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Coolink Corator DS Review

ccokeman    -   May 2, 2010
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Conclusion:

The Coolink Corator DS is a heatsink that delivers respectable performance. At stock speeds and voltages, the Corator DS was within two degrees Celsius of the TRUE and Noctua NH-U12P SE 1366 - two high-end coolers in their own right. When compared to the NH-D14 from Noctua, it fell six degrees short. When the CPU is overclocked and over-volted, the gap was five degrees against the NH-U12P, four degrees against the TRUE and then nine degrees against the NH-D14. When you look at performance the Corator DS falls short of the temperatures reached by some of the high-end heatsinks it is compared to.

I think one of the things that really holds this heatsink back is the use of a single fan. The NH-D14 shows off its cooling prowess with the use of a second fan and I have no doubt that the Corator DS would show an improvement with an additional fan. This on the other hand, drives up the the noise and costs. As a larger two-tower design heatsink, I really expected a higher level of cooling performance with the use of GDT (Gapless Direct Touch) technology and use of large 8mm heat-pipes. However, it uses only four of these 8mm copper heat pipes, when the rest of the high-end heatsinks are using six to transfer the thermal load up to the fin array. That, combined with the use of only one fan, is most likely is the reason for the gap in performance.

The performance is good, just not what my expectations were hoping for, based on the size and construction of this cooler. Installing the Corator DS is as easy as mounting Noctua heatsinks, thanks to the use of Noctua's SecuFirm 2 mounting kit. Coolink and Noctua fall under the same corporate umbrella, so why not use a tried and proven mounting system? There is no need to reinvent the wheel, when you have already reached the top rung of the evolutionary ladder.

You can install this heatsink on any current popular socket style, from AM2 upwards for the AMD crowd and Socket 775 upwards for Intel systems. The single SWiF2-120P fan, while a detriment for the cooling, was a boon for the level of noise that the Corator DS made. At no point in the testing did the level of noise reach a level that I could hear above the rest of the background noise in the test environment. The SWiF2-120P fan is a PWM controlled fan that uses a hydrodynamic bearing and moves a maximum of 74CFM at 27 dBA. The Coolink Corator DS is large enough to keep your CPU cool and quiet enough to keep your ears from for begging for mercy. It does a respectable job of keeping CPU temperatures under control with an easy to use mounting system, included thermal paste and a five-year warranty, all for a price that won't break the bank.

 

Pros:

  • Low noise
  • SecuFirm 2 mounting
  • Multi-socket compatibility
  • Performance
  • Gapless Direct Touch technology
  • Size
  • 5 year warranty

 

Cons:

  • Size
  • Single fan
  • Only four heat-pipes



 

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  1. Introduction & Closer Look
  2. Closer Look: Continued
  3. Specifications & Features
  4. Testing: Setup & Results
  5. Conclusion
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