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Coolit ECO A.L.C. Review

ccokeman    -   April 12, 2010
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Conclusion:

The Coolit ECO A.L.C does the job it is intended to do, to cool your CPU and do it quietly. Throughout my testing, I never saw temperatures higher than 71° when I ratcheted up the voltage on the CPU to 1.31v and bumped the clock speed up to a easy overclock to put a heavier load on the ECO. This of course was after the standard testing was completed. During the standard testing, the stock clocked results were right in line with some mid to high end air cooling solutions and really only performed at a lower level than the three upper echelon heat sinks, two of those with dual fans to up the cooling ante. While comparing this cooling solution to a heat sink that is factory equipped with dual fans may seem unfair, you can add a second fan to the ECO A.L.C.. Doing this will show a measurable decrease in CPU temperatures as a nice performance bonus, not huge, but measurable. The load temperatures for the ECO under load when at stock clock speeds was a respectable 51°C. Overclocked, I reached a maximum of 60°C. Both respectable numbers and most definitely better than a stock Intel heatsink can deliver. Bumping the speeds up to 3.7GHz, I saw temperatures no higher than 71°C. All in all a fair performance. As a pre-filled, permanently sealed system, the ECO is much like the rest of the systems designed by Coolit in that really the only maintenance you will have is cleaning the dust bunnies off the radiator to keep it at peak efficiency. By using a proprietary low toxicity coolant mix with corrosion inhibitors and anti fungal properties the coolant mix should not be an issue.

The one downside I saw with this cooler is much the same thing you find with every other water cooled system on the market, be it a multiple loop custom setup or a pre-built kit. The chipset is cooled by airflow from the heat sink when using an air cooled solution. With a liquid cooled setup you don't have the luxury of airflow over the chipset, so it in turn heats up. With a custom loop you can install a water block on the chipset to solve this problem. You would think installing a a self contained liquid cooling system would be difficult but the reality is that this system is no more difficult to install than any bolt on heat sink on the market. The ECO A.L.C. uses a bolt down retention mechanism with its own back plate to keep the motherboard from flexing. The radiator just bolts right in place of a pre-existing 120mm exhaust fan. Hook up the power to the fan and all in one pump/water block and you are ready to rock and roll. Some water kits are built with only single socket compatibility but not the ECO A.L.C. You get both AMD and all the latest Intel compatibility so if you change your allegiance to a CPU manufacturer, you are not left in the ditch with a $75 cooling system. For the $75 asking price, you get a well put together package from Coolit that delivers cooling performance and increased chassis compatibility. It may not fit the needs of the extreme enthusiast but definitely meets the needs of the masses.

 

Pros:

  • Quiet
  • Higher Chassis compatibility
  • No Maintenance Required
  • Cost comparable to High end Air cooling
  • Ease of Installation
  • Multi socket compatibility
  • All dimm slots open

 

Cons:

  • High Chipset temperature



 

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  1. Introduction & Closer Look
  2. Closer Look: Continued
  3. Specifications & Features
  4. Testing: Setup & Results
  5. Conclusion
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