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ASUS P7P55D Premium and P7P55D-E Pro Review

ccokeman    -   January 28, 2010
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Testing:

Testing is the only way to prove whether or not one motherboard is better than the others when it comes down to performance. Some groups like all the whiz-bang features, while the hardcore enthusiasts just want good solid reliable performance. To find out which one gives that last little bit of clock speed, or has the right options in the BIOS, means you have to test the motherboards out one at a time. Quite an arduous task when you get down to it, but it's the only way. To test out this pair of P55 based boards from ASUS, I will be running them through the OverclockersClub suite of benchmarks, to see if it distinguishes itself from the comparison boards. The only deviations from the default BIOS settings will be that the energy saving features as well as Turbo technology are disabled so that the motherboard can be tested with a measure of repeatability. The video card control panel settings are left at factory defaults except where noted. Since each motherboard company has its own design philosophy it will be interesting to see which of the designs wins out.

 

Testing Setup:

 

Comparison Motherboards:

 

Overclocking:

Overclocked settings:

  • P7P55D Premium  Core i7 870 213x20 4252 MHz
  • P7P55D-E Pro    Core i7 870 210x19 4002 MHz

What you get with this pair of boards from ASUS is a suite of software utilities that allows the novice to reach into the ranks of the enthusiast and pull out a respectable overclock with not much work or understanding of how to get there. Both of the boards delivered respectable overclocks when setting the parameters manually or using the TurboV software. When I used the software, the overclocks on the P7P55D Premium reached right around 3.8 GHz while the P7P55D-E Pro reached a bit higher and set the clock speed at just over 4 GHz When using the Extreme OC function. Unfortunately, I had to do some manipulation of the vcore to get them Prime95 stable at those speeds. After the voltage tweaking, the clocks were stable. The only thing I do not like with the Extreme OC tuning is that it is time consuming. The fast tuning feature on the other hand worked on the first try and gave me a stable 3.8GHz overclock that was stable for a couple of hours at least. This seems to be an improvement in the software to combat the MSI One Touch OC concept. It worked! To manually tune the board, there is no real difference from tuning motherboards as you have the same basic options available to you. By using a combination of bclock, clock multiplier, DRAM multiplier and voltages I was able to reach a clock speed of 4252Mhz with a combination of a bclock of 213 and a multiplier of 21. The Pro on the other hand would give up a 210 bclock but only when using the 19 multiplier for a final speed of 4002Mhz. The vcore, vtt and memory voltages were adjusted to reach these goals.

 

 

Benchmarks:

  • Scientific & Data:
  1. Apophysis
  2. WinRAR
  3. Office 2007 Excel Number Crunch
  4. POV Ray 3.7
  5. PCMark Vantage Professional
  6. Sandra XII
  7. ScienceMark 2.02
  8. Cinebench 10
  9. HD Tune 2.55
  • Video:
  1. Far Cry 2
  2. Crysis Warhead
  3. BioShock
  4. Call of Duty World At War
  5. Dead Space 
  6. Warhammer 40,000 Dawn of War II
  7. Left 4 Dead
  8. 3DMark 06 Professional
  9. 3DMark Vantage



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