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Asus P6T Review

ccokeman    -   March 10, 2009
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Conclusion:

The Asus P6T proved to be an excellent overclocker with the ability to push the base clock to 222MHz for some Super Pi runs while running prime stable at 220MHz but with a reduced multiplier. The baseclock frequency reached is a function of how good both the processor and motherboard are. I was surprised at how easily the Asus P6T was able to scale upward as well. Pushing the processor past 4.0 GHz proved to be no problem with the P6T. The only real problem I had was that the cooling on the chipset was a little suspect and was extremely hot to the touch when pushing the clock speeds on the processor and memory. A quick fix is to have a fan blowing cool air over the heatsink to reduce the operating temperatures. Once that was done, I had no stability problems when pushing the limits on this board. If you don't need the additional cooling and toys, the P6T would be a great choice. The price of admission into this world of performance is right around $250, which is on the low end of the scale. While the bundle is not as expansive as some boards I have looked at, there is everything to get you started on your build. The Tri SLI bridge is included as well as the Crossfire bridge connector and not too much more. The P6T Deluxe OC, for example, runs nearly $100 more for a better bundle of accessories, better cooling and better power regulation. The fact that you can get top tier performance and overclocking from one of the lowest priced X58 based boards out there means Asus did its homework. The 8+2 phase power design works with the Core I7 920 I used in this evaluation, as evidenced by the 4.1GHz clock speed. Voltages appeared to stay steady during the overclocking phase and did not seem to cause any instability. When it comes to recovering from a failed overclock, the P6T has no issues. Reboot and go back and modify your settings, they are the same as you left them. This saves time by allowing you to only have to remember just what the last change was versus having to clear the CMOS and start from scratch. Not once did I have to employ that tool. One of the best features for those running without a case or are too lazy to hook up the front panel connections are the onboard switches for Power and Reset. No more jumping pins to get the system startred. This is not a new feature but one that has made its way onto more and more boards over the past couple of years. It's almost a requirement for enthusiast grade components.

The layout of the board is functional, with the only exception being the CMOS battery. It ends up under the video card in the top PCI-E slot. For video options there is, of course, the single card option or you can use multi GPU options from both ATI and nVidia as they are both supported with the X58 chipset. CrossfireX and Tri SLI are supported, but with no mention of Quad SLI on this board. The Asus P6T performed flawlessly once I found the ideal combination of settings to make the most of my combination. The Asus P6T delivers top tier performance with low end pricing. There is no reason not to include this board on your short list when looking for a new motherboard for that Intel Core I7 system you are just itching to build. Price, performance, multi GPU capability, how could you go wrong?

 

Pros:

  • Overclocking
  • Performance
  • Price
  • Stability
  • Bundle
  • Onboard Power and Reset buttons
  • BIOS
  • Tri SLI and CrossfireX Capable
  • Energy savings

 

Cons:

  • Chipset cooling
  • Poor CMOS battery placement

 

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