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Kingwin F-35 Review

tacohunter52    -   August 27, 2009
Category: Storage / Hard Drives, Hard Drive Cooling
Price: $39.99
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Introduction:

In the real world, it can be hard finding places to store things. However, in the PC world, storage comes cheap and easy. The hard part is finding places to put your terabytes of data. No, I don't mean it's hard to find 80TB hard drives. That would be impossible today, because to the best of my knowledge they don't currently make those. What I mean is, it's hard to find places to put your multitude of hard drives. Motherboards these days only come with a limited amount of SATA ports. Once those are all used up, you'll have to find another way to add storage space to your rig. Even more limiting than that is the amount of HDD bays with which your case is equipped.

So what do you do when you're out of space to put additional hard drivees? "Space.. the never ending frontier..." Well there's always external enclosures for your HDDs. Some external enclosures use e-SATA ports, but most still use USB 2.0. Kingwin's F-35 uses the latter. Will using an external enclosure like the F-35 decrease the performance you'd otherwise get from using a standard SATA port? Probably... but is it going to matter? Let's find out.

Closer Look:

Packaging is always important, and it serves a few purposes. My personal favorite thing about packaging is what I call the "Christmas Illusion." Companies have become so good at making packaging for its products, it's like Christmas when you open them. Sometimes the product packaging is so nice, you forget how much money you spent on it in the first place. The box the F-35 came in was wrapped in clear plastic, which is clever because it allows you to see all the information on the box, while protecting the box from getting scratched. The front of the box shows a side view of the F-35, Kingwin's logo, and the words "Beyond Capacity." I found that interesting, because technically the F-35 has a capacity of zero. The back of the box shows the F-35's rear end, as well as some specifications and features.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The two sides of the box follow the same scheme as the front and back of the box. They're both black and yellow like a bumblebee, which is actually kind of cool. Both sides feature a shot of the F-35's front, though one of these pictures is slightly angled. This shows you the color scheme of the F-35, which justs happens to be black and white.

 

 

The top of the box is completely black except for the Kingwin logo. Opening the top flap of the box reveals the F-35 in its protective packaging. You actually can't see much of the F-35 because it is covered in protective foam. On top of this foam is the USB cable you'll use to connect the F-35 to your computer, as well as the wall wart that will provide power to the F-35, and the HDD located inside it.

 

 

Removing the F-35 shows us that Kingwin took another measure at protecting its product. The F-35 is completely covered in plastic, which serves two important purposes. The first is that it prevents the G-35 from getting scratched during shipment. The second thing is that the plastic will ensure you'll receive the F-35 shiny and fingerprint free. That is, at least until you remove the plastic.

 

 

Now that we've seen the F-35's packaging, let's take a closer look at the F-35.




  1. Introduction & Closer Look
  2. Closer Look (Continued)
  3. Specifications & Features
  4. Testing
  5. Conclusion
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