Welcome Stranger to OCC!Login | Register

Asus P6T Review

ccokeman    -   March 10, 2009
» Discuss this article (3)

Lowest Prices

Testing:

To see just what kind of performance the Asus P6T is capable of I will take it through the OverclockersClub benchmarking suite. It includes synthetic and gaming benchmarks to show how it performs. I will compare the performance of the P6T against previously tested motherboards based on the same chipset. All of the stock testing is run with the factory default settings in the BIOS, save for manually setting the memory clock speeds, voltage and processor voltage. Turbo mode has been disabled on the X58 boards to eliminate any variables due to changing clock speeds during single and multi threaded benchmarks. SMT was enabled during testing as well. To overclock the Asus P6T I will push the limits and try to show results that should be easily duplicated based on the capabilities of your CPU and system memory.

 

Testing Setup i7:

 

Comparison Motherboards:

 

Overclocking:

Overclocked settings:

  • Processor: Intel Core i7 920 215x19 1.38 volts
  • System Memory: Mushkin 3x 2GB 9-9-8-24 1700 MHz 1.62 volts

The P6T is the lesser featured brother of the P6T Deluxe OC and as such the expectations for how well it will overclock were not really as high as the higher end boards. With the reduction from a 16+2 power design to the 8+2 design on the P6T it did not look good . As it turns out, that thought could not have been further from the truth. What I found was that the P6T has got some game. The 920 that I am using is a retail version and not the ES that I looked at back in November and really was an untested commodity. After checking the stepping against a few overclocking databases it looked like it may well be an average chip. Average chip, lower end board, things did not look good. But both the 920 and P6T put on a little show and came up big. The maximum baseclock I could achieve with stability was 222MHz. But this was pretty much bench stable. 220 was stable enough to be prime stable at 220x18, or 3.96 GHz, pretty sweet so far. To get there I needed just 1.38 volts on the CPU, a QPI voltage of 1.39v, IOH of 1.36v, CPU PLL voltage of 1.86 with the memory at 1.62 volts. Not a whole heck of a lot to do to bust out that kind of speed. But of course, 3.9 is not enough and I wanted to see if the little 920 was indeed a bona fide 4GHz chip without big volts. To push higher, I dropped the base clock down to 215MHz from 220MHz with a multiplier of 19 to get to 4.1GHz. I was expecting a fight to get there and was surprised at the fact that all it took to get this clock speed stable was an increase in the CPU voltage to 1.395volts with no other changes to the previous voltage settings. Now the one thing I found that you have to do though is keep air flowing over the X58 chip to keep it cool to maintain stability at the high baseclock levels I was playing at. Other than that, nothing really special was needed to push the clock speeds on the P6T. I have got to say that the board delivered the overclocking goods with an untested CPU.

 

 

Benchmarks:

  • Scientific & Data:
  1. Apophysis
  2. WinRAR
  3. SpecviewPerf 10
  4. PCMark Vantage Professional
  5. Sandra XII
  6. ScienceMark 2.02
  7. Cinebench 10
  8. HD Tune 2.55
  • Video:
  1. Far Cry 2
  2. Crysis Warhead
  3. BioShock
  4. Call of Duty World At War
  5. Dead Space
  6. Fallout 3
  7. Left 4 Dead
  8. 3DMark 06 Professional
  9. 3DMark Vantage

 




Random Pic
© 2001-2014 Overclockers Club ® Privacy Policy

Also part of our network: TalkAndroid, Android Forum, iPhone Informer, Neoseeker, and Used Audio Classifieds

Elapsed: 0.0274498463