 28 for $1199 while the 14- to 18- core CPUs will be available starting September 25 for $1399 to the aforementioned $1999. The i9-7920X has a base clock of 2.9 GHz; the i9-7940X (14-core/28-thread) has a base clock of 3.1 GHz; and the i9-7960X (16-core/32-thread) has a base clock of 2.8 GHZ. All of these CPUs have a Turbo Boost 3.0 boost clock of 4.4 GHz, with the Turbo Boost 2.0 boost clocks are 4.2 GHz or 4.3 GHz.

Source: Intel



Release Dates and Third Ryzen Threadripper CPU Announced by AMD

Category: CPU's
Posted: July 31, 2017 05:25PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Along with launching the RX Vega GPUs yesterday, AMD also released announced the release dates for the two confirmed Ryzen Threadripper HEDT CPUs, and announced a third. The 16 core/32 thread Threadripper 1950X and 12 core/24 thread 1920X will be available on August 10, at their $999 and $799 respective prices, so it will not be long before the X399 TR4 platform launches.

Joining these two high-end parts is the Threadripper 1900X, which only has 8 cores and 16 threads. This matches the Ryzen R7 CPUs while being more expensive at $549, but it does have one Threadripper advantage some of you might like: 64 PCIe lanes. It may have fewer threads, but if you want or need those PCIe lanes for GPUs or other peripherals, you can get them on August 31.

The 1900X also features a base clock of 3.8 GHz, a boost clock of 4.0 GHz, and a TDP of 180 W.

Source: AMD



Full Specs of Intel Core-X Series Revealed

Category: CPU's
Posted: July 28, 2017 06:15PM
Author: scr4wl

A slide revealing the full specs of Intel's Core-X lineup has started appearing around the Internet. The slide, which has not been officially confirmed, contains specs on nine new chips from Intel. According to the slide we can expect to see Intel's flagship 18-core, 36-thread, i9-7980XE clocked at 2.6Ghz and supporting 44 PCIe 3.0 lanes. It appears as though the i9-7980XE will be capable of a 4.4Ghz boost frequency and is also equipped with a 24.75MB L3 cache. As we've come to expect from flagship Intel chips, the i9-7980XE will carry a hefty price tag of $1,999. A more reasonably priced, 6-core, i7-7800X comes clocked at 3.5Ghz with a $389 price tag.

Source: videocardz



CPU Engineer Leaves Intel After Twenty Years

Category: CPU's
Posted: July 24, 2017 07:49PM
Author: scr4wl

Long-term Intel CPU Engineer Francois Piednoel has recently tweeted that he will be leaving the company. In the tweet, Piednoel said, "I am informed my management that I do not wish to continue my employment at Intel. New adventures coming, very exciting!" Piednoel, who has worked for Intel for the past twenty years as a senior architecture engineer, was involved in the development of some of Intel's biggest CPU architectures. The list of projects he worked on includes Katmai, Conroe, Penryn, and Nahalem. Further, he also had a hand in developing SoC's in Sandy Bridge, Ivy Bridge, Haswell, Broadwell, Skylake, and Kaby Lake. While nothing is known what Piednoel will do now that he has resigned, there is no talk of him moving to AMD. In fact, according to this source, Piednoel has rejected that assumption.

Source: Tweaktown



Intel Preparing 6-Core Coffee Lake CPUs

Category: CPU's
Posted: July 19, 2017 07:45PM
Author: scr4wl

It is reported that Intel will release new 6-core CPUs, based on the Coffee Lake architecture, in a few months. On the high end, the i7 8700K should come in clocked at around 3.7GHz and provide a total of twelve threads when Hyperthreading is enabled. At 95W, the i7 8700K will have a much lower TDP than the Core i9 7800X and its TDP of 140W. Intel will be releasing an i7 8700 non-K series, which will be clocked at around 3.2GHz. The rumor mill is also suggesting that we will see 6-core CPUs in the i5 series, although Hyperthreading will be disabled.

It is also said that for the first time ever, Intel will be introducing pure mobile 6-core CPUs. As you can imagine, Coffee Lake mobile will have much lower clock speeds at around 2GHz, and a much lower TDP at 45W. Finally, it is also reported that we will see a Coffee Lake quad-core CPU featuring a 28W TDP and targeted at low power notebooks.

Source: Videocardz



Intel Calls AMD's Naples '4-Glued Together Desktop Dies'

Category: CPU's, OCC News
Posted: July 18, 2017 10:29AM
Author: scr4wl

Intel takes the offensive in its recent press workshop as it points out many of Naples, so called, shortcomings. Intel presented several slides explaining the downsides of AMD's recent offering, even going so far as to call it "4-Glued Together Desktop Dies." Intel further points out that Zen is AMD's first new architecture in six years and that AMD's new architecture will stick around for four. Intel was happy to compare its new Skylake-SP architecture to Naples, noting that Skylake-SP is 28 "true" cores. This seems to be somewhat reminiscent of the Core 2 Quad days, when Intel was combining dies to create multi-chip packages and AMD was producing a "true" quad-core chip.

As you would expect from slides coming from Intel, a lot of the information is pro-Intel and anti-AMD. That said, there is some good information about Intel's Skylake-SP architecture. The slides touch upon Skylake-SP's improved virtualization and VM performance, as well as it's improved SMT performance. As with the rest of the slides, Intel doesn't hesitate to point out that Skylake-SP has more than double the memory bandwidth, and close to double the PCIe bandwidth, of AMD's offering. Regardless of what Intel may say, I for one am glad to see AMD releasing some competition again.

Source: WCCFtech



AMD Reveals Some Threadripper and R3 Information

Category: CPU's
Posted: July 13, 2017 03:59PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

At long last AMD has finally released some specs for the upcoming Ryzen Threadripper and Ryzen R3 CPUs, which complete the Ryzen lineup at the top and bottom, respectively. The two R3 processors are 4-core/4-thread CPUs with the R3 1200 sporting a base clock of 3.1 GHz and a boost of 3.4 GHz, while the R3 1300X will have a base of 3.5 GHz and a boost of 3.7 GHz. The R3 CPUs will also be launching later this month on July 27, and as they use the AM4 socket they can installed in the already available A320, B350, and X370 motherboards.

For those looking for high end desktop (HEDT) CPUs, we not only have some clock speed information on the Threadripper processors but even prices and a release window. Starting at the top, the Ryzen Threadripper 1950X, with its 16 cores and 32 threads, will have a base clock of 3.4 GHz and a boost of 4.0 GHz. Its suggested retail price is just $999, matching Intel's 10-core/20-thread i9-7900X CPU (3.3 GHz base with 4.3 GHz boost under Turbo Boost 2.0 or 4.5 GHz with Turbo Boost 3.0). The 12-core/24-thread Threadripper 1920X has a base clock of 3.5 GHz and a boost of 4.0 GHz and will be priced at $799. The video embedded below also shares some performance numbers for these CPUs from Cinebench R15.

These two Threadripper CPUs will be available early August, and we will also be getting more details on them following the R3 launch later this month. Do not forget that at SIGGRAPH, also the end of this month, more information on Vega GPUs will be released as well.

 

 

Source: AMD



Intel Announces Release Dates for Upcoming Core i9 CPUs

Category: CPU's
Posted: June 12, 2017 01:45PM
Author: Nick Harezga

Intel announced its next generation Core i9 CPUs late last month, but didn't set a release date for all of the announced models. The company has now remedied that with release dates for the Core i9-7980XE 18 core, i9-7960X 16 core, i9-7940X 14 core, and i9-7920X 12 core CPUs. The 12 core model will be available first in August, with the 14, 16, and 18 core models hitting the market in October. These models join the i9-7900X and lower models that will be available sometime this month. The prices will range between $1199 for the 7920X to $1999 for the 7980XE, which puts these CPUs out of reach for most consumers. It will be interesting to see how much more performance users are able to achieve for the premium price tag.

Source: The Motley Fool



Intel Announces X-Series CPUs with Pricing Information

Category: CPU's
Posted: May 30, 2017 06:26AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*


Yesterday, we covered that Intel was planning to launch an 18 core/36 thread Core i9 CPU, and indeed the company has announced this behemoth, along with the rest of the X-series of CPUs. While we do not have launch dates for all of the processors yet, and many are just labeled as Q2 2017, we do have prices for the entire line. At the bottom of the pack, the four core/four thread Core i5-7640X will cost $242, while the four core/eight thread Core i7-7740X will be at $339. The six core/12 thread i7-7800X is not too much more expensive at $389, but then the eight core/16 thread i7-7820X jumps up to $599. This is more expensive than AMD's Ryzen 7 series that also features eight core/16 threads, but the i7-7820X has a base clock of 3.6 GHz, matching the Ryzen 7 1800X, and a boost clock of 4.3 GHz with Turbo Boost 2.0 or 4.5 GHz with Turbo Boost 3.0. The Ryzen 7 1800X only boosts to 4.0 GHz.

If you want more than eight cores/16 threads, there will be the i9-7900X that has a base clock of 3.3 GHz and boosts to 4.3 GHz under Turbo Boost 2.0 or 4.5 GHz under Turbo Boost 3.0. It will cost you $999, however. The i9-7900X is the last of the X-series we have much information on, with the higher-end parts only sharing core/thread counts and pricing. The Core i9-7980XE with its 18 cores and 36 threads is sitting at the top with a cost of $1999, while the 16 core/32 thread i9 7960X is at $1699. We do not yet know the pricing for AMD's 16 core/32 thread Ryzen Threadripper processors, but at least now we can see what it may most directly compete with. With 14 cores/28 threads, the i9-7940X will cost $1399 and the 12 core/24 thread i9-7920X will be just $1199.

As you can see, Intel has its X-series of processor set to stretch quite a range of markets, and each uses the same X299 chipset and LGA 2066 socket. You can check out the source links below for more information, especially the PDF with its charts.

Source: Intel [1] and [2] (PDF)




Intel to Launch Core i9-7980XE CPU With 18 Cores

Category: CPU's
Posted: May 29, 2017 10:20AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

It was not too long ago that AMD announced its upcoming Ryzen Threadripper HEDT CPUs with 16 cores/32 threads and now we are seeing reports that Intel is going to release an HEDT with 18 cores/36 threads named the Core i9-7980XE. This very high end part will be at the top of the new X-series processors that will apparently stretch from four cores to that huge 18 core offering, adding two cores with each step, according to Videocardz's sources.

All of these processors will use the X299 chipset and LGA 2066 socket, but they will not all have the same set of features. Only the 7820X and above will have Intel Turbo Boost Max Technology 3.0 and support up to four channel DDR4 2666 RAM. Naturally these CPUs will also have different TDPs, with some coming in at 165 W, others at 140 W, and the 7640X and 7740X (both quad-core parts) will be at 112 W.

The X-series is going to have new boxes as well, and according to a chart Videocardz put together, the 10 core/20 thread 7900X and lower CPUs will be launching in June, while the 12 core/24 thread 7920X will be launching in August. The higher end 7940X, 7960X, and 7980XE do not have a launch date specified yet. The chart also shows a range of base and turbo clock speeds, from 3.3 GHz/4.5GHz for the 7900X to 4.0 GHz/4.2 GHz for the 7640X. Check it out if you want to see where these CPUs will fall, but the top of the chart is lacking a lot of data currently.

Source: Videocardz



AMD Engineering Samples with 16 Cores/32 Threads Possibly Found

Category: CPU's
Posted: May 11, 2017 09:51AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

This is definitely in the 'rumor' column as someone appears to have found engineering samples of some as-yet unannounced AMD CPUs. Among them are two CPUs with 16 cores/32 threads with base clocks of 3.1 GHz and boost clocks of 3.6 GHz. These are labeled as the AMD Whitehaven platform and as they are first and second generation engineering samples, those clock speeds could increase by the time they release. There are a number of other CPUs mentioned, including some with just four cores and one with only two cores, but each supports SMT and therefore sports double the threads.

As the Videocardz source points out when it breaks down the numbering system for these CPUs, the two 16 core/32 thread chips are using a different socket than AM4 or SP3 (a server socket). There have been rumors previously that AMD is planning a separate X399 chipset targeting high end desktops (HEDT) that would also have a different socket. Allowing these rumors to have some truth to them, these may be CPU destined for that platform, and with a better-than 3 GHz clock speed, these could be some fairly powerful components. Only time will tell though.

Source: Videocardz



Intel Fixes Remote Vulnerability That Goes Back to 2008

Category: CPU's
Posted: May 2, 2017 03:11PM
Author: Nick Harezga

Intel has fixed a vulnerability in the Active Management Technology (AMT), Standard Manageability (ISM), and Small Business Technology (SBT) firmware versions 6 to 11.6, impacting processors going back to the Nehalem based Core i7. This allows attackers "to gain control of the manageability features provided by these products," which "means it is possible for hackers to log into a vulnerable computer's hardware – right under the nose of the operating system – and silently tamper with the machine, install virtually undetectable malware, and so on." AMT has direct access to the networking features of your computer, allowing this to be exploited remotely. It is believed that business and server systems will feel the most pain from this as these systems commonly have the impacted features enabled. Intel has published instructions on how to determine if you system has the features enabled, and you should be sure to check your system.

Source: The Register



AMD Planning BIOS Update to Fix Ryzen CPU Hangs

Category: CPU's
Posted: March 21, 2017 02:08PM
Author: Nick Harezga

AMD is planning to release a BIOS update to fix an issue in the Fused Multiply-Add (FMA3) code that is causing systems with a Ryzen CPU to hang. The company didn't provide details on what the specific issue was but stated, "We are aware of select instances where FMA code can result in a system hang. We have identified the root cause." The problem was first noticed using the Flops v2 benchmark, but it was also noted that "simple apps with basic user privileges can crash a Ryzen-based machine."

Source: Digital Trends



Ryzen 5 CPUs Announced by AMD with April 11 Availability

Category: CPU's
Posted: March 16, 2017 07:37AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*


Two weeks ago AMD released its Ryzen 7 CPUs targeting more performance-hungry enthusiasts and now it has announced the mainstream-targeting Ryzen 5 processors at a press event in China. While the Ryzen 7 line consists only of 8-core/16-thread processors, Ryzen 5 has both 6-core/12-thread and 4-core/8-thread options. The two 6-core CPUs are the 1600X and 1600 with base/turbo clocks of 3.6/4.0 GHz and 3.2/3.6 GHz respectively. The 1600X has a TDP of 95 W and a price of $249 while the 1600 has a TDP of 65 W and a price of $219. The two 4-core/8-thread CPUs are the 1500X and 1400 with base/turbo clocks of 3.5/3.7 GHz and 3.2/3.4 GHz respectively. Both have a TDP of 65 W while the 1500X will be priced at $189 and the 1400 will cost $169. All four Ryzen 5 CPUs are to be available on April 11.

Like with the Ryzen 7 CPUs, not all of the Ryzen 5 processors will come with a cooler. The Ryzen 5 1600X will be without a cooler while the 1600 and 1500X will come with the Wraith Spire. The Ryzen 5 1400 will come with the Wraith Stealth cooler.

While looking at other sources we can find some other pieces, more technical pieces of information about the Ryzen 5 CPUs. For starters, all of them still use two CCX modules, like the 8-core Ryzen 7 CPUs, but with individual cores disabled. To maintain symmetry between the modules, the 6-core 1600X and 1600 have a 3+3 design, with one core disabled in both modules, and the 4-core 1500X and 1400 are both 2+2. Also the 20 ºC temperature offset AMD confirmed the other day is going to be present on the 95 W TDP 1600X, but not the three 65 W TDP processors.

 

 

Source: AMD, Anandatech, and Reddit



AMD Releases Community Update on Several Ryzen CPU Concerns

Category: CPU's
Posted: March 14, 2017 08:58AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Since AMD released the Ryzen CPUs two weeks ago there have been a host of rumors and speculations trying to explain various issues reported in reviews and by people on the Internet. Now the company has released a statement on several of these concerns via a Ryzen community update.

The first topic tackled is if there is an issue with the Windows 10 thread scheduler, which is the part of the OS that decides what CPU core, physical or logical, runs a given thread, and is also what decides to shuffle threads around to other cores. There has been speculation the scheduler is degrading performance in some cases, but after investigating these claims AMD has concluded the thread scheduler is "operating properly for Zen" and the company does not believe there is an issue with the scheduler "utilizing the logical and physical configurations of the architecture." However it was also discovered that an outdated version of Sysinternals Coreinfo utility was producing incorrect topology data for Ryzen CPUs, but version 3.31 does provide correct results. Also, if you saw reports of significant performance differences between Windows 7 and Windows 10, AMD has concluded this is not related to scheduling differences but to the different software architectures of the operating systems.

The second topic addressed concerns temperature readings. Apparently the Ryzen 7 1700X and 1800X both carry a +20 ºC offset to the reported T Control (tCTL) temperature and the actual junction temperature. The purpose of the offset is to give all Ryzen processors a consistent fan policy, but it has also confused some temperature monitoring applications that failed to subtract the offset from the tCTL measurement. The Ryzen 7 1700 (non-X) is not affected by this as it does not have a tCTL offset.

AMD has also confirmed the recommendations to use the High Performance power plan offered in Windows 10. This turns off core parking, making idle CPU cores available for the thread scheduler and allows the CPU to alter its voltage and frequency states at the 1 ms intervals Ryzen supports, while Balanced may take longer as the software tries to participate in the power state changes. An update to optimize the power policy parameters for the Balanced plan is expected by the first week of April.

Finally, there have been reports of SMT (Simultaneous Multi-threading) reducing performance in some games. AMD's expectation is that games should generally see a neutral or positive benefit from SMT being enabled, and it has been tested in various titles. For those games that have been reported as performing worse, AMD suggests this indicates opportunities to improve the codebases of these games to better address the Zen architecture. Some simple changes have already been identified to improve how a game understands Zen's core/cache topology, and there should be a status update when these are ready.

Source: AMD



NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Benchmarks Leaked

Category: CPU's
Posted: March 6, 2017 04:01PM
Author: Nick Harezga

A round of benchmarks for the upcoming NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti have leaked on a Chinese website, with 3DMark tests being the focus. The posted benchmarks appear to have been run on an overclocked iteration of the card with a core clock of 2062MHz, from an estimated 1860MHz stock speed, and memory clock of 5702MHz. The scores posted showed significant improvements across three iterations of the Fire Strike test and one of Time Spy when compared to the GTX 1080 OC. The GTX 1080 Ti achieved scores of 31135 in Fire Strike (Perf.), 15093 in Fire Strike Extreme, 7362 in Fire Strike Ultra, and 10825 in Time Spy. The GTX 1080 was only able to manage scores of 23982 in Fire Strike (Perf.), 11457 in Fire Strike Extreme, 5708 in Fire Strike Ultra, and 7763 in Time Spy.

Source: Videocardz



More AMD Ryzen CPUs on the Way

Category: CPU's
Posted: March 3, 2017 02:36AM
Author: Nick Harezga

AMD just made a big splash in the desktop CPU market with the release of the Ryzen 7 yesterday, and it has now announced the next additions to the Ryzen lineup. First up are the Ryzen 5 1500X and 1600X with four and six Zen cores, respectively. The 1500X will have a base clock of 3.5GHz and a boosted clock of 3.7GHz. The 1600X has a base clock of 3.6GHz and a boosted clock of 4.0GHz, giving it the same clocks with less cores as the 1800X. AMD didn't give exact pricing information on either chip, but did state that Ryzen 5 would cost between $199 and $299, making the 1600X a great alternative to the 1800X for users that don't need the extra cores. Further down the line is the Ryzen 3 which is expected to utilize four cores at a price below $200, putting it in competition with the Intel i3 lineup. Ryzen 5 chips are expected to be available between April and June of this year while Ryzen 3 is expected in the second half of the year.

Source: WCCF Tech



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