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BFG GeForce GTS 250 OC 1GB Review

ccokeman    -   March 3, 2009
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Conclusion:

So what's in a name? What nVidia hopes to do with the introduction of the GTS 250 is offer a video card to the masses that offers high mid-level performance at a bargain basement price. This is something that the BFG GTS 250 does even though it is based on the G92 GPU. Some may give nVidia grief about another rename of an aging card but it is still a viable option and the rename is meant to reduce that confusion at the retail level. With the 9800GTX+ currently selling anywhere from $125 to $175, the GTS 250 is right in line price-wise and falls below many of the cards currently offered for sale. With two flavors to choose from, differentiated from each other by the size of the frame buffer at 512MB and 1GB, they are priced accordingly at $129 and $149. Performance wise, the BFG GTS 250 outperformed the overclocked HD4850 in the majority of our benchmarks. That being said, you have a card that performs well in resolutions up to 1920x1200 and still is playable up to 2560x1600 in some of the games. This for a price below that of the competition. What sets the GTS 250 apart from the others is that you have the technologies to back up the card so it is not just a one trick pony. You have CUDA that allows you to use the GPU to do things such as transcode video, run distributed computing projects such as Folding @ Home if you want to help in the search for a cure and Seti @ Home if you just want to find some aliens. You have PhysX processing that gives a more realistic gaming experience by having the environment react to inputs such as wind and bullets. Unfortunately, enabling PhysX has a detrimental effect on FPS in game when run on a single card, but this card would be the answer to that problem. You could use the GTS 250 as your PhysX processing card and let your GTX series card do all of the real work, thereby increasing your frames per second in PhysX enabled games such as Mirror's Edge. With three big name manufacturers signed on to develop PhysX enabled games, the technology can only improve. Couple that with a set of 3DVision goggles and you have an amazing experience.

If you own a 9800GTX+ and want to run SLI, you could pick up a GTS 250 for less coin than the same card you have. But aren't they two different cards and therefore aren't compatible in SLI? Well, yes they are Johnny. You see, the GTS 250 is basically the 9800GTX+ in a smaller, more energy efficient package that does not make as much noise as the other cards in its class. Even as a renamed card with a few updates, this old dog has still got it. The GTS 250 will fill a price point and hopefully eliminate some of the confusion at the big box stores and e-tailers. Backed up by multiple technologies and a never ending series of driver improvements, the GTS series of cards will provide a rich experience for those that have champagne tastes with a Black Label budget. Look for these to hit stores around the 10th of March. How could you go wrong!?

 

Pros:

  • Overclocking
  • Cool running
  • Budget performance
  • Tri SLI capable
  • Compatable with the 9800GTX+ in SLI
  • PhysX technology
  • CUDA technology
  • Price

 

Cons:

  • Old tech

 

OCC Silver



  1. Introduction & Closer Look
  2. Closer Look (The Card)
  3. Closer Look: Drivers & Programs
  4. Specifications & Features
  5. Testing (Setup & Overclocking)
  6. Testing: Far Cry 2
  7. Testing: Crysis-Warhead
  8. Testing: BioShock
  9. Testing: Call Of Duty World at War
  10. Testing: Dead Space
  11. Testing: Fallout 3
  12. Testing: Left 4 Dead
  13. Testing: 3DMark 06 Professional
  14. Testing: 3DMark Vantage
  15. Conclusion
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