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Intel 8th Generation Core i7 8700K & Core i5 8400 Review

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Intel 8th Generation Core i7 8700K & Core i5 8400 Testing:

Running a processor through a series of workloads can give us an indication of just how it will perform when compared to other processors and platforms. I will be running Intel's Core i7 8700K and Core i5 8400 and comparison products through OCC's test suite of benchmarks, which include both synthetic benchmarks and real-world applications. The gaming tests will also consist of both synthetic benchmarks and actual gameplay, in which we can see if similarly prepared setups offer any performance advantages. The system will receive a fully updated, fresh install of Windows 10 Professional 64-bit edition, in addition to the latest chipset drivers for each board and GeForce drivers for the NVIDIA GTX 1080 8GB Founders Edition. To ensure as few variables as possible, all hardware will be tested at their stock speeds, timings, voltages, and latencies, unless otherwise stated. After stock speed testing, each processor will then be overclocked as much as possible, while still maintaining full stability.

Testing Setup: Intel Socket 1151 Z370 Based

  • Processors: Intel Core i7 8700K, Intel Core i5 8400
  • CPU Cooling: Liquid cooling = EK Block and 360mm Radiator, D5 pump
  • Motherboard: MSI Z370 Gaming Pro Carbon AC
  • Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 3600MHz 32GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA GTX 1080 8GB Founders Edition
  • Power Supply: Corsair RM1000x
  • Hard Drive: Corsair Force GT 240GB SATA 3
  • Optical Drive: Lite-On Blu-ray
  • Case: Corsair 780T
  • OS: Windows 10 Professional 64-bit

 

Testing Setup: Intel Socket 2066 18 & 16 Core

  • Processors:  Intel Core i9 7980XE, Intel Core i9 7960X
  • CPU Cooling: Liquid cooling = EK Block and 360mm Radiator, D5 pump
  • Motherboard: MSI X299 Xpower AC
  • Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 3600MHz 32GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA GTX 1080 8GB Founders Edition
  • Power Supply: Corsair RM1000x
  • Hard Drive: Corsair Force GT 240GB SATA 3
  • Optical Drive: Lite-On Blu-ray
  • Case: Corsair 780T
  • OS: Windows 10 Professional 64-bit

 

Testing Setup: Intel Socket 2066

Testing Setup: AMD AM4 Ryzen 5

  • Processors: AMD Ryzen R5 1600X, R5 1500X
  • CPU Cooling: Wraith Max
  • Motherboard: ASUS B350 Prime Plus
  • Memory: Geil EVO X 3200MHz 16GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA GTX 1080 8GB Founders Edition
  • Power Supply: Corsair RM1000x
  • Hard Drive: Corsair Force GT 240GB SATA 3
  • Optical Drive: Lite-On Blu-ray
  • Case: Corsair 780T
  • OS: Windows 10 Professional 64-bit

Testing Setup: AMD AM4 Ryzen 7

  • Processors: AMD Ryzen R7 1800X, R7 1700X, R7 1700
  • CPU Cooling: Corsair H110i
  • Motherboard: Gigabyte AX370-Gaming 5 Aorus
  • Memory: Corsair Vengeance 3000MHz 16GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA GTX 1080 8GB Founders Edition
  • Power Supply: Corsair RM1000x
  • Hard Drive: Corsair Force GT 240GB SATA 3
  • Optical Drive: Lite-On Blu-ray
  • Case: Corsair 780T
  • OS: Windows 10 Professional 64-bit

 

Testing Setup: Intel Z270

  • Processors: Intel 7th Generation Core i7 7700K
  • CPU Cooling: Corsair H115i
  • Motherboard: MSI Z270 SLI Plus
  • Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 3600MHz 32GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA GTX 1080 8GB Founders Edition
  • Power Supply: Corsair RM1000x
  • Hard Drive: Corsair Force GT 240GB SATA 3
  • Optical Drive: Lite-On Blu-ray
  • Case: Corsair 780T
  • OS: Windows 10 Professional 64-bit

 

Testing Setup: Intel (Socket 1151)

 

Testing Setup: Intel (Socket 1150)

 

Testing Setup: AMD (Socket AM3+)

 

Overclocking:

  • Intel Core i7 8700K @ 4862MHz 101.3 x 48  1.25v
  • Intel Core i5 8400 @ 4040MHz 40 x101 MHz 1.10v

 

Overclocking an unlocked Intel processor has not changed much over the past few years. Well, other than using gear ratios to jump the bclock up higher in large blocks rather than a few MHz at a time. New to the fold is per core overclocking that allows the end user to use Intel's Turbo Boost tech to find the best couple cores on the processor and overclock them to higher levels than you can when you are held back by the weakest link on the silicon. This helps in applications where using just a couple cores can be beneficial.

Intel's Coffee Lake architecture is touted as being a healthy overclocking chip in its own right, so I wanted to see where it would run with a full six-core overclock versus the per core overclocking. To do this, I used the same methodology I have used to overclock Intel processors over the past several generations. Generally, I start by bumping up the bclock multiplier until the system fails to boot. In this case, I skipped all the ramp up that I have been using based on what I have seen with Kaby Lake and Skylake processors, slammed the bclock multiplier to 52, and found the Core i7 8700K would boot into Windows. Bonus! Out of the box and right to 5200MHz with the XMP profile applied. I started thinking I was onto something, but throwing a load on the CPU quickly caused a crash.

I found out that an overclock over 5.0GHz on all cores was not going to happen, but between 4800 and 4900MHz was the sweet spot for this Core i7 8700K. Well, after setting the load line calibration to Mode 1 and applying a voltage of 1.25v in the Click BIOS. I finally settled at 4862MHz by setting the bclock multiplier to 48 and bumping the bclock up to 101.3MHz. Not stellar when you look at the Turbo Boost clock speeds of 4.7GHz on a single or pair of cores that are lightly loaded. However, this clock speed proved stable, but did get a bit warm even with a full-on liquid cooling system. Temperatures in the 90 °C range were not uncommon in some of the more demanding loads. A bit more tuning time on the voltage would surely reduce the thermals.

Now, looking at the Core i5 8400 you know up front that this is a locked multiplier CPU. To an extent. As a factory locked processor there was not a lot of work you can do to get more performance out of it. With a base speed of 2.8GHz out of the box and a 4.0GHz maximum Turbo Boost clock speed, I felt there might be a little something on the table. I started by going into the BIOS and set the multiplier to 40 and started bumping up the bclock. I quickly found a wall that I could not successfully boot from and was stuck at my initial settings, which ended up giving you a small 1MHz boost on the bclock or about 40MHz in the operating system depending on the load imparted on the CPU. Although it was not much of a gain, it was measurable in most of the tests.

Overclocking the 8700K will easily give you a bump in performance with an all-core bump of 1.2+GHz over the baseline core clock speeds if you take your time to tune it. If you want to push a little harder for single core performance, you can do so with per core overclocking. The Core i5 8400 is not going to get you much, but you can gain a little bit more performance for a few minutes' work.

 

 

 

Maximum Core Clock Speed:

Each CPU has been tested for stability at the listed overclocked speeds. These clock speeds will represent the level of performance shown by the overclocked scores in the testing.

 

 

Benchmarks:

  • Scientific & Data:
  1. Apophysis
  2. WinRAR
  3. Bibble 5
  4. Office 2016
  5. POV-Ray 3.7
  6. HandBrake 1.0
  7. Sandra 2016
  8. AIDA64
  9. Cinebench R15
  10. X.265 Benchmark
  11. PC Mark 8
  • Video:
  1. Tom Clancy's The Division
  2. Hitman (2016)
  3. 3DMark



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