ROCCAT Roundup: Mice, Mousepad, and Bungee

BluePanda - 2013-02-15 23:09:29 in Input Devices
Category: Input Devices
Reviewed by: BluePanda   
Reviewed on: May 6, 2013
Price: $69.99, $89.99, $39.99, $18.99

ROCCAT Roundup Introduction:

I'm back again with more peripheral products; this time we'll take a look at what ROCCAT has to offer with two mice, a bungee, and a mousepad. Here at OCC, we've previously looked at the Kova[+] Gaming Mouse and the Kulo 7.1 USB Headset. Both were incredible, quality items that seemed to be plagued by a high cost. After watching ROCCAT grow, the company continues to have a high value for its products, but produces solid, quality products that even angry gamers, like myself, have a hard time destroying. With that said, I have high hopes for the ROCCAT products we'll be looking at today.

On the bench today are two mice: the ROCCAT Kone XTD, and ROCCAT Kone Pure. Placed next to each other, they honestly look like a pair – a "his and hers" mouse set. So I guess if you have any special dates coming up, this could potentially be a gift idea that benefits you as well. The Kone XTD is a little bigger with more lighting, while the Kone Pure has the same shape, but is a bit smaller with less lighting. The two mice should compete quite well, leaving you to choose between big or small.

Along with the two mice is the mousepad, which comes from the ROCCAT Sense series. There are three different "BOLD" designs to choose from, yet all are another form of blue: Glacier Blue, Adrenaline Blue, and Chrome Blue. Today we'll look at the Sense Blue mousepad from ROCCAT. How will it compare to your current pad of choice? To finish off the deal, the bungee combines with the mousepad as assistants to the two mice today. Both play supporting roles to successful mousing! The ROCCAT Apuri stands in to hold your mouse cable out of the way and in place. It also features a USB hub with additional power available and an awesome blue environment light. So let's get to work and actually take a look at this ROCCAT bundle of goods.

 

ROCCAT Roundup Closer Look:

We've got quite a lot to look at today from ROCCAT. Even while still in the boxes, the products look pretty good all piled up. The Kone Pure sits in the back left, the Kone XTD hides its identity on the bottom, the Apuri sits on top of it, and the rolled up Sense mousepad is curled up there in front.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We'll start looking at the Kone Pure first. Its box is very colorful and flashy in appearance. If nothing else, I must admit that ROCCAT has always put a lot into its boxes. Whether this comes to you as an additional cost or not, the box is at least pretty even if what's inside isn’t. Let's hope today we like what we get in all these boxes. The ROCCAT Kone Pure features 8200 DPI, the Easy Shift[+] (explained in the software page), multi-color options, and ultimate tracking. There's a lot going on all over the box: listed features in different languages, diagrams of features, and even a pop-open window to take a look at the mouse itself. I must give props to the ROCCAT artists for this impressive box work.

 

 

We have another mouse to look at today as well. It's a little bigger in size and looks a little like the ROCCAT Kone[+] I unofficially tested awhile back. Perhaps things have changed and we'll get some good use out of this one. The box is much like the Kone Pure above, with lots of descriptions and a neat window to peek in. I really applaud the idea of being able to place my hand inside to try it on for fit (at least if I'm at the store).

 

 

The ROCCAT Apuri is next on the agenda – a new active USB hub mouse bungee. Described on the box as a "Desk Assistant," it's a mouse bungee with USB ports. It sounds like a good idea conceptually, but will it really be an assistant? The box is just as fancy as the other ROCCAT items, but I won't leave it to the box to sell it to me.

 

 

Last but not least, we tackle the ROCCAT Sense – a 2mm thick mousepad added to the bundle we'll be looking at. Curled up in its box, the blue color peeks out the little window. It seems to be just a mousepad in a box, but it comes with quite the text on the box. I'll leave it to you to do all this reading.

 

ROCCAT Kone Pure Gaming Mouse Closer Look:

Moving on to more exciting things, like real pictures of what we're talking about, I pulled the Kone Pure out of its box. The mouse has a nice braided cable wrapped up neatly with a twist tie and a quick install guide to help you get going fast. After downloading the drivers from the ROCCAT Support page, I was ready to go. The mouse has a neat little ROCCAT logo on the bottom right edge of the mouse. It lights up in quite the range of colors and is hidden subtly under your hand. From the front, the mouse has the appearance of a lefty mouse in my opinion, but your hand kind of gets used to this odd shift. It seems almost normal without much use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The mouse is pretty sleek looking all around. It's matte black without the sticky flat coating and rather smooth to the touch. It's the same color all over, so there's no odd glossy button sticking out anywhere, just a bright blue ROCCAT logo on the left of the mouse, that somehow just fits in. The buttons on top of the mouse below the scroll wheel are the DPI setting buttons that toggle up and down in DPI. If you've ever owned a ROCCAT product before, you know that the software enables a real "tool" of a fool to announce the DPI setting as you scroll through them…"3200 DPI". Ahhh, the moments of scrolling through just to hear that stupid voice.

 

 

 

The bottom of the mouse has nice gliding feet on the top edge and bottom edge. It's just right for any moving around on almost any suface (though glass is never happy with any mouse). The bottom is also labeled with ROCCAT Kone so you can brag about exactly what you have – in case you can't remember what you bought. A metallic sticker sports the highest DPI setting of 8200 DPI.

The cable is a standard USB cable with a nicely cut out "ROCCAT" on it. With a braided cable and the nice quality of the line, it's quite easy to pull and plug without tearing things up (my poor iPad cable is falling apart). The lighting is pretty nice on the mouse as well, but unfortunately the center has an ultra-bright spot on it, despite the color choice. The nice thing is you can match it to anything with a full customizable RGB spectrum.

 

ROCCAT Kone XTD Gaming Mouse Closer Look:

Pulling out the next item, we've got the Kone XTD. At first glance, the Kone XTD has an eerie bit of de ja vu, and perhaps it's because it looks much like the Kone [+] I tested awhile back. It has the same lighting layout and almost the same basic premise overall; let's just hope this one works a little better.

The ROCCAT Kone also comes out of the box with a nice twist-tied braided cable to keep it neat and a quick-install guide. It also comes with a cool little box with added mouse weights; 5g each times four weights for a total of a 20 gram addition to the mouse. The front and back of the mouse look nearly identical to the Kone[+], but since that was never officially reviewed here at OCC, let's take another look. The ROCCAT logo that lit up on the Kone Plus now is just a silver outline. Instead, two strips up the left and right can shine brightly. Overall, the mouse is quite a bit bigger in size and goes back to the "his and hers" mice – this is definitely for the former. Bigger mouse for bigger hands – I don't have bigger hands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overall, the Kone XTD is about the same in appearance with some key subtle differences to the Pure; the glossy strips up the left and right and an extra button above the tilting scroll wheel. The same uber blue ROCCAT logo appears on the left of the mouse, but ultimately it's the same mouse in grander scale.

 

 

 

The bottom of the XTD is about the same as the Pure and to avoid redundancy with its appearance, I'll only mention the circular pod for the 20 grams of added weight. It twists off nicely to add or subtract weight and holds tightly between such events (no weights will fall out).

 

 

Plugged in without drivers, the mouse works and lights up nicely. By default it cycles through the RGB spectrum of colors along the left and right strips. It looks pretty nice and for you fat handers and lovers of the Logitech mice, this may be a new compromise to finding MX518 on eBay.

 

ROCCAT Apuri Mouse Bungee with Active USB Hub Closer Look:

Moving away from the mice and moving on to an accessory from ROCCAT, the Apuri Mouse Bungee finds its place on my desk. This one is a bit unique compared to others on the market, with the added USB ports involved. Unfortunately this increases the price to a pretty unbearable $40 for a silly mouse cable holder with a few USB ports – this thing better walk across my desk and do tricks for this price. This Apuri bungee comes with a quick start guide like the mice, as well as both a USB plug and power adapter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Looking at just the bungee, it's pretty neat looking. It has three locations for blue lighting on the top and four USB 2.0 ports for plugging in whatever you desire. The ROCCAT logo on top is a light gray, with a flat, rubbery black background that matches the mice. The bungee is rather bouncy, but the overall piece is solid and not separable like some others on the market.

 

 

Looking up close at the three sides of the Apuri mouse bungee, there are four USB 2.0 ports (two on two sides) and a power and USB connection on the third side for the real connections. The added power port provides extra power to the hub for whatever power sucking items you may have. It also provides power to light up the bottom light, which you'll see in the next set of images.

 

 

The bottom of the bungee has a ROCCAT logo (not that you'll be looking under here much) that lights up in a subtle blue. It adds a bit of glow to your desk, which can be either neat or annoying depending on what you are doing and the time of day. Plugging in both the USB connection and the added power, you can see the annoyance of added cables to this beast already. I'm really not looking forward to the mess on my desk – perhaps I'll use it as just a bungee, though it's a hell of a cost for just a bungee.

 

ROCCAT Sense Mousepad Closer Look:

Last and maybe not least, is the mousepad: the ROCCAT Sense. Rolled up in the cardboard tube, this 2mm thick, 400 x 280mm pad rolls out. The pictures on this page aren't funky from my camera, but rather because the mouspad has a funky bluish color. It isn't quite what is shown on the website and isn't really blue in color either. It's a big ROCCAT logo with bursting blue – there are a couple other options available, but nothing too plain (no solid colors).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The bottom of the pad is nice and grippy, at least on my glass desk – which most are, but this is only 2mm in thickness. It is almost like it isn't even there, which is a pro or con depending on what you prefer. There isn't much there for padding for those of you who like something squishy for your arm/wrist , but if you like something that is almost non-existent, this is it – for a certain price of course.

 

ROCCAT Software:

I'll start this page with an honest statement: ROCCAT software is... it just is. It kind of works, and when it does, it is exciting. But it has a lot of flaws with its attempts to outdo most companies' software options. You can expect the installer to crash, the software to crash, the software to crash while writing to your mouse, and you can expect random crashes. Just simply expect crashes from the start and you are good.

Anyway, moving on with the typical POS software, let's look at the setup for the Kone Pure. If you haven't heard of that horrid Easy-Shift[+] button, you might as well just run away now. For the Kone Pure, you must set button 4 or button 5 to this Easy-Shift button. Buttons 4 and 5 are what I would call your normal forward and back buttons under your thumb. Unfortunately, the way this awful setup is, you cannot have forward IE and back IE set up at the same time. Pick one or the other, you can't have both. This sucks. I complain about a lot of things, but this is one thing that really ticks me off – not being able to have a forward and back button beneath your thumb. Sure with a Shift option you could have it, but – that's just not normal. I don't like this…

These first few screen shots represent those for the Kone Pure mouse. The first shows off the sensitivity controls, the scroll wheel options, tilt speeds, and DPI settings for the various clicks up or down (if this is what you have your buttons set to). The second screen allows you to set your button clicks as well as your Shift buttons, which adds a complete second set of options to the mouse. Personally I hate being forced into having a Shift button placed and have no need for any "MMO" options and am sad to see no way to remove this forced Shift button on button 4 or 5. Sad Panda [insert sad panda image here].

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next pages allows for "Advanced Control", "Color Control", "RAD", and "Updating". The Advanced Control lets you set your X-Y sensitivities, tracking, sound feedback, and pointer speed. The Color Controls are pretty obvious; set whatever you want color-wise (even RGB values). Your RAD page displays your ROCCAT achievements display, with how many clicks you have per buttons and scroll sweeps as well. It's pretty neat and has some 13 trophy achievements you can earn based on your usage. The Update tab is most obvious in use – use it to update when new drivers or firmware are available.

 

 

 

The Kone XTD drivers/software are no better. The same issues of crashing during installation proceeded and crashes during the upgrading persisted as well. Mind my language, but this sucks. It installs nonetheless and works somewhat. The same screens are available for the XTD as the Pure with slightly different images for each screen to show the different mouse buttons. The images below show the same shots with the XTD.

 

 

 

 

Overall, the software will make you cranky. It's just that way -- well at least until ROCCAT decides to fix something. Comparing it to other mice/keyboard software on the market, it really is of poor quality. Corsair's software for the M90 or the software for the odd off-branded Meduza mouse still had better software than this. I guess the true quality of what the software can do is negated by the fact that it crashes every time you apply something new. So if you want to see your mouse in pink, then blue - expect a crash in between. It's just utterly amazing how poor this software is compared to some off the really crappy "Made in China" stuff you can buy.

ROCCAT Roundup Specifications and Features:

 

ROCCAT Kone XTD Gaming Mouse

Specifications:

Dimensions:
13.5 x 7.8 x 4 cm (L x W X H)
Weight:
123g (excl. cable) + 4 optional weights (5g each)
System Requirements:
Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8
USB 2.0 Port
Internet Connection for driver install
Sensor:
Pro-aim laser sensor R3 with up to 8200 DPI
Polling Rate:
1000Hz
Response Time:
1ms
Acceleration:
30G
Lift-off Distance:
1.5mm
Onboard Chip:
72MHz Turbo Core V2 32-bit Arm based MCU
Onboard Memory:
576kB
Cable Length:
1.8m (braided)

 

Features:

Information provided by: http://www.roccat.org/Products/Gaming-Mice/ROCCAT-Kone-XTD/#crb_2

 

 

ROCCAT Kone Pure Gaming Mouse

Specifications:

Dimensions:
7 x 12 cm (W X L)
Weight:
90g (excluding cable)
System Requirements:
Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8
USB 2.0 Port
Internet Connection for driver install
Sensor:
Pro-aim laser sensor R3 with up to 8200 DPI
Polling Rate:
1000Hz
Response Time:
1ms
Acceleration:
30G
Lift-off Distance:
1.5mm
Onboard Chip:
72MHz Turbo Core V2 32-bit Arm Based MCU
Onboard Memory:
576kB
Cable Length:
1.8m (braided)

 

Features:

Information Provided By: http://www.roccat.org/Products/Gaming-Mice/ROCCAT-Kone-Pure/

 

 

ROCCAT Apuri Mouse Bungee with Active USB Hub

Specifications:

Compatibility:
Works with all cable mice
Hub Size:
Maximum width/length: 13 x 6.5 cm
System Requirements:
Windows XP, Vista, Mac OS X
USB 2.0 Port (backwards compatible)
USB Ports:
4 USB 2.0
Active Power Output:
Using AC Adapter: 2A
Passive Power Output:
Using USB cable: 500mA
Length of USB Cable:
1.5m
Length of Power Cable:
1.5m
Number of Feet
3

 

Features:

Information Provided By: http://www.roccat.org/Products/Gaming-Accessories/ROCCAT-Apuri/


 

ROCCAT Sense Mousepad

Features:

Information Provided By: http://www.roccat.org/Products/Gaming-Mousepads/ROCCAT-Sense-Series/

ROCCAT Roundup Testing:

The ROCCAT bunch – two mice, bungee, and mousepad – were all definitely put through a stressful week or more of use and testing. During that time, it was used it in everyday use, surfing the Internet, Photoshopping, and of course some gaming. A mouse, bungee, or mousepad are each rather personal to each and every individual, so how it responds in these various tasks is important in different ways to everyone. This rather subjective review is best to provide you the feedback from use rather than assigning made up numbers trying to compare one mouse to another. It is pretty easy to distinguish the likes and dislikes of a mouse through words rather than leaving it to you to decide what a 7 or 8 really means. No guessing game – here is what I liked, here is what I hated. Hopefully these things can help decide what is right for you.

 

Testing Setup:

 

ROCCAT Kone XTD Gaming Mouse Testing:

Everyday Use:

Using a mouse every day to surf the net, check your email, or just read the news usually comes down to a preference in mouse size. The XTD is the larger mouse up for review today. It is very palm fitting and despite the appearance of a left-hand style, it really has a nice shape to hold. Personally, this mouse was a bit too big for my hands. It's a little closer to the size of your favorite Logitech MX518 (maybe a tad smaller) - which I honestly used to love. I've just become a little more accustomed to using smaller mice that fit my smaller hands. For everyday use, it's definitely great (mind the price). The same issue persists with not being able to change the "shift plus" button to something other than your typical back button. The scroll wheel is smoother than what you'll get with the Pure, but again a preference thing. It tracks well and gets the job done. It's usually not too hard to be good enough for everyday use...so it's a good start to not have failed yet. My only frustration honestly at this point is the inability to make the "shift plus" button something other than your typical back button - this puts quite a damper on Internet surfing. 

Working:

Using a mouse at work, or to do work on you home computer, often requires a lot of accurate clicking and decent tracking. There's nothing more frustrating than working an Excel sheet and continuing to click on the wrong cells all the time. The XTD does well again here, as I had no trouble navigating documents and getting some serious work done here at the house. The on-the-fly DPI settings manufacturers are moving to is quite nice when you are working back and forth between things that need a little more detail oriented positions and others that can easily be skimmed about. Over three monitors, the right DPI is easy to find - it was a pleasure working with the XTD.

Gaming:

Gaming again targets the accuracy and ability to direct your character with your mouse through whatever battle it may be. It also tests the ability to react to rapid changes in an environment and how well the mouse can line up a headshot for you. Unfortunately there isn't a mouse out there (that I've found) that helps you if you suck at headshots, but there are obviously mice that track on their own, making it a constant fight with yourself to get those kills. I'll have to say yet again that the XTD did alright in gaming. After I adjusted to the large size of the mouse, it wasn't too bad. Once I finally got my DPI settings correct (after fighting with the "friendly" software), I was decently satisfied. 

 

ROCCAT Kone Pure Gaming Mouse Testing:

Everyday Use:

The Pure is quite a bit different than the XTD despite it's smaller mockup of it's counterpart. It is smaller than the XTD by a reasonable amount and fits my little hands a bit better. If you are thinking of something to compare to, think more along the lines of perhaps the size of a Raxer DeathAdder (the original). It was more comfortable to me mostly due to size, but again personal preferences! The scroll wheel has a notch-ier feel to it and has that more satisfactory "click" to it as you roll up or down an email. It somewhat provides a more connected feel to your document, but is much more discrete than those of you who have continuous wheels. The software again was a pain, so fine tuning the exact DPI settings and everything to get a good feel took a little longer than I would have liked. Overall, like most mice, the Pure can handle surfing the net and reading emails! Congrats!

Working:

Being a little more fit to the Pure, I found working through documents and getting work done quite quick. It has about the same responses overall as the XTD itself - just fitting better. With the same sensor between the two mice, it's really no surprise that they perform about the same. Ultimately the choice between these two mice comes down to a question of size preference. 

Gaming:

Gaming with the Pure was good gaming. The response on the screen was almost exactly what I expected from my inputs. I'm a pretty crappy sniper, but at least I felt like I actually had control while playing this time around. The mouse doesn't track on it's own like some have in the past and overall I was quite satisfied with the outcomes. If the software wasn't so unfriendly, this would be an ultimate package!

 

ROCCAT Apuri Mouse Bungee with Active USB Hub Testing:

Everyday Use, Working, and Gaming:

So really, a mouse bungee works about the same whether you are using it for work, gaming, or just surfing the net; thus, I've mashed together the three categories for the Apuri Mouse Bungee. As the key feature of any bungee – the ROCCAT Apuri seems to hold your mouse cable up out of the way, unable to catch on your keyboard or any of the various things on your desk. It does have the added benefit of sporting four USB 2.0 ports to plug in either your mouse and keyboard or even just a USB stick. Unfortunately it comes with the annoyance of at least plugging in one more cable; it wasn't my favorite. The extra cables got annoying and I eventually just unplugged them both. I prefer my keyboard and mouse plugged into my motherboard anyway. The weight of the Apuri also didn't seem as substantial as some other bungees on the market, so when gaming, I had a little trouble dragging it about (I'm an angry gamer). Overall, it serves its purpose to hold your mouse cable, but the "bonus" of having a USB hub felt more of a problem than bonus.

 

ROCCAT Sense Mousepad Testing:

Everyday Use, Working, and Gaming:

A mousepad is also difficult to really point out many differences in gaming, working, or browsing the Internet; so I will again combine these categories for the purpose of not repeating myself too many times. Although there aren't a lot of differences to be found in the different uses of a pad, quick-paced gaming can really have a say in a mousepad being good enough. In this case, the Sense Mousepad didn't really seem to have any difficulties with what I threw at it. It being a rather thin pad, it was almost like using just your desk surface, but with a magical response from the mouse that allowed it to track.

ROCCAT Roundup Conclusions:

Overall, the goodies from ROCCAT were generally impressive, despite the daunting cost associated with buying a ROCCAT product. Both mice were well worth the extra penny, and having the different size options available literally at my fingertips was a great experience; size really does matter.
 

ROCCAT Kone XTD Gaming Mouse Conclusion:

The ROCCAT Kone XTD was a bit of a flash back to the previous ROCCAT Kone and Kone[+], with near identical looks and features. Its added weight kit and 4-LED lighting scheme allowed for a rather personalized setup. Unfortunately the software was the ultimate fail in both the XTD and Pure mice. The installer crashing while it installs and crashing while writing to the mouse are two major no-no's. That's the last thing I need to happen when I'm just trying to customize my mouse. I could deal without the flashy imagery as long as the mouse works and the settings I want to change actually send to the mouse. Despite my anger with the software, I ultimately enjoyed the XTD.

The size being larger wasn't much concern since it compared to my old friend, the MX-510. The ability to change colors and match the rest of my setup was a bonus when it worked and adds a bit to any office ambiance. The most frustrating thing was the inability to change the "shift plus" button to anything but the typical back button. The cost of the mouse is a little up there, but the build quality seems to be there. Costing less than the RAT mice and settling in just under an M95 from Corsair, the price is justly justified. It has a lot of features, and when the software works, there is a lot to customize. Overall I was okay with the mouse. I would pick the Pure over the XTD for two reasons: personal preference in size and the lower cost for ultimately the same thing.  

Pros:

Cons:

 

ROCCAT Kone Pure Gaming Mouse Conclusion:

The ROCCAT Kone Pure was the smaller of the two mice with a slightly lower price tag to go with it. Having small hands, I had a slight preference for this mouse over the XTD. With the software being identical, there was about an equal number of features to customize. Like the XTD, I was able to customize the color and location of all the buttons (except the shift button). I preferred the notchy scroll wheel, despite having removed the catch on my old mouse. The feet glide nicely on any mousepad and tracks reasonably well. The fit was by far my favorite, as I hate having my arm raised up just to use the mouse. The color is fun to play with, but again you must be rather patient with as often as the software crashes. Change might hold, but you will likely have to restart the software to make another change. I hope ROCCAT will take some time to bug fix. Ultimately the Pure was my favorite in the bunch of goodies; I hope the quality lasts. 

Pros:

Cons:

 

 

ROCCAT Apuri Mouse Bungee with Active USB Hub Conclusion:

I had been using the Skorpion mouse bungee from December and really have just been used to having one now. At work I have to tuck my mouse cable under the corner of one of my monitors, and it just isn't the same. The Apuri Mouse Bungee worked about the same as the Skorpion in principle. It is shaped a bit differently so it sits on my desk a little differently and who would have guessed…it being different makes it different.

On a serious note, it was nice having the USB ports right there on my desk. However, the extra cables associated with both having the USB hub as well as additional power to make the ports powered (two cables) was more annoying than the benefit of having the USB ports. I didn't like the dangling cables off the back and even just plugging in the USB (without the power plug) was too much for me. I honestly don't like cable mess – so having one more on my desk that is hard to hide wasn't a favorite of mine. The idea of having a mouse bungee is something I originally laughed off upon having the chance to review one the first time – now it is something I really just like having around.

Unfortunately this USB hub/bungee from ROCCAT comes at quite the cost. I'm not sure why the cost associated is near $40 USD as it doesn't come plated in gold or silver and doesn't provide much extra benefit to your desk other than holding a mouse cable and providing four standard 2.0 USB ports. For that amount of money, I can buy any USB hub with more than four USB 2.0 ports and tuck my mouse cable under my monitor – and go buy lunch. If you haven't jumped on the bandwagon for a type of bungee for your desk yet, the ROCCAT Apuri Bungee probably isn't what you want to go for. Even though it could serve as a USB hub, if you ended up not liking the bungee feel, it sure isn't worth it for the extra coin. Save yourself the hassle; grab a rock and some tape .

Pros:

Cons:

 

 

ROCCAT Sense Mousepad Conclusion:

Honestly, the ROCCAT Sense is a mousepad; there isn't a whole lot to say about that. It effectively works as a mousepad (no surprise) and honestly I feel this particular component really comes down to a user. If you don’t like thin mousepads, or particularly wide ones – then no, the Sense isn't for you. If you just want a pad that works – go to Walmart and spend $5 on a cheap pad. The Sense is a nice size for those like me, who tend to play all over rather than just in the center of a pad. However, the overall appeal of the Sense isn't really there. The poor color printing on the top of the pad, as well as this unfortunate ROCCAT tax we seem to be paying on all its products takes away any real benefit of buying this mousepad over any other like it.

Pros:

Cons: