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XFX RX 460 4GB Slim Single Review

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XFX RX 460 4GB Slim Single Testing:

Finding out just how much gaming FPS performance XFX's RX 460 4GB Slim SIngle can deliver will consist of running it and comparison cards through the OverclockersClub.com suite of games and synthetic benchmarks. This will test the performance against many popular competitors. Comparisons will be made to cards of a range of capabilities to show where each card falls on the performance ladder. The games used are some of today's newest and most popular titles, which should be able to provide an idea of how the cards perform relative to each other.

The system specifications will remain the same throughout the testing. No adjustments will be made to the respective control panels during the testing to approximate the performance the end user can expect with a stock driver installation. I will be testing the cards at their stock speeds to see how they stack up and will test each one to find the maximum stable overclock. The cards will be placed in order from highest to lowest performance in each graph to show where they fall by comparison. Resolutions of 1920 x 1080, 2560 x 1440, and 3840 x 2160 will be used.

 

Testing Setup:

Comparison Video Cards:

  • MSI GTX 1050 Gaming

 

Overclocking:

  • XFX RX 460 Slim Single 4GB: 1299MHz Core, 2000MHz Memory

History has shown that the RX series video cards are not really stellar overclockers, but that they do respond with improved performance when you get the most out of them. You can use several methods to overclock an AMD-based card now that most of the utilities have caught up to the design. No longer are we stuck with AMD's Wattman tool to overclock the cards. This card comes from the factory with a 1220MHz core clock speed and a speed of 1750MHz (7000MHz effective) on the 4GB of GDDR5 memory.

Instead of AMD's Wattman tool, I used the latest version of MSI Afterburner to push the clock speeds on this card. I started by moving the power limit to +50% and adjusting the fan speed to 100% before tweaking the clock speeds. I started high and moved down on the core clock speed. I first moved the core clock speed to 1330MHz and promptly black screened when opening up Unigine's Heaven benchmark. I dropped the core clock down to 1300MHz and started boosting the voltage up. Even with the voltage maxed out, anything above 1299MHz was unstable. Dropping the voltage down incrementally, I settled at a +15mv increase as this gave me a 79MHz overclock on the core.

The memory boost was a little more forgiving and reached up to 2000MHz or 8000MHz effective. Both increases delivered measurable FPS increases in game. Ramping the fan speed up for maximum cooling increases noise somewhat, but inside the chassis set three to four feet away, the noise increase is negligible. The impact to cooling is small when compared to the stock clock speeds and fan profile, but the added voltage and current limits do not overwhelm the hybrid copper/aluminum single slot cooling solution.  


 

Maximum Clock Speeds:

Testing for the maximum clock speed consisted of looping Unigine Heaven 4.0 for thirty minutes each to see where the clock speeds failed when pushed. If the clock speed adjustment failed, then the clock speeds and tests were re-run until they passed a full hour of testing.

 
  • Gaming Tests:
  1. Fallout 4
  2. Battlefield 1
  3. Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Wildlands
  4. Tom Clancy's The Division
  5. Hitman (2016)
  6. The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt
  7. Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation
  8. DOOM
  9. Watch Dogs 2
  10. For Honor
  11. 3DMark
  12. VRMark

 

  • Usage:

  1. Temperatures
  2. Power Consumption



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