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Wolf King Warrior Gaming Pad Review

hardnrg    -   February 17, 2008


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Closer Look:

So all you get in the box is the keyboard itself. It has a USB cable attached to it that is about 1.8 metres (6 feet) long, and the keyboard itself is 223 mm (8.75") wide by 208 mm (8.25") deep. The Warrior is available in a range of colors: black, white, red, green, and blue. Obviously, this is the red version.

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If you have played any first person (or third person) shooter games, you will understand the choice of the keys on the Warrior gaming pad. All the keys that you would use with your left hand are arranged in an optimized layout which is a variation on a standard keyboard. QWER, ASDF, and ZXC are in the same positions, but without the traditional slanted, offset positioning of a regular keyboard. The remaining keys are in different positions that are intended to be easier to reach using your left hand, so that the usual stretching to the right side of a standard keyboard, for example, pressing the zero key, is minimised or eliminated. Also the Shift and Ctrl buttons are positioned in a place that is a lot more comfortable and natural feeling to use while gaming. This optimised ergonomic key positioning is a key point that WolfKing makes about this gaming pad and its other gaming keyboards. It is essentially the entire point of WolfKing's keyboard series.

So the Warrior has all the left-hand keys and the most common right-hand keys on the main section of the gaming pad. There are three left-hand keys omitted from the Warrior. It doesn't have a CapsLock key, which is seldom used in games, and the Windows key, which usually annoys you by switching from the game to the desktop to show you the Start Menu! The final left-hand key missing on the Warrior is the V key. The only time I can think when I would use V is for issuing preset voice commands in Unreal Tournament. You could easily keybind voice commands to another key, like (the letter) O. On the side, there are three silver keys, the Escape key, and Volume+ and Volume-. This makes it easy to skip to the game menu whilst playing, and turn the sound up or down without leaving the game. Above these buttons is a red LED that lights up when the keyboard is plugged into a USB port.

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On the bottom of the keyboard, there are four circular rubber feet that act as a non-slip measure to keep the Warrior in place on your desk/table/workstation. There is also a rubber strip near the front edge that stops the Warrior slipping around when using the pad with the rear height adjusting legs.

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Like a regular keyboard, the rear adjusting legs flip out so that the Warrior is angled towards you slightly, so you can choose which is more comfortable according to your preference.

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The keys themselves feel a bit spongey, and the some of the larger keys (large Ctrl, Z, X, C, Alt, (the letter) O, B, and K) presented slightly more resistance when pressed on one side of the key. The Space bar has equal resistance over the entire area of the key. I noticed quite quickly that the key travel (the amount the keys need to be pushed down) is shorter than a regular keyboard. My Cherry CyMotion Expert has a modest 4.5mm of travel, but the Warrior has an even shorter travel of just 3mm. Something that bothered me a little was the size of the number keys from 5 to 9. They seem a bit on the small size, even for my long, thin, Skeletor fingers. I also am not too keen on the Function keys, F1 to F12, being placed right up against the number keys. If the Function keys themselves weren't so thin, it wouldn't be so bad, but because they are so small, it makes it difficult to press the Function keys without feeling like I'm going to also press the number key below it.

On the whole, the keyboard feels solid and doesn't flex when twisted, so it would have no problem being stashed in a bag to take with you to LAN parties or round to a mate's house for a night of gaming. Because WolfKing have designed the Warrior to be portable, I would have liked to see some sort of fabric or nylon bag to carry the keyboard in for travelling. It wouldn't have to be anything special, just something to keep it clean and stop other things interfering with the keys if it was placed in a bag with other items.

So there is no CD or manual in the box? Yes, that's right, you don't need any drivers or software, and the keys work like a regular keyboard's keys, so you don't have to program anything in. How do you install something that requires no installation? Let me show you.

 




  1. Introduction & Closer Look
  2. Closer Look (Inside The Box)
  3. Installation & Configuration
  4. Specifications & Features
  5. Testing (Setup, Crysis, Unreal Tournament 3)
  6. Conclusion
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