SilenX Effizio 80mm and 140mm Fan Review

BluePanda - 2011-08-29 19:00:53 in Cooling
Category: Cooling
Reviewed by: BluePanda   
Reviewed on: September 19, 2011
Price: $8.99-$11.99

Introduction:

Case fans can make or break a build when it comes to running a home theater PC or even a rig you just want to be quiet. Water cooling or not, fans are a necessity in keeping your components from overheating. To avoid the annoying buzz of some fans, SilenX had developed a couple of fans for those of you who want to be on the down low, especially if your mom told you to go to bed already. The biggest connotation with silent fans is that they tend to, pardon me, suck. Quiet fans usually tend to move little air to keep their quiet tag. However, the market is changing and engineers are finally figuring out the secret to moving the same amount of air while remaining quiet and affordable. 

So where do these offerings from SilenX stand in the battlefield of fans, are they full of flow and stealthy? Let's find out. Today we will take a look at the SilenX EFFIZIO 80mm Temperature Controlled Thermistor Edition as well as the SilenX EFFIZIO 140mm silent fan, both featuring ultra-durable fluid dynamic bearings. 

Closer Look:

Both fans came in a typical clam shell plastic packaging with a green and yellow backing for the 80mm and 140mm fan respectively. The larger 140mm package sports their three main features of the fan in 3 different languages, while the 80mm reads the same three in English with the added introduction of the automatic temperature fan control. Both feature optimized blade geometry, fluid dynamic bearings, and vibration dampening mounts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The edges of the packaging were not sealed/melted shut, so opening them didn’t require any scissors or sharp objects, a major plus there. The screws and silicone mounting pieces came sealed in a small zip bag that prevented them from dumping all over the floor when the package was opened. 4 standard fan screws and 5 silicone mounting pieces were included (I am assuming an extra in case you break one). A well folded, full-color instruction guide was packaged neatly against the fan and around the screws.

 

 

A close up of each fan shows the vibrant yellow color of the 140mm and the classic white blades on the 80mm fan. A sneak peak preview on SilenX’s media site shows a possibility of both a red and clear version of the fan in the 80mm size, but no hints as to any other colors for the 140mm fan. So for those of you who like to run quiet and color coordinate, beggars can’t be choosers.

 

 

Inside the case the fans are a little difficult to mount if you already have all your components set up. So replacing a current fan is tricky, but far from impossible. The silicone mounts that replace the use of your typical fan screws are quite cleaver in nature, but they did provide 5 for a reason though! Pull too hard and you won’t have an extra silicon mount anymore…oops! This feature made the fan easy to install considering you didn’t have to thread the fan yourself and it holds the fan in place just the same. Perhaps it will also add to the silence of the case.

 

Specifications:

140mm:

Part Number:
EFX-14-12
Dimensions:
140 x 140 x 25 mm
Speed:
900 ± 15% RPM
Noise:
12 dba
Airflow:
48 CFM
Voltage:
7-12 V
Current:
0.08 A
Power:
0.96 W
Bearing Type:
Fluid Dynamic

 

80mm:

Part Number:
EFX-08-15T
Dimensions:
80 x 80 x 25 mm
Speed:
1700 ± 15% RPM
Noise:
<15dba
Airflow:
<32 CFM
Voltage:
12 V
Current:
0.09 A
Power:
1.08 W
Bearing Type:
Fluid Dynamic

 

Features:

140mm:

 

80mm:

 

 

All information courtesy of SilenX @http://www.silenx.com/index.asp

Testing:

The SilenX EFFIZIO 80mm and 140mm fans were put to the test. Using OCCT, I threw all the heat my case full of hardware could give to these fans with their infamous Power Supply Test. After a solid thirty minute run with a near max out on my GPU temps, I’m confident that I couldn’t produce any more heat, at least without fire. HW Monitor brought the results together by providing me with temperatures for my CPU, motherboard, HDDs, and GPUs.

With an attempt to keep our electric bill down our ambient room temperature started a bit high at 29 degrees Celsius, further showing how much air theses fans can or cannot move. The tests were run when the case had completely returned to idle temperatures after several hours to avoid any excessively preheated components affecting the results.

Since the main objective for the SilenX EFFIZIOs was to provide great cooling with limited sound output the 140mm fans were run on high and compared subjectively. The 80mm EFFIZIO is controlled by a thermistor and was listened to at different temperatures as well.

Testing Setup for 140mm:

 

Testing Setup for 80mm:

 

Comparison Fans:

 

The results of the 140mm and 80mm fan tests were rather surprising. I knew the stock/cheap fans I have been running aren’t the best, but I didn’t think I would see any change going to a silent style fan. I’ve always branded them as slow, low airflow, and useless. But I have to hand it to SilenX, these fans aren’t half bad. The temperatures for the stock fans at idle and load are provided along with the idle and load temperatures for the SilenX fans.

Testing:

140mm Results:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

   

   

   

 

The 140mm fan didn’t show much difference in the temperatures compared to the stock Cooler Master fan. However, with such a large case and such well developed air flow, it isn’t too surprising that it didn’t improve temperatures. However, the SilenX itself is indeed quiet running at full speed. Even with your head next to the fan it is one of the quieter fans I have heard.

Testing:

80mm Results:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

   

   

   

 

 

The 80mm on the other hand really shocked me. The case, which is small and cramped being a home theater PC really improved with a simple swap of the fan. The fan was no louder than the 80mm fan already in there and the temperatures dropped across every aspect of testing. Everything was an improvement, not just a mere 1 degree change here and there, but a change in 5 degrees over the GPU temperatures alone. Yes, the idle temperatures did increase, but I expected that with a self-controlled throttling fan (not much of a change either). For simply replacing a single fan I am actually impressed. I think I might get another one for myself after this. A quiet fan with good air flow, can’t really ask for more.

Conclusion:

Overall I was quite surprised with both of these SilenX fans. Expecting them to be focused solely on the audible sound levels, I did not foresee them to produce much airflow. However the design of these fans is well worth a look at. The silicone mounting is by no means a novel concept or even an addition, but just the change in installing a fan made it interesting and fun. I can really see how this would help reduce noise with either loose screws or simply stripped fan holes. After moving fans from case to case and build to build the threads tend to take a beating and have less of a firm grip. The silicone mounts are a nice flair to the whole set up and help reduce any vibration from the fans as well.

Bottom line, the 80mm really changed the temperatures in the home theater PC case. This will save on the thermal wear and tear over the years and perhaps get me a little more out of my machine. Maybe I will even push that OC up a bit again. The 140mm doesn’t make a huge change in a large airflow situation. Large fans by nature tend to be less noisy while still moving a lot of air. I will say I do like the vibrant color but beyond that I don’t see myself buying one over any other 140mm case fan. However, from what I’ve seen with the 80mm fan in small spaces, I’d love to see what one of these 140mm fans could do with a CPU cooler.

 

140mm Pros and Cons:

Pros:

Cons:

 

 

80mm Pros and Cons

Pros:

Cons: