Welcome Stranger to OCC!Login | Register

PowerColor Red Devil RX 480 8GB Review

   -   
» Discuss this article (9)

Lowest Prices

PowerColor Red Devil RX 480 8GB Conclusion:

Past history has shown that PowerColor's Devil series cards are pretty capable performers in their segment. For this generation, we see that the apple has not fallen far from the tree when you look at what kind of performance you get in the target resolutions for the RX 480. At 1920 x 1080, you get a card in the PowerColor Red Devil RX 480 8GB that can play pretty much any game out with excellent FPS results. At 2560 x 1440, the Red Devil RX 480 8GB is still going to deliver an engaging gaming experience, should you choose to play at that resolution. 4K gaming performance is going to be a stretch any way you go about it without stretching the budget to include a second card. If you are looking at gaming at a 4K resolution, you most likely are not shopping the sub $300 GPU market anyhow. Gaming performance compares most with the previous generation R9 390 and flirts with the performance delivered by the GTX 1060, mostly in the DX12-based games.

PowerColor's Red Devil RX 480 8GB comes from the factory with a 1330MHz boost clock that lets it deliver a nice performance boost over the reference cards right out of the gate. This gets the end user those extra few FPS for your video card dollar. If you are looking to gain some extra performance from overclocking, the PowerColor Red Devil RX 480 is equipped to do so with an all-digital 6+1 phase power circuit built with the company's Gold Power Kit components. An 8-pin power supply is used to ensure that input power is not a concern. To handle any overclocking and keep the Red Devil from overheating, the trio of 80mm Double Blade fans serve up not only an up to 20% increase in airflow, but push air through the whole of the area under the dual ball bearing equipped fans.

When it came time to overclock this card, it provides some real challenges when managing the power limits and the impacts to the final clock speeds. Ultimately, I was able to push the card to a 1370MHz boost clock speed on the core and 2180MHz on the GDDR5 memory to see some decent FPS gains in just about every game I tested. It takes some time to get the end result, but it is worth it. Pushing the clock speeds means increasing the fan speeds to maintain cooling performance and not limit your ultimate core clock speed. This creates additional noise by ramping up not two, but three fans. PowerColor's dual blade fans do not seem any louder than any other three fan cooling solution I have tested when the fan speeds are cranked up. If overclocking is not your idea of fun and you want the most cooling with the least noise, PowerColor can accommodate that request. When running in a 2D environment, the fans run in Zero RPM mode unless the GPU temperature hits the 50 °C target temperature in the stock profile. If you want to go even quieter under load, PowerColor equips the Red Devil RX 480 with a dual BIOS switch to run the fans in silent mode that reduces the clock speeds and thermal load. It works!

Priced at $279 from Newegg, PowerColor's Red Devil RX 480 8GB is price competitive with the rest of the RX 480 cards on the market. For that $279, you get a card that comes out of the blocks with one of the highest factory overclocked core clock speeds in the RX 480 market. As usual, you get a good looking card that is a full-on custom build with all the unique features PowerColor has to offer: a robust all-digital PWM, excellent cooling with robust back plate, and all the AMD built-in capabilities.

 

Pros:

  • Good looks
  • Gaming performance
  • Cooling
  • New fan design
  • Low noise (stock and low noise profile)
  • Overclocking

 

Cons:

  • Overclocking is challenging
OCC Gold



Related Products
Random Pic
© 2001-2017 Overclockers Club ® Privacy Policy
Elapsed: 0.0306429863   (xlweb1)