Welcome Stranger to OCC!Login | Register

Ozone Strike Pro Backlit Mechanical Gaming Keyboard Review

   -   
» Discuss this article (0)

Lowest Prices

Ozone Strike Pro Backlit Mechanical Gaming Keyboard: Closer Look Continued

Once the Strike Pro is removed from the box, it's clear that the picture matches the product, which is always a good thing. The keyboard itself is of a standard design and isn't much bigger than those generic ones you get with a pre-built system. This includes a top row of Function keys that double as second functions, along with the 10-key on the right. However, a few noticeable differences include backlit keys and macros set above the arrow keys. The compact keyboard is a bit different than the normal gaming ones, as most tend to be a bit bulky with dedicated macros and more options above the Function keys. This is something to think about when it comes to space, as it's always a trade off between convenience and space.

 

 

The USB and Audio Hub is placed on the right side above the Ozone logo. This allows for a mouse and audio to be connected through the keyboard, if that is your preference. Generally I usually use the USB ports on keyboards for flash drives more than anything else. This keyboard, however, does require plugging the audio cables into the motherboard to act as a pass-through, but the USB does not require any extra connectors.

 

 

Popping the keys off reveals MX Cherry Brown switches as checked off on the box. Above each key is a little white LED light, which is quite bright when the keys are removed. As explained on the first page, the Brown switches give a tactile response and little noise unless you slam the keys down. This is great for an overall keyboard and generally many peoples' first choice when switching to mechanical.

 

Across the top of the keyboard are Function keys that double as media and internal settings, like polling rate. The center and left are the media keys, like playback and volume controls. These secondary functions can be activated by holding down the Ozone logo found next to the Alt key on the left side and pressing the corresponding Function key.

 

 

Moving right along, next to the Ozone logo is the last bit of double action keys. These include brightness controls, Game Mode to disable the Windows key, and above that are the six macro key that can be set up to your liking via software.

 

The bottom portion of the keyboard has a built-in wrist support that is non-removable. On the left side is the Strike Pro logo letting everyone know what keyboard you have, although this does not light up with everything else.

 

Flipping over the keyboard, you can see ability to route the USB cable either left, right, or down the center. This helps a bit when it comes to cable organization and avoids potential issues, like bending or breaking the lead coming out. I've seen a few nice keyboards become ruined when the cable popped off from constantly moving. Now most people do not move the keyboard around a lot, but those who do will be happy that Ozone makes sure the lead is a little bit back to avoid damage.

 

Getting a few accurate representations of the keyboard with lights on took a bit of work, but I was finally able to get it with some tweaking. When the keyboard is fully lit under normal lighting, it has a slight glow under each key. It can be hard to see anything lit besides the top row and red keys sometimes. I've become accustom to them being on all the time that I usually forget until the red keys catch my eye. The keyboard itself has a few lighting options from full 100% brightness, seen in the first photo, all the way to pulsing. Then of course the strange setting of just lighting the WASD+QE keys that are way overpowering with the lights off and the red keys cannot be dimmed. Ozone has the right idea, but i think it needs a bit of tweaking to allow for everyone's tastes.

 

 




Related Products
Random Pic
© 2001-2017 Overclockers Club ® Privacy Policy
Elapsed: 0.0366308689   (xlweb1)