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Tuniq Potency 550W Review

paulktreg    -   August 24, 2008
Category: Power Supplies
Price: $85.99
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Introduction:

PC components have changed rapidly over the last few years, becoming more and more powerful at an impressive rate - almost makes you wonder if Skynet is just around the corner! The introduction of dual and quad-core CPUs and power-hungry graphic cards in SLI and CrossFire configurations are great examples. All these things mean just one thing - more watts. Not too long ago, a 400W power supply would support your high-powered gaming rig, but not anymore. If you are running a dual or quad-core CPU, a single high-end - or dual mid-range graphics cards in SLI or CrossFire, the minimum you should be looking at is 500W. Some of you will say this isn't needed, but I say the power supply is one of the most important components in your PC. If you are going to spend hundreds of dollars on PC hardware, the least you can do is install a quality power supply that'll provide more than adequate power.

Tuniq, a division of Sunbeam Technologies based in China, has recently released the "Potency" line of power supplies in 550W, 650W, and 750W versions. This time around, we will be having a look at the 550W version and seeing how it performs. Could the Potency be a power supply capable of running most of the PC's out there? Let's find out!

 

Closer Look:

 

The Tuniq Potency packaging follows a very basic black and white theme, with a splash of colour on the lid's photograph. I haven't included any photographs of the sides, because to be honest, there wasn't a lot to see - model number on one side, and power supply features, mentioned later, on the other. The bottom panel included the specification table for the full Potency range, so I can only conclude that the same packaging is used for all units.

 

 

 

On opening up the box, you are greeted with what can only be described as basic packaging. The power supply is enveloped  in bubble  wrap, the power supply leads and mains chord held together with cable ties, the manual at the bottom, and the extras tucked down the side of the power supply. The packaging can really only be described as adequate, but this unit did make it from Hong Kong to the UK undamaged, snuggly tucked inside another cardboard box - so perhaps it's enough!

 

 

Along with the power supply, you get an instruction booklet, mains chord, cable ties, mounting screws, and a Molex "Y" cable, should you want an extra 4-pin Molex or to extend an existing one.

 

 

 




  1. Introduction & Closer Look
  2. Closer Look (The Power Supply)
  3. Specifications & Features
  4. Testing: Load Testing 110VAC, 230VAC
  5. Testing: Efficiency and Power Factor
  6. Testing: Temperature, Noise Levels, and Fan Speeds
  7. Conclusion
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