Sapphire HD 5450 512MB Review

jlqrb - 2009-01-05 21:54:42 in Video Cards
Category: Video Cards
Reviewed by: jlqrb   
Reviewed on: February 3, 2010
Price: $53.99

Introduction:

Since the release of the ATI 5-series graphics cards, ATI has maintained a strong presence in the mid-range and high-end markets, but without an entry-level offering there has been a rather large gap in their current line-up. To fill this gap and expand the series, ATI is releasing the HD 5450, which will replace current cards on the market such as the ATI HD 4350 and HD 4550 as their 'de facto' mainstream entry. The HD 5450 comes with specifications that seem similar to the older HD 4550 graphics cards, but will come with features that were introduced with the 5-series, such as DX 11 and be manufactured on a 40nm die. With the reduction in die size from the older cores the HD 5450 can get by with only 20 watts of required power at full load, which should decrease the overall operating temperature of the card. Add to this the low profile design, passive cooling and exceptional HD playback thanks to ATI Avivo™ Technology, all make the HD 5450 look like a really nice option for a HTPC. Also, with the use of ATI Stream technology the graphics card can now split part of the load from tasks such as photo and video editing as well as HD playback. Though part of ATI's new graphics card line, the HD 5450 should not be thought of as a gaming graphics card, but rather a capable replacement for on-board video or older entry-level graphics that just can't quite get the job done with today's demanding applications.

The HD 5450 that we are going to be looking at comes to us from Sapphire and is one of ten models that are going to be release with the HD 5450 title. This card is one of the models in the series that includes 512MB DDR3 memory and comes with a Display port with Eyefinity support. The others versions will be available as either 512MB or 1GB models, using DDR2 or DDR3 with a  64-bit memory interface. There will, however, be one model that comes standard with faster GDDR5 memory and this will be the other model that will support ATI's Eyefinity technology. Even though ATI Eyefinity Technology is only supported by two of the models being introduced, it is nice to see this technology and others, such as DX 11, start to hit a more mainstream audience.

 

 

Closer Look:

The packaging the HD 5450 comes in a box that is black and copper in color and has an image of Sapphire's video vixen Ruby on the front! Below Ruby, Sapphire has listed the capabilities of the HD 5450 such as ATI Eyefinity, on-board Display port and DVI, CrossFireX™ and the size of the die. The front of the box also has the memory size and type listed near the top with the graphics card name below it. The reverse side the box has listed features and specifications that the card offers, as well as a run down of how they are beneficial.

 

 

 

 

The packaging we looked at previously is just an outer shell that houses the protective cardboard casing inside of it. This protective inner cardboard box is where the graphics card and accessories that come with it are found. The inner packaging has liner inside of it that holds the HD 5450 and the accessory securely in place.

 

 

I was surprised to see the included accessories that came with the Sapphire HD 5450 only consisted of the manual, driver CD, SimHD disc and two low profile bracket converters. Sapphire usually includes as much as they can when it comes to accessories, but even without all the extra connectors, there should be enough here to get you going.

 

With the card out of the packaging, we can start our closer look at HD 5450 and see what it brings to the table.

Closer Look:

The Sapphire HD 5450 comes as a low-profile card that uses durable all solid capacitors and has a passively cooled heatsink over the GPU core. This passive cooling should be more than enough to ensure the graphics card stays within safe operating temperatures as the card only requires 20 watts of power at full load. This low power requirement also means there is no need for any extra power cables to the graphics card, with all supplied power easily be supplied straight from the motherboards PCIe x 16 slot. This new card comes with supports for PCIe 2.1, but will work with older PCIe configurations such as PCIe 2.0 and 1.0 as well, so there is no need to worry about compatibility here. At the back end of the card is a two pin fan header that can be used if an active aftermarket heatsink with a fan is added for better cooling.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The HD 5450 comes with a host of connectivity options that should satisfy most users. First, let's look at the Display port which can run resolutions up to 2560 x 1600, but best of all is its supports ATI Eyefinity Technology, which can run up to three displays. Next, there is an included dual link DVI-I port that can run resolutions all the way up 2560 x 1600.  Last, but not least, is the standard VGA port, which will support resolutions up to 2048 x 1536.  For users with cases that cannot fit full sized expansion brackets, the HD 5450 comes with two low profile brackets. One bracket allows access to the the graphics cards HDMI and DVI-I ports and is secured onto the card itself, the other bracket is solely for the VGA port and can be placed in a empty expansion slot directly below or above the expansion slot the card is occupying. This is a nice feature, as it is often the case in these situations that you would lose the VGA port entirely, making this is a nice workaround.

 

 

For cooling, the HD 5450 uses a passively cooled heatsink that covers most of the bottom of the GPU and has a small portion that wraps around the top . Unlike active cooling, passive cooling will not produce any noise due to there being no fan or moving parts or air. The heatsink is black in color and has a finned design and should be more than capable of cooling the low wattage GPU core below it.

 

The HD 5450 graphics cards uses the Cedar graphics processing core with a clock frequency of 650MHz. The Cedar core is manufactured on a 40nm die with 80 steam processors and has a 64-bit memory interface. The included memory chips on the review model are 512MB DDR3 memory modules clocked at 1600MHz. The modules are found on both the front and back of the PCB and are manufactured by Samsung, which seems to be the case with a few of the new ATI cards. The HD 5450 will be available as both 512MB (like the one I am reviewing) or 1GB models, with most using either DDR2 or DDR3 and one using GDDR5 memory.

 

 

Now that we have had a good look at the card itself, we can get it in the system and start the installation process.


 

Closer Look:

To install the HD 5450 graphics drivers, you insert the drivers disc into your DVD drive and after a few seconds a auto installer will pop-up with a few options. The first available screen gives three options on the right to choose from. The options listed are ATI Easy Install, Online Manual, and Adobe Reader. Easy install is for installing the GPU and software drivers that are needed to get your graphics cards operating properly. The Online Manual is a link which lets you download a PDF version of the manual and the Adobe Reader sends you over to Adobe's website so you can download the latest version of Adobe Reader. If you don't need the manual or Adobe, you can start the installation.  Once you have made this selection to install the drivers, you will enter another screen that looks similar to the first. From here, you will be able to choose the operating system you plan to use the card with and, after that selection is made, the Catalyst install manager will appear for installation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once the installation process has started, you will be prompted with a few options to choose from. The first option that comes up is the option to install or uninstall your drivers. If you are installing the graphics card for the first time, choose install and it will advance the installation. In the next screen, you will have the option to choose whether to install the drivers manually or do a quick express install. If you choose express, all of the included Catalyst drivers will be installed, however if manual install is chosen, you will have the ability to pick and choose from a list of needed drivers. Whatever option you choose, it all quickly installs the same and after a few minutes you will be asked to finish the installation and, after a quick reboot, the drivers are installed and ready to go.

 

 

 

 

Now that we have the drivers installed, we can get an in depth look at the Catalyst Control Center.

Closer Look:

When you first open the Catalyst Control Center, you find yourself in the welcome screen. From here, you will be able to check for updates, Contact customer care, Send AMD your feedback, Visit AMD.com and join ATI's folding@home team. To leave the home screen and access other areas found in the Control Center, use one of two drop down menus at the top of the welcome screen.The first drop down menu is Graphics and the other is Hydravision. Each menu, when selected, gives you a list of options to choose from. In the Graphics drop down menu, the first option to choose from under the Welcome screen is the Information Center. This is where you will find useful information such as installed software versions, as well as the frequencies and specifications of your hardware. The hardware and software are broken up by two tabs at the top of the screen that, when selected, list the requested information in the screen below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
  

 

 

 

The next option in the Graphics drop down menu is the Desktops & Displays page. This is where you can make basic changes to the settings of the monitor or monitors you have connected. The options here let you detect your displays, manage your monitors, and rotate the image on your monitor.

 

The next menu is Desktop Properties, which give you a host of options to choose from. Here, you can adjust your display resolution, color quality, refresh rate, and choose the rotation of the image being displayed. There are also options here to adjust the colors of the monitor by either changing the Gamma, Brightness, or Contrast.

 

 

The next two options in the menu are Display Options and the 3D menu. The Display Option simply selects how Catalyst Control Center detects your display devices, whether that be manually or done automatically when the Control center is opened. The 3D menu has several tabs at the top that allow change the 3D features such as Anti-Aliasing or Anisotropic Filtering - these options can be set to either Performance, Balanced or Quality depending on your 3D needs and hardware used.

 

 

Next up, we have the  Avivo Video page. Here you have five tabs to choose from, with all letting you adjust the quality for your video. There is a preview is with an image of a woman next to flowers and fruit, that when changes are made to the video color will be seen by this image changing to reflect the choice you made. If you find that you don't like your choice, there is a handy default tab at the bottom right that will reset all of the setting here back to stock. From here, you can also change the basic quality of your video as well as change the color, contrast, and more to all of the settings.

 

The latest additional menu is the HydraVision menu. This menu has three options that let you adjust options to your screen and do things such as set a grid to lock applications to a certain part of  your desktop or setup multiple desktops. This is quite a cool feature that could come handy if you use multiple applications at once.

 

 

Now that the Catalyst Control Center is covered, we can continue to the specifications and then benchmarks!

Specifications:

SKU
11166-02
11166-01
11166-00
11166-04
11166-14
ASIC
Radeon HD 5450
Radeon HD 5450
Radeon HD 5450
Radeon HD 5450
Radeon HD 5450
Bus Interface
PCI-E x16 (PCI-E 2.1)
PCI-E x16 (PCI-E 2.1)
PCI-E x16 (PCI-E 2.1)
PCI-E x16 (PCI-E2.1)
PCI-E x16 (PCI-E2.1)
Memory
1024MB / 64-bit DDR3
512MB / 64-bit DDR3
512MB / 64-bit DDR3
512MB/ 64-bit DDR2
1024MB/ 64-bit DDR2
Clock Speed
650MHz Eclk / Effective 1600 MHz Mclk
650MHz Eclk / Effective 1600 MHz Mclk
650MHz Eclk / Effective 1600 MHz Mclk
650MHz Eclk / Effective 800 MHz Mclk
600MHz Eclk / Effective 812 MHz Mclk
Cooling System
Single slot passive heatsink
Single slot passive heatsink
Single slot passive heatsink
Single slot passive heatsink
Single slot passive heatsink
Bracket
Full Height
Full Height
Full Height
Full Height
Full Height
Display Support
DVI-I
HDMI                                            
VGA
DVI-I
HDMI                                            
VGA
DVI-I
Display Port
VGA
DVI-I
HDMI
VGA
DVI-I
HDMI
VGA
HDCP
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Eyefinity Support
No
No
Yes
No
No
Crossfire Support
Software Crossfire
Software Crossfire
Software Crossfire
Software Crossfire
Software Crossfire
Accessories
HDMI+DVI LP bracket x1
VGA LP bracket x1
HDMI+DVI LP bracketx1
VGA LP bracket x1
DP+DVI LP  bracketx1
VGA LP bracket x1
HDMI+DVI LP  bracket x1
VGA LP bracket x1
HDMI+DVI LP  bracket x1
VGA LP bracket x1
Software Bundle
11166-02-40R is bundled with Arcsoft SIMHD IM*
11166-01-40R is bundled with Arcsoft SIMHD IM*
11166-00-40R is bundled with Arcsoft SIMHD IM*
11166-04-40R is bundled with Arcsoft SIMHD IM*
11166-14-40R is bundled with Arcsoft SIMHD IM*

 

SKU
11166-07
11166-08
11166-09
11166-06
11166-16
ASIC
Radeon HD 5450
Radeon HD 5450
Radeon HD 5450
Radeon HD 5450
Radeon HD 5450
Bus Interface
PCI-E x16 (PCI-E 2.1)
PCI-E x16 (PCI-E 2.1)
PCI-E x16 (PCI-E 2.1)
PCI-E x16 (PCI-E2.1)
PCI-E x16 (PCI-E2.1)
Memory
1024MB / 64-bit DDR3
512MB / 64-bit DDR3
512MB / 64-bit GDDR5
512MB/ 64-bit DDR2
1024MB/ 64-bit DDR2
HyperMemory support
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Clock Speed
650Hz Eclk / Effective 1600 MHz Mclk
650Hz Eclk / Effective 1600 MHz Mclk
650Hz Eclk / Effective 1600 MHz Mclk
650MHz Eclk / Effective 800 MHz Mclk
600MHz Eclk / Effective 812 MHz Mclk
Cooling System
Single slot passive heatsink
Single slot passive heatsink
Single slot passive heatsink
Single slot passive heatsink
Single slot passive heatsink
Bracket
Full Height
Full Height
Full Height
Full Height
Full Height
Display Support
DL-DVI-I
HDMI                                            
VGA
DL-DVI-I
HDMI                                            
VGA
DL-DVI-I
Display Port
VGA
DVI-I
HDMI
VGA
DVI-I
HDMI
VGA
HDCP
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Eyefinity Support
No
No
Yes
No
No
Crossfire Support
Software Crossfire
Software Crossfire
Software Crossfire
Software Crossfire
Software Crossfire
Accessories
HDMI+DVI LP bracketx1
VGA LP bracket x1
HDMI+DVI LP bracketx1
VGA LP bracket x1
DP+DVI LP bracketx1
VGA LP bracketx1
HDMI+DVI LP bracketx1
VGA LP bracket x1
HDMI+DVI LP bracketx1
VGA LP bracket x1
Software Bundle
11166-07-40R is bundled with Arcsoft SIMHD IM*
11166-08-40R is bundled with Arcsoft SIMHD IM*
11166-09-40R is bundled with Arcsoft SIMHD IM*
11166-06-40R is bundled with Arcsoft SIMHD IM*
11166-16-40R is bundled with Arcsoft SIMHD IM*

 

Features:

 

System Requirements


Maximum Display Resolution:

 

All information courtesy of Sapphire Technology

Testing:

Even though the Sapphire HD 5450 is an  entry-level graphics card and I don't expect it to achieve great FPS, I am still looking forward to seeing how it handles our testbed of games and benchmarks at the lower resolutions. For testing, I will be running the card though our series of gaming benchmarks, as well as programs such as 3DMark06 and 3DMark Vantage to gauge the overall gaming performance of the graphics card.  I will also be comparing the graphics card to some of its mainstream contemporaries. As a budget level card, the HD 5450 will, for the most part, not be purchased to play games such as the ones I am about to run it though. Some games the card would perform well with would be WOW or the Sims, but those games aren't very graphics intensive and what fun would it be if we didn't push the card to the max? One note, though all of the comparison cards were originally tested on an Intel platform and have been retested on the AMD test platform so the numbers will vary from the comparison reviews. These cards were tested with the latest drivers from both Nvidia and ATI.

 

 

Comparison Boards:

 

Overclocking:

When it came to overclocking, I used the AMD GPU Clock Tool and to my surprise I was able to overclock the HD 5450 quite high. I started out raising the core and memory in small increments, as I didn't expect much overclocking headroom from an entry-level card. After reaching 750MHz on the core and 1700MHz on the memory, I started raising the frequencies in larger amounts and in the end the HD 5450 was able to reach a final speed of 823MHz for the core and 1802MHz for the memory. This is pretty impressive for a passively cooled budget graphics card. As you can tell from the image, the HD 5450 is not yet fully supported by GPU-Z , so most information is not listed and some such as the bus width is just wrong.

 

 

 

 

Benchmarks:

  1. Far Cry 2
  2. Crysis Warhead
  3. Darkest of Days
  4. Call of Duty World at War
  5. Warhammer 40,000 DOW II
  6. Batman: Arkham Asylum
  7. Resident Evil 5
  8. Left 4 Dead
  9. 3DMark 06 Professional
  10. 3DMark Vantage

Testing:

Far Cry 2:

Featuring a new game engine named Dunia, this game looks to be another one to stress your video card. Built especially for Far Cry 2, this engine allows for real time effects and damage. This next generation First Person Shooter comes to us from Ubisoft surprisingly - not from Crytek. The game is set in a war-torn region of Africa where there is a non-existent central government and the chaos that surrounds this type of social environment. If you have seen the movie Blood Diamond, you know the setting. Ubisoft puts the main story line of the game into focus with these statements: "Caught between two rival factions in war-torn Africa, you are sent to take out "The Jackal," a mysterious character who has rekindled the conflict between the warlords, jeopardizing thousands of lives. In order to fulfill your mission you will have to play the factions against each other, identify and exploit their weaknesses, and neutralize their superior numbers and firepower with surprise, subversion, cunning and, of course, brute force." In this version of the game, you don't have the beautiful water, but instead the beauty and harshness of the African continent to contend with. Most games give you a set area that can be played through, while Ubisoft has given the gamer the equivalent of 50km2 of the vast African continent to explore while in pursuit of your goals. The settings used are just a few steps below the maximum in-game settings and offer a good blend of performance vs. visual quality.

 

Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The HD 5450 was not able to reach playable FPS at any resolution in Far Cry 2. Once overclocked, the game was almost playable at lower resolutions.

Testing:

Crysis Warhead is a standalone expansion pack situated in time with the story line of the original Crysis. As Sergeant "Psycho" Sykes, you have a secret mission to accomplish on the far side of the island. Along the way there are EMP blasts and aliens to contend with, as you hunt down the KPA chief. This game uses an enhanced version of the CryEngine 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Again, as expected, the HD 5450 could not handle Crysis Warhead and was only able to reach 11 FPS at the lowest resolution. Overclocking didn't change much here.

Testing:

What would testing be if you did not show both sides of the fence? In this test, PhysX was set to low, while leaving the remaining settings intact. You have seen time and again where the ATI cards suffer when PhysX is enabled. Mirror's Edge and Cryostasis are two prime examples. Darkest of Days is no different. What happens in this test shows that, although the game can be played by cards from the red team, the video effects and quality are diminished.

Game Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Higher is Better

 

Darkest of Days really pushes the HD 5450 past its limits, as the card continues to be the last of the bunch at both stock and overclocked settings.

Testing:

Activision's Call of Duty: World at War goes right back to the bread and butter of the franchise - WWII FPS action. In this rendition, you start off in the South Pacific and move through a series of missions that flip back and forth between the Russian front and the island hopping advance toward the Imperial Japanese homeland. Included is a mission on Peliliu Island, arguably one of the more difficult and costly battles in the Pacific theater. The gameplay in the single player mode is rather short, but the game makes up for this shortcoming in online gameplay. If you thought CoD4 looked nice, this game is amazing with the graphics maxed out playing at a high resolution. I will use Fraps to measure a section of gameplay in the Semper Fi map on Makin Island to compare the performance of these video cards.

Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The HD 5450, again, could not handle the game at any resolution.

Testing:

Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War II is a Real Time Strategy game that is significantly different than its predecessor, with improved AI and an improved physics engine. You can play either as a single player in campaign mode, or in a multiplayer game where Microsoft's Live ranking system can be used.

Settings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The trend continues with Warhammer, as the HD 5450 comes in with 13 FPS at the lowest resolution and overclocking did little to improve this.

Testing:

Batman: Arkham Asylum is a new game that brings together two bitter foes, the Joker and Batman. The Joker has taken over Arkham Asylum, Gotham's home for the criminally insane. Your task is to reign the Joker back in and restore order. This game makes use of PhysX technology to create a rich environment for you to ply your trade.

Game Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the settings reduced to medium, Batman was playable at the lowest resolution and once the card was overclocked it almost reached 40 FPS at the lowest resolution.

Testing:

Resident Evil 5 is the sequel to one of the best selling video games of all time. You play the game as Chris Redfield, a survivor of the events at Raccoon City, who now works for the BSAA. Sent to Africa to find the genesis of the latest Bio Organic agents, you meet up with another BSAA operative and work together to solve the problem. The game offers incredible 3D effects and a co-op gaming style.

Game Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The performance in Resident Evil 5 was decent, with the HD 5450 reaching 25 FPS in low resolutions at stock and 29 FPS once overclocked.

Testing:

Left 4 Dead from Valve, leaves you as part of a group of survivors in a world where an infection has rapidly turned the populace into a zombie horde. You goal is to make it to a rescue point, all the while fighting what seems like overwhelming odds. Along the way there are safe houses where you can replenish your weapons and health. The movie 'I Am Legend' comes to mind to set the stage for this game. But unlike the movie, there are four characters and not just a lone gun and his faithful companion. The horde is not at all like the typical slow walking, foot shuffling zombie. These zombies are quick and work with the pack mentality. Your job: survival!

Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The HD 5450 put up a good showing in Left 4 Dead and was playable well in the resolutions under 1920x1200.

Testing:

3DMark06 is one of the benchmarks that always comes up when a bragging contest has begun. 3DMark06 presents a severe test for many of today's hardware components. Let's see how this setup fares. The settings we will use are listed below.

 

Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The HD 5450 didn't fair too well in 3DMark06, putting up scoresmuch less than the comparison suite of video cards.

Testing:

Featuring all-new game tests, this benchmark is for use with Vista based systems. "There are two all-new CPU tests that have been designed around a new 'Physics and Artificial Intelligence-related computation.' CPU test two offers support for physics related hardware." There are four preset levels that correspond to specific resolutions. 'Entry' is 1024x768 progressing to 'Extreme' at 1920x1200. Of course, each preset can be modified to arrange any number of user designed testing. For our testing, I will use the four presets at all default settings.

Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The HD 5450 was again in last place, but we knew going into the benchmarks tthe HD 5450 is a discrete card for use in mainstream or acasual gaming environment.

Testing:

World of Warcraft:

Something we normally do not do is look at the mainstream or casual gaming segment when testing video cards. To test the mainstream gaming value of the HD 5450 I installed WOW and took a stroll around one of the most popular online virtual worlds ever. This game has remained a extremely popular MMORPG since its release and is a good example the type of games that the HD 5450 should be able to easily handle. During the testing there was a large battle going on in the village of Goldshire. With the battle raging, I was able to test the performance in WOW with around 15 to 25 characters on the screen for the time I was recording the FPS.

 

Settings:

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see, WOW is easily playable on the HD5450, even with resolutions all the way up to 1920x1200. There is some value for casual gaming segment that should prove fruitful with this kind of game.

Conclusion:

With ATI's current and Nvidia's upcoming high-end graphics cards taking all of the oxygen out of the room, it is easy to forget that must mainstream users don't want (or need) the amount of power and price that come attached with enthusiast grade products. This group of users is instead looking for an option that is budget friendly and can allow them access to some of the advanced technologies of the day. In this regard, the HD 5450 does an outstanding job. The card is the first to incorporate DX 11 and also the first to use a display port with support for ATI's Eyefinity technology in an affordable, sub-$100 offering. These are no small feats and, even though there are models that will be released without Eyefinity support and there is not a great deal of DX 11 games available, the trickle down of these key 5-series technologies will greatly benefit many in the mainstream.

With the home PC's becoming such an integral part of digital video, photography, and media, many users find themselves doing some kind of editing, watching, or transcoding on an almost daily basis. This is precisely the reason that features such as ATI's stream technology, which when supported by both the graphics card and software can accelerate applications by using the CPU and GPU in concert such an important part of today's computing experience. There was a time not too long ago, where all processing outside of gaming was handled solely by the CPU, which could be a major strain on your system. This was just how it was, and if you didn't have extremely expensive hardware, you might not get the best results while doing larger scale digital editing, watching HD content, or even running a simple interface such Windows Aero. This is no longer the case and graphics cards have now advanced beyond just being a way to view an image on your monitor or play the latest games, into a more integrated part of computing as a whole. With companies such as Adobe including GPU acceleration into their latest photo editing and flash player programs, users can get more done in less time than ever before. This is extremely helpful in many circumstances and even entry-level cards with low prices can handle acceleration quite well. It is features like these that, when combined with others such as ATI PowerPlay ™ Technology, Accelerated Video Transcoding, ATI Avivo™ Technology and Eyefinity, that make the HD 5450 ideal for both HTPC and workstations. When it comes to the HTPC crowd, the HD 5450 has a few extra goodies though and also includes a low profile design and uses only 20 watts of power at full load, allowing the passive cooling heatsink to easily keep the temperatures under control.

With the HD 5450 from Sapphire you should have more than enough power for you daily tasks and will even be able to play mainstream games such as World of Warcraft and The Sims. These games don't require the high-end gear of some of the more demanding games out, but if they do have any slow down, the HD 5450 can overclock quite well, which can improve the gaming performance of the card as well make applications that use ATI stream run faster. Even with performance that is not leaps and bounds over its predecessor, the HD 5450 does manage to bring a host of new technologies to a much wider audience, but whether or not these technologies are worth upgrading from your current hardware is entirely up to your specific needs. You have to focus on the market for this card, High end gaming is not it, obviously, but is the mainstream market looking for an upgrade path over a current integrated solution for use with applications that support GPU acceleration for an overall performance increase in your day to day tasks.

 

 

Pros:

 

Cons: