Antec Truepower Quattro TPQ-1000 Review

ccokeman - 2008-03-11 22:31:38 in Power Supplies
Category: Power Supplies
Reviewed by: ccokeman   
Reviewed on: March 25, 2008
Price: $187.99

Introduction:

Electricity, current, power, electric, all common names for the thing that makes the wonderful toys we play with come to life. Now, what happens when there is not enough or too much of it? Usually things don't work right. In the case of our beloved computers, too little power results in crashes, lockups and shutdowns that are hard to trace. Too much usually ends up causing component failures that you only notice when the smoke starts billowing out the rear of the case. Neither of these scenarios are ideal for the longevity of that high dollar luxury item that sits on the desk. When building a computer, picking a power supply is usually an after thought. As the last thing picked for the build, most of the dollars alloted for build are gone. So, we just spend what is left to get a power supply that will "be just fine" for the build. Making the right choice on which power supply to use is never easy. Sure there are some online calculators that give a worst case estimate, but it's better to be safe rather than sorry. Understanding the consequences of making the wrong choice is half the battle. The other half comes in when making the choice of which power supply is right for the build. How many watts, efficiency rating, modular or not, quad core or dual core processor, single or multi GPU for the graphics,water cooling or air cooling are some questions that need to be asked to make the correct choice.

The Antec TruePower Quattro TPQ-1000 watt power supply is one that should power up and run some of the most demanding systems out today. As the name implies, it features four separate 12 volt rails or lines, is a semi-modular design, is 80 plus certified, over current protection, over voltage protection, under voltage protection, short circuit protection, and active PFC, all in a package that delivers 1000 watts of power for use by the system. With ever increasing processor counts, Tri and Quad SLI, as well as CrossfireX now realities, the need for power just keeps scaling upwards. Will the Antec TruePower Quattro 1000 watt power supply deliver what we need?

Closer Look:

The Antec Quattro 1000 comes in a plain white box with just the companies name and a 1000 on the front just to let you know what size unit this is. The rear panel list the connections that the power supply comes with as well as the some of the specifications. The term 80+ is defined on the rear panel.

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Opening the package you can see that Antec has packaged the power supply in a foam enclosure with the modular and main power cables stored around the block. The documentation for the Quattro 1000 is left on top for easy access to the literature.

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Closer Look:

Pulled out of the package the Truepower Quattro 1000 is a semi modular design. The main 24-pin ATX connection, 8-pin auxiliary 12v, 4-pin auxiliary 12v. and two 6+2 pin PCI-e power connectioons are hard mounted to the chassis. The modular connections are just under the hard mounted wiring. There are five connections here, three for all of the peripherals on one rail, and one rail for each PCI-e connection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the left side of the Quattro are the specifications. The right side and front face include ventilation slots to allow airflow through the power supply enclosure. One special note is that there is only one 80mm fan to remove the heat generated by the power supply. As an 80 plus design, the Antec Quattro puts out less heat, so therefore needs less airflow to remove the heat, resulting in a reduction of the noise generated by the Quattro.

 

 

 

The modular cables that come with the Quattro should cover just about everyone. Three cables feature 4-pin molex and floppy connections, three cables are dedicated to SATA connectivity, and there are two dedicated PCI-e graphics connections. The main power cord is not the usual 16 gauge power supply cord. Antec has chosen to supply a 14 gauge cord instead. The larger the wire, the less voltage droop enters the power supply.

 

 

 

One thing you should never do is to open up your power supply. Several concerns are raised; first and foremost is safety, and second is the warranty of the power supply. Just so you don't have to open this power supply up to determine the components, I will open her up. Upon first inspection space is at a premium in this 1000 watt power supply. The majority of the room is taken up by several large heatsinks. The modular connections are soldered on to a small PCB at the front of the power supply.

 

 

The view of the primary side of the power supply is dominated by the capacitor and coil. The capacitor has a rating of 450 volts 560µF and 105 Celsius. The secondary side uses Teapo capacitors and contains all of the power distribution points.

 

 

The fan that cools the Antec Truepower Quattro is manufactured by ADDA. This dual ball bearing fan is thermally controlled by the internal component temperature of the power supply. It is rated at 3400 RPM, .30A, 43.8CFM at 40dba. The fan spools up when the load is pushed, but was not annoying in the least.

 

Specifications:

 

Safety Protection
Over Voltage Protection (OVP)
Short Circuit Protection (SCP)
Under Voltage Protection UVP)
Over Current Protection (OCP)
Input:
Input Voltage
100~240VAC ± 10%
Input frequency Range
47Hz ~ 63Hz
Efficiency
Up to 85%
Environmental:
Operating Temperature
0°C to 50°C
Net Weight
5.75 lbs
Safety Approvals
UL, CUL, FCC, TÜV, CE, C-tick, CCC, CB
Size
3.4” (H) x 5.9” (W) x 7.1” (D)
UCC13#
850 Watt
1000 Watt
0761345-07850-4
0761345-07990-7
0761345-07851-1
0761345-07991-4

 

OutputVoltage
Load Range
               
Reg.
Ripple
Noise
Min
Max
+5V
0.2A
30.0A
±3ï¼…
50
50
+12V1
0.1A
18.0A
±3ï¼…
120
120
+12V2
0.5A
18.0A
±3ï¼…
120
120
+12V3
0 A
18.0A
±3ï¼…
120
120
+12V4
0 A
18.0A
±3ï¼…
120
120
-12V
0 A
0.5A
±5ï¼…
120
120
+5VSB
0 A
3.0A
±5ï¼…
50
50
+3.3V
0.1A
25.0A
±3ï¼…`
50
50
 
Total Power: 1000W continuous output @ 50C
+5V and +3.3V combined max. output: 200W
+12V outputs combined max. output: 840W(70A)
 

Features:

 All information provided here sourced from the manufacturers product page at http://www.antec.com/us/productDetails.php?ProdID=27100

Testing:

How will I know if this power supply delivers the watts? I need to test how it performs under load, verifying the voltages and airflow. With that being said, we can finally start testing the unit. To put this power supply through its paces, I will run a series of tests to load the Antec Truepower Quattro to simulate heavy gaming usage . The testing procedure will include running Stressprime 2004 Orthos Edition to stress the CPU and memory, HDtune to load the hard drives, and 3DMark06 Professional to stress both video cards. The test system includes five high CFM Silverstone fans to add additional load to the 12 volt lines. Additionally, I will check the airflow at both idle and load conditions to verify any increase in airflow through the rear of the power supply. Voltage measurements will be taken with my trusty voltmeter, while airflow will be tested using my Kestral 4100 pocket airflow tracker.

 

Testing Tools:

Testing Setup:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Testing the system under load I anticipated seeing some voltage fluctuation, especially when hitting the 12 volt line pretty hard. I was pleasantly surprised to see the voltage actually move very little. From the beginning of the testing to the end, I saw a fluctuation of .01 volt on the 12 volt line (average of all four rails) as well as .03 on the 5 volt and .02 volts on the 3.3 line. With the starting and stopping of the tests in 3Dmark06 I expected larger swings, but it was not to be.

 

Conclusion:

The Antec Truepower Quattro 1000 watt power supply has earned its stripes, literally. With the racing inspired looks, the ability to start up and run a power hungry system with nary a hiccup speaks volumes about the power supply. If a power supply is struggling with a load, many times you can hear the fans or the water pump changing pitch during operation. I heard none of that with this power supply. In fact I never heard it at all. The ADDA fan used in the Quattro is 80 mm in size and rated at 40dba , 3400RPM and roughly 44CFM. The testing showed the airflow output under load right at 39 to 40CFM, meaning the fan was close to full song at this load level. Not once did I hear the fan spool up and become noisy. All of the 1000+ watt power supplies I have tested have had 120mm or larger fans to move air through the power supply.  This one is different and uses only one low flow 80mm fan. This actually concerned me until I felt the discharged air temperature. Measuring the discharge temperature I came up with an air temperature of 30.5 Celsius under load, Not Bad! As a power supply built with the 80+ standard in mind, the Quattro handles the reduction of the incoming main voltage very well. Heat buildup is a sign of inefficiency, as the excess power has to be dissipated as heat energy, instead of being used to power the computer. It makes sense that the lower the discharge temperature the more efficient the power supply is.

A power supply with modular connections is all the rage right now. Having the ability to pick and choose what cables to use and not have to hide the extras somewhere in the case makes wire management a breeze. Unfortunately, the Quattro is not a fully modular design as I had hoped. The auxiliary 4-pin 12 volt connection, and the two 8-pin PCI-e connections are left to swing in the breeze, or have a hiding place found for them, since they are hard wired into the chassis. This is, by no means a deal breaker, just one of the little things to think about. Speaking of certifications, the Quattro 1000 watt enjoys Nvidia's SLI (Scalable Link Interface) certification, making it an ideal choice for that dual GPU gaming system. If the need is there for a high wattage power supply that is quiet, does not heat up the room, is up to 85% efficient, and just looks striking, then the Antec Truepower Quattro 1000 watt power supply should be on your shopping list come build time.

 

Pros:

 

Cons: