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Cooler Master HAF Stacker Case Review

hornybluecow    -   October 16, 2013
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Cooler Master HAF Stacker 935 Closer Look:

Opening the main chassis was one of the easiest I've come across in the while. The side panels are held in place by two thumb screws. Once unscrewed they hang in place so you cannot misplace them. Afterwards, each panel has a handle that is lightly pulled to detach each one. Once inside you can see six 3.5" hard drive bays with support for SSD mounting via two hard drive cages. Above is three 5.25" bays and while it's a bit strange to only include three bays for a full size tower, my guess is because the hard drive cages are reusable across the Stacker series. The chassis itself supports all the way up to E-ATX motherboards, while the back has a single mount for an SSD drive.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both bays are a repeat from the 915R chassis; each 5.25" uses a locking mechanism for a tool-less design. The lock is spring loaded so all you have to do is, once again, pull it back, put the drive in, line up the screw holes, and it locks into place. The 3.5" bays are the same too, with four pins (two on each side). Simply push the drive into one side and bend the plastic to pop the other two pins into the screw holes.

 

 

Hidden behind the motherboard tray is a SSD mount for those who do not want to waste a 3.5" bay. Installation was a bit strange as one side have hooks that latch on and then you use two screws on the other side. The SSD is never fully secure and rattles a bit.

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The back has a Cooler Master 140mm fan, which is the only form of airflow in this chassis by default. This isn't Cooler Master's best idea as a single fan is not going to cut it. As explained before Cooler Master choose not to include a front fan as it believes it will be instantly replaced.

 

Looking at the front from left to right is the I/O power button, mic jack, headphone jack, one USB 2.0 port, two USB 3.0 ports, and another USB 2.0 port. Once again, no reset button is present due to Cooler Master's customer feedback. If you are curious about the light for the power button, it glows a light red; nothing to write home about, but it does its job. If you are willing to get creative you can always wire the power light to act as a hard drive activity light by changing which connector on the motherboard is used.

 

 

If you are like me and worry about cable management, Cooler Master has you covered. The chassis has a clear of half an inch (13mm), which is enough if you do not plan on overlapping the cables. I was able to push all the cables to the back with just enough room to spare.

 

 

Inside the chassis comes a brown box with all the screws and accessories. Included is: a SATA extension cable, zip ties, and of course lots of screws. Cooler Master went a bit further to include back plates to cover up the unused power supply and motherboard spaces in the 915R. It however did not include a manual at all and the only piece of information is a sheet with a diagram for stacking the chassis. Below that is a QR code and a link to Cooler Master's YouTube channel. This is a huge let down! With so many different configurations, I would expect, no scratch that, demand a manual! Not everyone has Internet on hand or wants to find the correct playlist. If Cooler Master insists on sending customers to the Web, at least send them to the company website with a digital manual.

 

 

Here you have it: completely assembled! As explained before, wire management was a breeze and all the wires managed to reach. I would suggest anyone wanting to use the 915R/F for the power supply to buy cable extensions, especially if the power supply is mounted on the bottom.

 




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