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Patriot Viper 4 16GB PC4-24000 Review

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Patriot Viper 4 16GB PC4-24000 Testing:

Memory is often hard to separate from one kit to another in gaming, but when it comes to number crunching and computing, some memory provides an extra boost in comparison. To see just what kind of performance this kit has to offer, I will be running the modules through a series of benches to see just how they compare. Each kit will be tested at its native native speeds, as well as overclocked. Overclocking of course will be dependent on exactly how far the testing rig will allow, but I'll push it as far as I can. The testing setup used for these benchmarks is listed below with the XMP profile applied to show where the modules settle in at after training. The CPU will be run with default XMP settings for baseline testing and bumped up to 4.6GHz for OC testing, or as close as possible to that speed. All current updates and patches are installed for Windows 7 Professional 64-bit and the latest driver for the NVIDIA GTX 770 will be used.

 

Testing Setup: Intel Socket 2011 V-3

Comparison Modules:

 

CPU-Z: This application visually shows the settings that we have chosen in the BIOS. Items shown in this application include CPU speed and bus settings, motherboard manufacturer, BIOS revisions, memory timings, and SPD chip information.

CPU-Z

 

Task Manager: We use this utility to show physical memory, kernel memory, page file, and processor usage.

Task Manager

 

Overclocking:

Overclocking memory on Intels latest Haswell-E platform is a bit different than on the mainstream Haswell Z97 platform, but close enough to make it similar for the end user to navigate. The easiest way to set up the motherboard, at least the ASUS X99 board I am using, is to go into the BIOS and enable the XMP 2.0 profile and reboot. With that done the board sets up the rest of the parameters including changing the gear ratio to the 125MHz ratio to make it easier for the memory controller to handle the higher speed bin memory offerings on the market. Booting into the OS at this point is seamless. Overclocking these 3000MHz modules was a little bittersweet since the majority of the headroom was taken up to reach the speed bin of 3000MHz at 1.35v. Attempting to boot at 3200MHz was a no go from the start. Loosening up the primary timings did not net much head room either so I had to resort to turning the voltage up to 1.46v to get the 102MHz of margin left on this set while running at 3102MHz 16-17-17-36. Loosening the modules timings up further just gave up performance for a few more e-peen MHz results. Fun, but not really 24/7 usable.

Keeping the same 1.46v I decided to see if the modules would run any tighter primary timings. I quickly got the answer I was looking for with a bunch of failed boot warnings. I dropped the memory ratio down a bit to get the modules down in the 2750MHz range to see what they would do keeping that same maximum 1.46v. At 2750MHz I could run the modules at 14-15-15-29 with the CPU set at 4.65GHz, the modules were not to far off the Hyper Pi times of the modules running at 3102MHz 16-17-17-36. Still proves out the advantage that tighter timings and lower speed will deliver about the same performance as the higher running looser kit, at least in the Hyper Pi testing.

 

 

Maximum Memory Speed:

The maximum memory speed for each set of overclocked modules is indicative of how well the modules ran on this test system. As such, your results may differ in either a positive or negative way based on the capabilities of your hardware. In other words, your mileage may vary!

 

The benchmarks used in this review include the following:

Benchmarks:

  • PCMark 8
  • Geekbench 3
  • Hyper Pi 0.99
  • SiSoft Sandra 2014
  • X.264 5.1
  • AIDA64
  • Metro: Last Light



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