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Inno3D Geforce GT 220 Review

ccokeman    -   November 19, 2009
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Conclusion:

Clearly the GT 220 is not designed to give you the best gaming experience, but to allow those that spend 4 to 500 dollars on a system to enhance their graphics capabilities without spending half the cost of the system on a discrete video card. That does not mean that it cannot game, it just means you are limited in the settings and resolutions you can realistically play at. 1280x1024 should not pose any significant troubles while some of the games are playable even higher. Gaming again is not the intention for this card. It is meant to give the mainstream user who uses the computer to encode those hours of home video and the multitude of family pictures. There are plenty of applications available that enable Cuda enabled GPUS to excel at these tasks. You have Badaboom, vReaveal, Loiloscope, Photoshop and more. While the Palit sample I tested overclocked well the inno3D version reached that level and kept on going up to 799Mhz on the core, 1739Mhz on the shader cores and 1030Mhz on the memory. What this did was open up some much needed performance in games that will translate into better performance in the mainstream application usage as well. In my testing I was concerned that the smallish cooler would pose a problem but even when overclocked the temperatures never exceeded 56 degrees Celsius. The lower power consumption of this card transfers right over to lower temperatures. When I tested the Palit GT 220 I was pushed for time and did not have the opportunity to test how the GT 220 perfromed when added in as a card to do the Physx calculations. Well this time around, I went and put this card in with at GTX 285 as the primary GPU and the GT 220 as the Physx card and saw a net decrease in performance in Darkest of Days - something I really was not expecting! I lost between 2 and 3 FPS during my testing.

If you take a look at the increased performance brought to the table by overclocking, the GT 220 has a hard time competing with the performance delivered by the HD 4670 that is offered in the same price bucket at 65 to 79 dollars. This price point makes it a hard sell for those looking for an inexpensive gaming card. But this card was not built to push those limits, but to do the work that many a soccer mom does to preserve the family history in a digital format, convert media to a format usable by portable devices, or to clean up those shaky family movies. The GT 220 does these tasks well, with a little bit of light gaming thrown in for good measure. After seeing the things that the GPU is doing at the Nvidia GPU technology conference, the sky is the limit. If you can save time doing these time intensive tasks, that leaves you more time to create more memories!

 

Pros:

  • Impressive overclocking
  • Good cooling
  • Mainstream use
  • Video and image editing
  • Cuda capable
  • Power consumption

 

Cons:

  • Price
  • PhysX liability with high-end cards

 

OCC Bronze



  1. Introduction & Closer Look
  2. Closer Look (The Video Card)
  3. Closer Look (Drivers & Programs)
  4. Specifications & Features
  5. Testing: Setup & Overclocking
  6. Testing: Far Cry 2
  7. Testing: Crysis Warhead
  8. Testing: Darkest of Days
  9. Testing: Call of Duty World at War
  10. Testing: Warhammer 40,000 Dawn of War II
  11. Testing: Batman Arkham Asylum
  12. Testing: Resident Evil 5
  13. Testing: Left 4 Dead
  14. Testing: 3DMark 06
  15. Testing: 3DMark Vantage
  16. Conclusion
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