Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W Power Supply Review - Revisited

paulktreg - 2009-09-01 14:43:30 in Power Supplies
Category: Power Supplies
Reviewed by: paulktreg   
Reviewed on: October 20, 2009
Antec
Price: $184.99

Introduction:

"Put the pedal to the metal, feel the rush, the power and unrivalled performance of the high wattage power supply you know you want. Allieviate any guilt you may have, knowing the Antec's TruePower Quattro is 80 Plus certified. Designed specifically for the most demanding computer specifications, this power supply features four 12V output circuits ensuring unbeatable system stability. Combined with ±3% load regulation to protect your computers components, gold plated connectors for superior conductivity, modular and sleeved cable connectors and 80 Plus certified, TruePower Quattro delivers when the race is on. Don't be last across the finish line. Unquestionably stable power through high efficient technology for tomorrows ultimate PC."

The Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W power supply has already been reviewed by OCC back in March 2008. Antec has kindly let OCC have another unit for review, which tells me it will probably remain current for a while. This time around, I will be putting it through its paces, following the OCC testing methodology and giving it a little more to think about. It scored an OCC Gold award the first time around, so let's see how it performs and what award, if any, it merits when supplying its full power rating of 1000W.

Closer Look:

The Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W power supply comes in a mainly matte white box with black end panels, with color only used sparingly for photographs and logos. The lid clearly shows the 1000W rating of the power supply, which is used as a window through which a photograph of the power supply can be seen. Dual graphics ready, 80 Plus and Quiet Computing logos, along with a short sentence telling us the power supply is a high performance modular power supply, complete the picture. The base of the box carries a list of main features with the 80 Plus Certified logo and a brief explanation of what 80 Plus is all about, in English, French and German. Color photographs of the available connectors along with quantities run along the bottom of the base.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black end panels are used to good effect displaying small color logos to illustrate some of the main features, which include universal 100-240VAC input, 6/8-pin PCI-E connectors, four 12V rails, and active power factor correction. The opposite end panel bares a short paragraph, used in the introduction, again in three languages, along with two photographs showing the power supply without and with the modular cables installed to illustrate cable management.

 

 

The front panel contains an Antec logo, power supply dimensions in imperial and metric, and a small color photograph of the power supply. The back panel gives some of the technical detail, including specification table, warehouse and storage instructions, and the AQ5 warranty logo.

 

Lift the lid and the user manual is the first thing you see along with power supply protective foam envelope, captive cables with power cord on one side and all the modular cables contained in a plastic bag on the other side. Remove the top foam protective lid and the Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W is revealed with its white racing stripes and racing number, keeping with the racing car theme mentioned in the introduction.

 

 

 

Below is a photograph of the power supply enclosed in the plastic bag, showing the captive cable/connectors, and a photograph showing the accessories, user manual, mounting screws, modular cable bag, and power cord. Congratulations to Antec for being one of the few manufacturers to send me the UK version with the correct power cord.

 

 

The packaging is fairly simple and not too flashy. Perhaps Antec feels it doesn't need to be, letting the power supply do all the talking – we will see. The accessories set is basic, but adequate – a few cable ties, however, would have been a welcome addition.

 

Closer Look (The Power Supply):

The Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W with its satin black finish and white racing stripes does its best to mimic a racing car, and we are left with little doubt that it's rated at 1000W. The design is novel, but performance is king, and let's face it, once installed in the majority of PC enclosures, all will be hidden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W, unlike most other power supplies in this class, is cooled by a single rear mounted 80mm fan. To cool the power supply efficiently and match the more popular 135-140mm cooling fans usually employed, I suspect the fan speed on the ATQ 1000W is going to have to be ramped up at high power draws, leading to high noise levels, but we will see. IEC mains input and an on/off switch join the fan on the back panel, which means the usual solid front panel of the power supply sports the cooling inlet grill and modular cable connectors along one edge. The cables leaving the power supply are not braided all the way into the power supply, which looks a little untidy. The white stripes are neatly continued across the inlet grill.

 

 

The side panels, one with an extra air inlet and the other carrying a comprehensive specification label.

 

 

The top and bottom panels both with the white stripes and 1000 logo. There is another air inlet on one of the faces, which is quite close to the one shown above on the side panel. There is likely a component in this area that requires a little extra cooling.

 

 

The captive cable/connector set on the left and the full set of modular cables on the right. You'll probably notice the use of plastic collars to hold the black cable braiding in place rather than the more usual and less secure heat shrink sleeving.

 

 

The power supply lid that would, in the majority of power supplies, provide a mounting point for a large 140mm cooling fan.

 

The tightly veined heatsink construction increases its surface area and cooling ability dramatically, which may go some way to explaining the use of a smaller 80mm cooling fan. The cooling fan is manufactured by Adda and carries the model number AD0812UB-A70GL, rated at 12VDC 0.30A.

 

The printed circuit board appears very well built, with component and heatsink orientation designed to follow the airflow and maximize cooling. No manufacturer's marks are visible on the printed circuit board, so I don't know whether this board is made for or by Antec. The electrolytic capacitors are all rated at 105°C and, from what I was able to see, made by Nippon Chemicon and Teapo – both reputable manufacturers.

 

 

There is certainly a lot packed into this power supply, which can result in cooling problems. However, with very large heatsinks with a large surface area taking up all the available spare space, cooling should not prove a problem with the Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W. At least if the efficiency is, as stated, at 80 Plus levels. The overall quality of the build looks to be very high and everything is well laid out and tidy.

 

Specifications:

Ratings Table:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W Specifications (Part No: TPQ-1000 GB)
AC Input
100-240VAC   15-9A 50-60Hz
DC Output
+5V
+3V3
+12V1
+12V2
+12V3
+12V4
-12V
+5VSB
Maximum Load
30A
25A
25A
25A
25A
25A
0.5A
3A
Maximum
Combined
Wattage
200W
840W(70A)
6W
15W
1000W

 

System Protection:

 

No specific figures are given for any of the system protection features. The following paragraph is, however, included in the user manual.

"It also includes a variety of industrial grade protective circuitry: OCP (Over Current Protection), OVP (Over Voltage Protection), SCP (Short Circuit Protection), and UVP (Under Voltage Protection)."

 

Safety & Agency Approvals:

 

UL, CUL, CE, CB, FCC Class B, TUV, CCC and C Tick.

 

Power Supply Weight:

 

Power Supply Weight
Manufacturer/Model
Weight
Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
2.8kg
6.2lbs

 

Power Supply Connectors:

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W Connectors
20+4-Pin Motherboard
Captive
1
EPS12V 8-Pin
Captive
1
ATX12V 4-Pin
Captive
1
PCI-E 6+2-Pin
Captive
2
PCI-E 6-Pin
Modular
2
SATA Power
Modular
8
Peripheral 4-Pin
Modular
9
FDD
Modular
2

 

Power Supply Cable Lengths:

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W Cable Lengths
Captive
PSU > 21" > 20+4-Pin Motherboard
1
Captive
PSU > 21" > 8-Pin EPS12V
1
Captive
PSU > 21" > 4-Pin ATX12V
1
Captive
PSU > 21" > PCI-E 6+2-Pin
2
Modular
PSU > 21" > PCI-E 6-Pin
2
Modular
PSU > 21" > SATA > 6" > SATA
1
Modular
PSU > 21" > SATA > 6" > SATA > 6" > SATA
2
Modular
PSU > 21" > Peripheral > 6" > Peripheral > 6" > Peripheral > 6" > FDD
2
Modular
PSU > 21" > Peripheral > 6" > Peripheral > 6" > Peripheral
1

 

Features:

Exactly as printed on the box.

 

Testing:

For more information on how we test our power supplies, please browse our testing methodology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Electrical Safety:

 

Electrical Safety Test Class 1
Manufacturer/Model
Pass/Fail
Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
Pass

 

Short Circuit Protection:

I short circuited the 3V3, 5V0 and all four 12V lines in turn. The power supply did shut down, and once the short was removed and the unit switched off for at least one second, resumed normal operation. Although listed here at the beginning of the testing section, I tend to leave this test until the very end, in case it doesn't quite go to plan.

 

DC Output Voltage Load Regulation:

 

Mains Input Voltage 110VAC

 

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
DC Output Voltage Load Regulation
AC Supply = 110V / DC Load = 0W
PSU DC Rail
Measured Voltage(V)
3V3
3.37
5V0
5.12
+12V1
12.17
+12V2
12.17
+12V3
12.17
+12V4
12.17
-12V
-11.50
5VSB
5.13

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
DC Output Voltage Load Regulation
110VAC- Total Load at 197W which is 20% of Rated Maximum Output Power
PSU
DC Rail
Measured
Voltage(V)
Measured
Current (A)
Load Power
(W)
ATX12V V Limits
(V)
Pass/Fail
+3V3
3.36
3.14
10.55
3.135 – 3.465
Pass
+5V
5.12
9.36
47.92
4.75 – 5.25
Pass
+12V1
12.17
2.55
31.03
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V2
12.18
2.57
31.30
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V3
12.17
2.54
30.91
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V4
12.17
2.57
31.28
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
-12V
11.14
0.33
3.68
10.8 – 13.2
Pass
+5VSB
5.05
2.11
10.66
4.75 – 5.25
Pass
Total Power Supply Loading
197W
 

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
DC Output Voltage Load Regulation
110VAC- Total Load at 525W which is 52.5% of Rated Maximum Output Power
PSU
DC Rail
Measured
Voltage(V)
Measured
Current (A)
Load Power
(W)
ATX12V V Limits
(V)
Pass/Fail
+3V3
3.37
8.01
26.99
3.135 – 3.465
Pass
+5V
5.13
9.51
48.79
4.75 – 5.25
Pass
+12V1
12.18
8.11
98.78
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V2
12.18
8.04
97.92
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V3
12.16
8.07
98.13
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V4
12.15
11.53
140.09
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
-12V
11.38
0.34
3.87
10.8 – 13.2
Pass
+5VSB
5.05
2.11
10.65
4.75 – 5.25
Pass
Total Power Supply Loading
525W
 

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
DC Output Voltage Load Regulation
110VAC - Total Load at 972W which is 97% of Rated Maximum Output Power
PSU
DC Rail
Measured
Voltage(V)
Measured
Current (A)
Load Power
(W)
ATX12V V Limits
(V)
Pass/Fail
+3V3
3.37
16.38
55.20
3.135 – 3.465
Pass
+5V
5.15
19.09
98.31
4.75 – 5.25
Pass
+12V1
11.98
13.38
160.29
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V2
12.02
13.64
163.95
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V3
11.97
20.65
247.18
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V4
12.02
20.58
247.37
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
-12V
11.61
0.35
4.06
10.8 – 13.2
Pass
+5VSB
5.05
2.11
10.65
4.75 – 5.25
Pass
Total Power Supply Loading
972W
 

 

Mains Input Voltage 230VAC

 

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
DC Output Voltage Load Regulation
AC Supply = 230V / DC Load = 0W
PSU DC Rail
Measured Voltage(V)
3V3
3.37
5V0
5.12
+12V1
12.18
+12V2
12.17
+12V3
12.17
+12V4
12.17
-12V
-11.53
5VSB
5.13

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
DC Output Voltage Load Regulation
230VAC- Total Load at 198W which is 20% of Rated Maximum Output Power
PSU
DC Rail
Measured
Voltage(V)
Measured
Current (A)
Load Power
(W)
ATX12V V Limits
(V)
Pass/Fail
+3V3
3.37
3.13
10.55
3.135 – 3.465
Pass
+5V
5.12
9.52
48.74
4.75 – 5.25
Pass
+12V1
12.17
2.57
31.28
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V2
12.17
2.55
31.03
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V3
12.17
2.54
30.91
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V4
12.17
2.59
31.52
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
-12V
11.14
0.33
3.68
10.8 – 13.2
Pass
+5VSB
5.05
2.11
10.65
4.75 – 5.25
Pass
Total Power Supply Loading
198W
 

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
DC Output Voltage Load Regulation
230VAC - Total Load at 524W which is 52% of Rated Maximum Output Power
PSU
DC Rail
Measured
Voltage(V)
Measured
Current (A)
Load Power
(W)
ATX12V V Limits
(V)
Pass/Fail
+3V3
3.36
7.88
26.48
3.135 – 3.465
Pass
+5V
5.13
9.36
48.01
4.75 – 5.25
Pass
+12V1
12.18
8.10
98.66
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V2
12.18
8.12
98.90
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V3
12.16
8.06
98.00
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V4
12.15
11.51
139.85
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
-12V
11.38
0.34
3.87
10.8 – 13.2
Pass
+5VSB
5.05
2.11
10.65
4.75 – 5.25
Pass
Total Power Supply Loading
524W
 

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
DC Output Voltage Load Regulation
230VAC - Total Load at 975W which is 97% of Rated Maximum Output Power
PSU
DC Rail
Measured
Voltage(V)
Measured
Current (A)
Load Power
(W)
ATX12V V Limits
(V)
Pass/Fail
+3V3
3.37
16.55
55.77
3.135 – 3.465
Pass
+5V
5.14
19.17
98.53
4.75 – 5.25
Pass
+12V1
12.06
13.38
161.36
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V2
12.06
13.34
160.88
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V3
12.02
20.03
240.76
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
+12V4
12.05
20.20
243.41
11.4 – 12.6
Pass
-12V
11.65
0.35
4.08
10.8 – 13.2
Pass
+5VSB
5.05
2.11
10.65
4.75 – 5.25
Pass
Total Power Supply Loading
975W
 

 

DC output load regulation is on the whole quite good although the -12V rail is a little lower than I would like to see, especially at low loading, but still within the limits set down by the ATX12V V2.2 specification.

 

Testing (Continued):

Efficiency and Power Factor:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
Output & Efficiency @ 110VAC
DC Load (W)
AC Load (W)
PF
Efficiency (%)
Pass/Fail
0
33
0.93
N/A
N/A
197
250
0.99
79
Pass
525
630
1.00
83
Pass
972
1225
1.00
79
Pass

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
Output & Efficiency @ 230VAC
DC Load (W)
AC Load (W)
PF
Efficiency (%)
Pass/Fail
0
34
0.46
N/A
N/A
198
245
0.96
81
Pass
524
598
0.98
88
Pass
975
1171
0.98
83
Pass

 

Power factor levels are very good and compare well with other power supplies in this class with levels maintained at well above 0.9, even on 230VAC which is unusual – 110VAC is never usually a problem when active power factor correction is implemented. The packaging of the Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W indicates 80 Plus standard certification and the 80 Plus Organization website gives it  80 Plus Bronze certification – which one is correct? Bronze certification requires efficiencies of 82% at 20% load, 85% at 50% load and 82% at 100% load. The Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W falls well short of this following the OCC testing methodology. Standard 80 Plus certification on the other hand requires 80% efficiency across the same load levels and giving the power supply the benefit of the doubt and some leeway with measurement accuracies, 79%, 83% and 79% isn't too far of the mark. Taking the ATX12V V2.2 specification as the standard benchmark, the Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W easily merits a pass in this section.

 

AC Ripple On DC Outputs:

 

I have consistently found the AC ripple levels on the DC rails to be more or less equal with a 110VAC or 230VAC mains supply. The results given below are for 230VAC only, but I will continue to check the levels at 110VAC during testing and publish them below if they differ in any way.

 

AC Ripple On 3V3 Rail at 230VAC

Oscilloscope settings: Amplitude = 20mv/div, Timebase = 10uS/div

 

AC Ripple On 5V0 Rail at 230VAC

Oscilloscope settings: Amplitude = 20mv/div, Timebase = 10uS/div

 

AC Ripple On 12V1 Rail at 230VAC

Oscilloscope settings: Amplitude = 20mv/div, Timebase = 10uS/div

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
AC Ripple/Noise
DC Rail
+3V3
+5V0
+12V
-12V0
+5VSB
Ripple (mV p-p)
50
50
100
100
40
Pass/Fail
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass
Pass

 

The AC ripple/noise levels on the rails of the Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W aren't as good as some other power supplies in this class, with levels at or very near to the maximum levels permitted by the ATX12V V2.2 specification, but a pass nonetheless.

 

Testing (Continued):

Temperature, Noise Levels and Fan Speeds:

 

I am not going to give a pass or fail in this section, as the ATX12V V2.2 does not really have any references on which to base a decision.

Temperatures are purely for information only, as there are too many variables involved when installed in a case, which, by the way, it wasn't. Ambient temperature, processor cooling efficiency and case cooling fans all play their part on the temperature of the air entering the power supply, and consequently the temperature of the air leaving it. No valid conclusions can be made from this test.

 

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W
Temperature & Fan Speeds @ 110/230VAC
DC Loading(W)
Temp In (°C)
Temp Out (°C)
Δ Temp (°C)
Fan Speed (RPM)
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
1793/1767
197/198
21.0/21.3
24.8/23.3
3.8/2.0
1790/1779
525/524
20.6/21.0
27.8/26.2
7.2/5.2
1806/1847
972/975
21.2/21.3
37.6/31.2
16.4/9.9
2901/2736

 

The temperatures of  the Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W were lower than I expected with an 80mm cooling fan, but the downside to this is rotational speeds approaching twice that of the more commonly used 135-140mm fans . The fan noise was quite noticeable at 2901RPM, but the power supply was loaded at a near maximum level of 975W – a level most users just won't reach, but more on that later.

 

Conclusion:

Environmental Factors:

Foam inserts are once again used to protect the power supply. The Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W does however maintain power factor levels well above 0.9, and in combination with a maximum efficiency of 88%, it pulls a few green points back. No silly bag for the modular cables either!

 

Price Per Watt:

Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W at $184.99 = $0.18/Watt (10-2009)

 

The Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W performed very well during testing, but I have a couple of issues with its construction I would just like to point out. DC voltage load regulation was excellent, efficiency just about reaching the levels required by 80 Plus certification and noise/ripple, although a little on the high side, was still within the ATX12V V2.2 specification. What did concern me is a lack of modular cables and the way they are configured. I noticed during testing that two of the pins on the sockets for the two 6-pin PCI-E modular cables are connected to the 3V3 and 5V0 rails, making them unavailable for PCI-E use.

 

The photograph above shows the 6-pin PCI-E modular cable power supply connector. The two unused pins carry a 3V3 and 5V0 rail connection on the power supply socket, making them unusable for PCI-E 12V power, which resulted in two wires being crimped into one socket to give the necessary three yellow and three black wires at the graphics card end. Could it cause overload problems at these points on the more power hungry graphic cards, probably not, but I thought it worth pointing out.

The Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W lacks modular cable connections in my opinion. It will easily power two high end graphics cards in SLI or Crossfire, but that's as far you go with the four available PCI-E connectors (two 6+2-pin and two 6-pin). Power consumption of a high end dual graphic card computer would be 600-700W maximum, which leaves 300-400W of unusable power. That's fine for the user who likes a little headroom, but it does prevent the use of this power supply with three high end graphics cards – rare I know, but they are out there, and the Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W could power such a configuration with more connectors.

All in all, the Antec Truepower Quattro 1000W is a very capable power supply that will easily power any dual graphics card configuration. The paint job may not be to everyone's taste, but I can see the appeal it may hold for some, especially the car enthuiast. Ripple levels on the rails are a little higher than most other power supplies in this class, but are still within the boundaries set by the ATX12V V2.2 specification and won't prove to be a problem. Fan noise, especially at high loads, could be unacceptable for some users, but it is to be expected with the use of a small 80mm cooling fan hitting nearly 3000 rpm.

 

Pros:

 

Cons: