Inno3D GeForce GT240 Review

gotdamojo06 - 2009-12-01 11:19:59 in Video Cards
Category: Video Cards
Reviewed by: gotdamojo06   
Reviewed on: January 4, 2010
Price: $104.95

Introduction:

Are you looking for a new video card for your current system? Maybe you are turned off by the high prices of $400+ for the bleeding edge performance and don't know where to look after that? Well Inno3D has a GeForce GT240 that may just be what you are looking for. This card is going to be able to give you the graphics performance to play most games at lower resolutions and lowered settings with a lower demand on power and giving you a lower heat amount. The GT240 is also perfect for pairing up with a more powerful card and being used as a Phys-X rendering card. Maybe games are not the reason that you are looking at getting a new card and you need something that is going to be able to work with software and lower the time it takes to encode HD video or images? This card can do that too, with the CUDA cores it has packed inside. Whatever your reason for a new card, you may just want to check out the Inno3D GeForce GT240.

Closer Look:

The front of the packaging for the Inno3D GeForce GT240 displays a warrior with a sward in his hand in his battle gear, giving you the impression that the card is ready for battle with any other card in its class. The top right hand corner of the box is where you are going to find the Inno3D logo printed. Along the left-hand side going up, is the Inno3D logo printed in large letters as well. There is the 'nVIDIA Authorised' badge, along with the HDMI and Windows 7 badges printed on the front of the package above the sticker letting you know that the card is a 240 with 512MB of GDDR5 memory. Along the bottom of the front-side is where you are going to find the nVIDIA GeForce CUDA badge as well. Taking a look at the back of the package, you are going to find the slogan "Every PC needs good graphics" with a paragraph explaining the need for lower end graphics cards. There are three pictures on the back of the package showing you that the card will give you gorgeous graphics, fantastic video, and premium Windows 7 experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once you open up the package, you are going to see a brown box that houses the Inno3D GT240 card along with the Installation Kit. The Installation Kit is where you are going to find the CD that has the drivers you need to install on your computer for the card to properly work, as well as some extra bundled software that you can install if you wish. Inno3D did pack the GT240 nice and safely inside of the brown box that is going to keep it from being damaged while it was being shipped and they also they decided to put it in an anti-static bag, which protects it further during the shipping process and when the consumer gets the package.

 

Even though there were no accessories with the Inno3D GT240, that does not alone mean the card is not worth getting. Now that we know how the card is packaged, it's time to take a nice close look at the card itself.

Closer Look:

When you pull the card out of the packaging and the anti-static bag, two things stood out to me. The first being the fact that the PCB of the card is green! It has been a while since I have seen anything with green PCB. However, the second thing that pops out at me is the large heatsink/fan setup on the GPU to keep the core temps inline with standards. The Inno3D GeForce GT240 comes clocked in at 550MHz on the GPU and 1400MHz on the 512MB of GDDR5 memory. There is also a total of 96 processor cores or CUDA cores on the card, which are going to help further your graphics rendering power. The heatsink/fan setup that Inno3D has placed on the GT240 is quite large and does cover about half of the card, which is going to not only cool the core and the memory modules, but it might just help keep the voltage regulators on the card cool as well. The heatsink stands tall, so make sure that you are going to be able to hold a dual slot card depending on how your motherboard is set up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Inno3D GT240 has three different ways that you can connect a display to the card. The first of these is the new standard of a DVI output, however being a lower-end card, there is also an analog display port. There also is a HDMI connector on the face-plate of the GT240, so this is going to be very helpful for anyone either building a HTPC. The card does get installed in a PCI-E 2.0 slot, so you do need to make sure that your motherboard can support this video card before attempting.

 

When you pull the heatsink/fan off of the card, you are left with the core and the memory modules showing. The core as you can see is the GT215-450-A2 and the memory modules are by Samsung.

 

The heatsink that is installed on the Inno3D GT240 is a very unique looking heatsink. It packs a white fan in the middle of an array of fins that all spread out from the center base of the cooler. The fan is going to bring cool air inward towards the core and blow through the fins taking the heat with it.

 

Now that we know how the card is set up and how it looks, it's time to get the drivers and software installed and take a look at how it is going to compare to the other cards in its class.

Closer Look:

When you place the installation disc in your computer, you are going to find that the NVIDIA GeForce CD Drivers & Manual display will appear. From here you are given the choice to install the drivers, view the manual, or install Badaboom or vReveal. When you choose to install the drivers and follow all of your pop-up prompts, you will need to restart the computer to be able to continue installing the extra software that is packed with the card. Once you have everything installed, you are ready to start using your card as some extra processing power.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Once everything is installed, you can go into the nVidia control panel to play around with the different 3D settings of your card. Badaboom and vReveal are the two added pieces of software from Inno3D with their GT240. Though you are only given trial versions of these two pieces of powerful video encoding applications, they do show off the power of the CUDA cores and the raw computing power a graphics card can help with. You can read more about Badaboom 1.1.1 here and Motion DSP vReveal here.

 

 

 

Now that we know what kind of software is packaged with the GT240, it's time to take a look at the specifications of the card.

Specifications:

 

Model
240
Process technology
40nm
Processor Cores
96
Memory Amount
512MB
Memory Interface
128bit
DRAM type
GDDR5
Graphics Clock
550MHz
Memory Clock
1400MHz
Video Support
DVI, Analog, HDMI

 

Features:

 

All information Courtesy of Inno3D @ http://www.inno3d.com/products/graphic_card/gtx200/gt240.html

Testing:

Testing the Inno3D GT 240 is not a challenge, so much as trying to find out what kind of gaming performance this card is capable of delivering. The computing attributes make it a card that will help improve the everyday experience of a computer for the mainstream user. To test out the GT 240 gaming credentials, I will run the card through the OverclockersClub suite of benchmarks, but you know it won't be able to deliver playable frame rates at the settings I use, so I will reduce the settings to a level that gives an expectation of playability. In reality, this card will most likely find its home in a mainstream computer with a 17" to 19" LCD panel in a home office or in the family computer. Testing will be limited from 1280x1024 up to 1920x1200, with the revised settings listed at the top of each game page. 1280x1024 should be playable in all of the games in the suite, so let's get to it and see if we can make it playable. Of course, overclocking will be part of the exercise. The drivers used for this test will be Catalyst 9.10 for all ATI cards and 191.07 for the nVidia cards.

 

Comparison Video Cards:

 

Overclocking:

Overclocked settings:

When it came down to overclocking the Inno3D GeForce GT240, I was quite surprised as to how high I was able to get the clock speeds in comparison to the stock speeds. I was able to see a 24% increase on the GPU and 34% on the memory. It was not too painfully hard to overclock the card either, but it does require some time and patience, unlike overclocking an ATI card when it can be as simple as clicking a button and walking away and letting it overclock itself. With the GT240, it needed to be overclocked somewhat like a processor and raise the MHz of your Core and Memory (at separate times) by 10 and test, and continue the process until it was unstable in the benchmarking.

 

  1. Far Cry 2
  2. Crysis Warhead
  3. Darkest of Days
  4. Call of Duty World at War
  5. Warhammer 40,000 DOW II
  6. Batman: Arkham Asylum
  7. Resident Evil 5
  8. Left 4 Dead
  9. 3DMark 06 Professional
  10. 3DMark Vantage

Testing:

Far Cry 2:

Featuring a new game engine named Dunia, this game looks to be another one to stress your video card. Built especially for Far Cry 2, this engine allows for real time effects and damage. This next generation First Person Shooter comes to us from Ubisoft surprisingly - not from Crytek. The game is set in a war-torn region of Africa where there is a non-existent central government and the chaos that surrounds this type of social environment. If you have seen the movie Blood Diamond, you know the setting. Ubisoft puts the main story line of the game into focus with these statements: "Caught between two rival factions in war-torn Africa, you are sent to take out "The Jackal," a mysterious character who has rekindled the conflict between the warlords, jeopardizing thousands of lives. In order to fulfill your mission you will have to play the factions against each other, identify and exploit their weaknesses, and neutralize their superior numbers and firepower with surprise, subversion, cunning and, of course, brute force." In this version of the game, you don't have the beautiful water, but instead the beauty and harshness of the African continent to contend with. Most games give you a set area that can be played through, while Ubisoft has given the gamer the equivalent of 50km2 of the vast African continent to explore while in pursuit of your goals. The settings used are just a few steps below the maximum in-game settings and offer a good blend of performance vs. visual quality.

 

Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The only two cards that were able to beat the GT240 in this benchmark were the BFG GTS 250 Overclocked and the ASUS HD4770 Formula by around 15 fps when the 240 was overclocked.

Testing:

Crysis Warhead is a standalone expansion pack situated in time with the story line of the original Crysis. As Sergeant "Psycho" Sykes, you have a secret mission to accomplish on the far side of the island. Along the way there are EMP blasts and aliens to contend with, as you hunt down the KPA chief. This game uses an enhanced version of the CryEngine 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When it came down to stock speeds in the Crysis benchmark, the 240 was able to beat out the overclocked 220 by Palit and only losing to the the same two cards as before - the BFG 250 OC and the ASUS HD4770.

Testing:

What would testing be if you did not show both sides of the fence? In this test, PhysX was set to low, while leaving the remaining settings intact. You have seen time and again where the ATI cards suffer when PhysX is enabled. Mirror's Edge and Cryostasis are two prime examples. Darkest of Days is no different. What happens in this test shows that, although the game can be played by cards from the red team, the video effects and quality are diminished.

Game Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Inno3D GT240 was unable to keep up with the marjority of the cards in the Darkest of Days benchmark and the Sapphire HD4670 was able to beat it even at overclocked settings.

Testing:

Activision's Call of Duty: World at War goes right back to the bread and butter of the franchise - WWII FPS action. In this rendition, you start off in the South Pacific and move through a series of missions that flip back and forth between the Russian front and the island hopping advance toward the Imperial Japanese homeland. Included is a mission on Peliliu Island, arguably one of the more difficult and costly battles in the Pacific theater. The gameplay in the single player mode is rather short, but the game makes up for this shortcoming in online gameplay. If you thought CoD4 looked nice, this game is amazing with the graphics maxed out playing at a high resolution. I will use Fraps to measure a section of gameplay in the Semper Fi map on Makin Island to compare the performance of these video cards.

Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


At the highest resolution, the GT240 by Inno3D was able to catch up to the ASUS HD4770 and was only beaten by 4 fps when it was overclocked. However still fell short of the GTS 250 OC by BFG.

Testing:

Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War II is a Real Time Strategy game that is significantly different than its predecessor, with improved AI and an improved physics engine. You can play either as a single player in campaign mode, or in a multiplayer game where Microsoft's Live ranking system can be used.

Settings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The GT240 was still unable to beat the HD4770 or the GTS 250 OC in the Dawn of War II benchmark, except for at the 1920x1200 resolution when the BFT GTS 250 OC just couldnt handle the pressure.

Testing:

Batman: Arkham Asylum is a new game that brings together two bitter foes, the Joker and Batman. The Joker has taken over Arkham Asylum, Gotham's home for the criminally insane. Your task is to reign the Joker back in and restore order. This game makes use of PhysX technology to create a rich environment for you to ply your trade.

Game Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Batman benchmark really did some damage to the GT240. It lost some ground to the other cards here, including the Inno3D GT220 which was able to beat the 240 at the 1280x1024 test.

Testing:

Resident Evil 5 is the sequel to one of the best selling video games of all time. You play the game as Chris Redfield, a survivor of the events at Raccoon City, who now works for the BSAA. Sent to Africa to find the genesis of the latest Bio Organic agents, you meet up with another BSAA operative and work together to solve the problem. The game offers incredible 3D effects and a co-op gaming style.

Game Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Resident Evil 5 benchmark did allow the Inno3D GT240 to make up for some of the other benchmarks. It was able to do quite well, even at the stock speeds against the other cards.

Testing:

Left 4 Dead from Valve, leaves you as part of a group of survivors in a world where an infection has rapidly turned the populace into a zombie horde. You goal is to make it to a rescue point, all the while fighting what seems like overwhelming odds. Along the way there are safe houses where you can replenish your weapons and health. The movie 'I Am Legend' comes to mind to set the stage for this game. But unlike the movie, there are four characters and not just a lone gun and his faithful companion. The horde is not at all like the typical slow walking, foot shuffling zombie. These zombies are quick and work with the pack mentality. Your job: survival!

Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the settings lowered down to a level that is playable, the GT 220 will let you take care of your zombie killing urges all the way up to 1920x1200. The HD 4670 out-performs the GT 220 by a wide margin here.

Testing:

3DMark06 is one of the benchmarks that always comes up when a bragging contest has begun. 3DMark06 presents a severe test for many of today's hardware components. Let's see how this setup fares. The settings we will use are listed below.

 

Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Even during the synthetic benchmarking, you are able to see that the Inno3D GT240 falls short of the HD4770 and the GTS250.

Testing:

Featuring all-new game tests, this benchmark is for use with Vista based systems. "There are two all-new CPU tests that have been designed around a new 'Physics and Artificial Intelligence-related computation.' CPU test two offers support for physics related hardware." There are four preset levels that correspond to specific resolutions. 'Entry' is 1024x768 progressing to 'Extreme' at 1920x1200. Of course, each preset can be modified to arrange any number of user designed testing. For our testing, I will use the four presets at all default settings.

Settings:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The GT240 takes the number one spot at the 1280x1024 test when it was overclocked, but falls back down the third in the rest of the tests.

Conclusion:

The Inno3D GeForce GT240 video card was able to perform quite well when it was put up against some of the cards in its class, including coming very close to the ASUS HD4770 Formula in most of the testing once the GT240 was overclocked. I was quite surprised to see that the GT240 with its specifications was able to come so close to the HD4770. The other great aspect of the GT240 was the fact that the heat that it generated during the testing was quite low, as I never saw it get much over 50°c, which for a video card, is very low. When it comes to using the card as a performance booster in 3D applications such a Photoshop, Badaboom or any other application that takes advantage of GPU rendering, you will definitely notice a difference in the rendering times with this card as opposed to using only the processor to edit images or video. The overall performance that the card was able to give me during the testing was quite impressive. However, for a price tag of $104.95, I would prefer spending my money on something a little more powerful. This is most likely because I do not have any need for a low end card and when I game, it is with a high performance setup. However, if you are looking for a new video card that is going to be able to give you enough performance to play just about any game that you want to play on lower settings and a lower resolution (1280x1024), I would suggest you take a look at this card as a serious candidate. If you are looking to build an HTPC that is going to be able to play HD video, you may also want to look at the Inno3D GT240, as it is going to be able to deliver great looking video over an HDMI cable without using any dongles.

 

Pros:

 

Cons: