Welcome Stranger to OCC!Login | Register

PCMark 8 Review

Guest_Jim_*    -   June 13, 2013
Category: Software
» Discuss this article (7)

PCMark 8 Introduction & Closer Look:

There are certain companies that any computer enthusiast knows because of product reliability and quality. Among these is Futuremark, which makes the popular 3DMark ® and PCMark ® benchmarks, the latter of which will soon be celebrating a wide release of its newest version, PCMark 8, later this month. Because of the number of hardware launches coming in early June though, Futuremark has decided to ship the Professional Edition early for press and professional use. The Basic and Advanced Editions will be released later, when they are ready.

The PCMark benchmarks are designed to test the performance of computers with regards to the regular tasks of writing, web browsing, casual gaming, and more. PCMark 8, being the newest, has several new features, including tests for battery life and tests using select applications from Adobe and Microsoft. It has also departed from the standard of reporting a single score for a computer, instead giving the scores for the specific benchmarks it has, which I will return to later. For now, we are going to look at the different editions:

  • PCMark 8 Basic Edition – FREE
    • Complete performance measurement for your PC.
    • Includes Home, Creative and Work benchmarks.
    • Test everything from tablets to desktop PCs.
    • Easy to use, no technical know-how needed.
    • Free online account to manage your results.
    • A professional level tool now available for free!
  • PCMark 8 Advanced Edition - $49.95
    • Benchmark with Adobe & Microsoft applications.*
    • Test your SSDs and HDDs with the Storage test.
    • Measure the battery life of your tablet or notebook.
    • Run individual workloads to fine-tune your system.
    • Get in-depth hardware monitoring graphs.
    • Automatically save your results offline.
  • PCMark 8 Professional Edition - $1495.00
    • Licensed for business use.
    • Command line automation.
    • Additional Storage tests (coming soon)
    • Private offline results option.
    • Export results as XML.
    • Priority customer support.

"* PCMark 8 is compatible with Adobe Creative Suite 6, Adobe Creative Cloud, and Microsoft Office 2010 or later. Applications must be installed on your system to run the benchmark."

 

There are five benchmarks and 25 tests included with PCMark 8, with two more benchmarks and eight more tests dependent on the Adobe and Microsoft Office versions you have installed. As I do not have the compatible Adobe software, my system was only able to run the three additional Microsoft Office tests, which look at Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint performance. The different tests can be used by more than one benchmark, such as the Writing test, which is run in the Home, Creative, and Work benchmarks, though the Batch Photo Editing test is only used in the Creative benchmark.

The first benchmark listed is the Home benchmark, which tests your computer's ability to run certain common tasks. It includes the two Web Browsing tests, the Writing test, Photo Editing test, Video Chat test, and Casual Gaming test. This makes the test ideal for low-cost and low-power computers.

 

The Creative benchmark analyzes performance for entertainment and media tasks, such as editing and gaming. It uses the two Web Browsing tests; the Photo Editing and Batch Photo Editing tests; the Video Editing test; the Media To Go tests, which involve video and music; the Mainstream Gaming test; and the Video Group Chat test. The targets of this benchmark are mid to high-range computers.

 

The Office benchmark looks at a computer's performance for the tasks expected of a work computer. It only uses three tests: the two Web Browsing tests and the Writing test. No media tests are run as the typical office computer lacks those capabilities.

 

The Storage benchmark is to stress the drives connected to your computer, whether they are solid state drives, hard disk drives, or a hybrid design, and internal or external. Its tests use workload traces from Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe After Effects, World of Warcraft, and Battlefield 3. As these traces were recorded from the actual programs, they represent a real-world test, instead of synthetic statistics.

 

The new Applications benchmark will open compatible, installed software and run it through a sequence of tasks. The compatible software includes Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint from Microsoft Office 2010 or newer, and Adobe Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, and After Effects from Adobe Creative Suite 6 and Adobe Creative Cloud. The tasks these software are put through including opening a file, editing it, and then saving or exporting it.

 

Finally PCMark 8 also features a new 'Battery life' option, which loops the selected benchmark or test(s) until the computer's battery has less than 20% charge left. It can be connected to external instrumentation for use with third-party power measurement equipment.

As given earlier in the listings of the different edition features, the Storage and Applications benchmarks as well as the Battery life option are only available in the paid versions. This is not terribly surprising though as those three benchmarks are likely not going to be of much use to anyone outside of the hardware or news industry.

On the next page is the data on how my computer performed and its specs. An unfortunate issue complicates the data though, which will be explained.

PCMark® is a registered trademark of Futuremark Corporation.




  1. PCMark 8 Introduction & Closer Look
  2. PCMark 8 Testing Setup & Results
Random Pic
© 2001-2014 Overclockers Club ® Privacy Policy

Also part of our network: TalkAndroid, Android Forum, iPhone Informer, Neoseeker, and Used Audio Classifieds

Elapsed: 0.0246758461