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soundscience Halo Bias Lighting Review

BluePanda    -   July 26, 2011
Category: Monitors
Price: $12.95
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Introduction:

soundscience is a subsidiary of Antec Inc. founded in 2010 to provide audio- and video-enabled products for PC and home entertainment. Currently, soundscience only offers two items for purchase: the "ruckus 3D", a 2.1 speaker system, and the "halo 6 LED bias lighting kit", the item up for review.

The soundscience halo 6 LED bias lighting kit is designed to provide your monitor with professional backlighting to help reduce eye fatigue and increase perceived image clarity during extended use. Since most offices, bedrooms, and other places are often lit from above, the wall behind your monitor tends to be a dark shadow. Lighting up the wall behind your monitor not only keeps your screen from blinding you at night but it also increases its apparent contrast ratio. Your black levels will seem darker and your colors will look more vivid.

The concept is valid, but does it work? Let’s take a look and find out.

Closer Look:

The bias lighting kit comes curled up in a rather generic glossy package. The box sports a grey, not quite uni-color appearance, with a picture of a backlit monitor on the front. On the back you will find the installation instructions and a product description printed in white text. A hanger is built into the box, allowing it to be hung at any retail store. It reminds me of something I would find at the front of a store in the checkout line. The back of the box displays the easy installation instructions: remove from box, stick on, and then plug ‘n play. Opening the box reveals nothing but the curled up light strip inside.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When taken out of the package, the strip uncurls easily and is rather flexible. It has a soft, rubbery feel and becomes even more flexible when the protective film is removed. Due to the placement of resistors and LED circuitry, the strip indicates only two locations where it may be cut to fit smaller monitors. The spacing is roughly 4 inches between cut sites and limits the number of LEDs you can place on smaller monitors; each cut removes two of the six LEDs.

 


 




  1. Introduction & Closer Look
  2. Closer Look Continued & Installation
  3. Specifications & Features
  4. Testing
  5. Conclusion
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