Welcome Stranger to OCC!Login | Register

Wi-Fi cAntenna Deluxe 10

Former staff writer    -   December 9, 2003


Testing
I'm not a WiFi expert and I don't claim to be one, but I will try testing the cAntenna to the best of my ability. I will be comparing both the 10" Deluxe cAntenna and the Mini-Tenna cAntenna. I will also be comparing the results, without any external antenna. I tested the signal on three channels and recorded the signal strength and the noise (dBm) on each channel (1,6,11). After gathering the results, I calculated the overall average of the signal strength and the noise. The building that I tested this at, is surrounded by concrete walls and also a hill. I was unable to go very far away from the Access Point since there wasn't much line of sight (which is required with Wifi). Here is the results I came up with:



Device
Signal
Noise
SNR
No Antenna
-53
-119
49
Mini-Tenna 5"
-43
-117
74
cAntenna III 10"
-39
-105
79



Device
Signal
Noise
SNR
No Antenna
-51
-107
54
Mini-Tenna 5"
-43
-119
75
cAntenna III 10"
-44
-118
71



Device
Signal
Noise
SNR
No Antenna
-49
-94
41
Mini-Tenna 5"
-39
-114
70
cAntenna III 10"
-41
-116
66


Device
Signal
Noise
SNR
No Antenna
-51
-106
48
Mini-Tenna 5"
-41
-116
73
cAntenna III 10"
-41
-113
72



Conclusion

I did more tests (real world tests) over the last month that I have had the cAntenna's and I have learned that I like the Mini-Tenna better than the Deluxe. While war driving in my local city I found that the Mini-Tenna is much better at finding Wireless networks abroad, than the Deluxe model. The reason behind this is because the Mini-Tenna has a wider "beam" where it can take in more radio waves than the Deluxe model. I believe the Mini-Tenna would be more suited for war drivers and the Deluxe would be more suited for Point-to-Point connections and security assessments. I also took the cAntenna's with me on a trip up to Virginia and I set the Mini-Tenna on the dash of my car to see how many networks it could find while driving down the interstate from Alabama to Virginia. It found 957 wireless networks (one-way) and only 36% had encryption turned on.

I did a search on some price comparison engines to find out how the cAntenna's compare (price wise) to commercially available 2.4Ghz Antenna's. I quickly found that you could easily pay well over a $100 bucks for an Antenna with the same dBi gain as these two cAntenna's. At $30 for the 5" Mini-Tenna & $35 for the 10" Deluxe, they're much more cost efficient way to expand your wireless network, use for war driving or for security assessments. Sure, you could probably make a cAntenna yourself. I even found some guides on google that shows you how to do just that, but if you're not that great with a soldering iron then the cAntenna's from EtherDesigns is your best bet.

I have never tested any commercially available 2.4Ghz Antenna's before, but for the cost and the performance of the cAntenna's I can't help but highly recommend them.

Pros

  • Inexpensive
  • High dBi Gain
  • Durable & Weatherized

Cons

  • None
LEGACY - OCC Recommended



  1. Introduction, Wi-Fi Crash Course, cAntenna Uses & cAntenna Projects
  2. cAntenna Specifications, What's Included, In-depth Look,
  3. Setup & Software
  4. Testing & Conclusion
Random Pic
© 2001-2014 Overclockers Club ® Privacy Policy

Also part of our network: TalkAndroid, Android Forum, iPhone Informer, Neoseeker, and Used Audio Classifieds

Elapsed: 0.0392768383