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AMD Ryzen 3 1300X & Ryzen 3 1200 Review

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AMD Ryzen 3 1300X & Ryzen 3 1200 Testing:

Running a processor through a series of workloads can give us an indication of just how it will perform when compared to other processors and platforms. I will be running AMD's Ryzen 3 1300X and Ryzen 3 1200 processors along with a comparison suite of products through OCC's test suite of benchmarks, which include both synthetic benchmarks and real-world applications. The gaming tests will also consist of both synthetic benchmarks and actual gameplay, in which we can see if similarly-prepared setups offer any performance advantages. The system will receive a fully updated, fresh install of Windows 10 Professional 64-bit edition, in addition to the latest chipset drivers for each board and GeForce drivers for the NVIDIA GTX 1080 8GB Founders Edition. To ensure as few variables as possible, all hardware will be tested at their stock speeds, timings, voltages, and latencies, unless otherwise stated. After stock speed testing, each processor will then be overclocked as much as possible, while still maintaining full stability.

Testing Setup: Intel Socket 2066 18 & 16 Core

  • Processors: Intel Core i9 7980XE, Intel Core i9 7960X
  • CPU Cooling: Liquid cooling = EK Block and 360mm Radiator, D5 pump
  • Motherboard: MSI X299 Xpower AC
  • Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 3600MHz 32GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA GTX 1080 8GB Founders Edition
  • Power Supply: Corsair RM1000x
  • Hard Drive: Corsair Force GT 240GB SATA 3
  • Optical Drive: Lite-On Blu-ray
  • Case: Corsair 780T
  • OS: Windows 10 Professional 64-bit

 

Testing Setup: Intel Socket 2066

Testing Setup: AMD AM4 Ryzen 5 & Ryzen 3

  • Processors: AMD Ryzen R5 1600X, R5 1500X, R3 1300X, R3 1200
  • CPU Cooling: Wraith Max
  • Motherboard: ASUS B350 Prime Plus
  • Memory: Geil EVO X 3200MHz 16GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA GTX 1080 8GB Founders Edition
  • Power Supply: Corsair RM1000x
  • Hard Drive: Corsair Force GT 240GB SATA 3
  • Optical Drive: Lite-On Blu-ray
  • Case: Corsair 780T
  • OS: Windows 10 Professional 64-bit

Testing Setup: AMD AM4 Ryzen 7

  • Processors: AMD Ryzen R7 1800X, R7 1700X, R7 1700
  • CPU Cooling: Corsair H110i
  • Motherboard: Gigabyte AX370-Gaming 5 Aorus
  • Memory: Corsair Vengeance 3000MHz 16GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA GTX 1080 8GB Founders Edition
  • Power Supply: Corsair RM1000x
  • Hard Drive: Corsair Force GT 240GB SATA 3
  • Optical Drive: Lite-On Blu-ray
  • Case: Corsair 780T
  • OS: Windows 10 Professional 64-bit

 

Testing Setup: Intel Z270

  • Processors: Intel 7th Generation Core i7 7700K
  • CPU Cooling: Corsair H115i
  • Motherboard: MSI Z270 SLI Plus
  • Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 3600MHz 32GB
  • Video Card: NVIDIA GTX 1080 8GB Founders Edition
  • Power Supply: Corsair RM1000x
  • Hard Drive: Corsair Force GT 240GB SATA 3
  • Optical Drive: Lite-On Blu-ray
  • Case: Corsair 780T
  • OS: Windows 10 Professional 64-bit

 

Testing Setup: Intel (Socket 1151)

 

Testing Setup: Intel (Socket 1150)

 

Testing Setup: AMD (Socket AM3+)

 

Overclocking:

  • AMD Ryzen 3 1200 @ 3990MHz  40 x 100MHz
  • AMD Ryzen 3 1300X @ 4091MHz 41 x 100MHz

 

Overclocking AMD's Ryzen architecture proved to run up to a very hard wall when I looked at the first batch of R7 processors, with results ranging from 3990MHz to 4091MHz with what I would call normal voltages. The R5 processors hit the same wall no matter what I tried. And true to form, with a total sample size of seven processors, right around 4GHz is where you are going to run day in and day out.

Knowing the 4000MHz wall is pretty solid, that is where I started with these two processors. The R3 1300X was the higher overclocking processor of the two and was able to run at almost 4100MHz using a modest 1.43v applied in the BIOS. Cooling was not an issue when using the AMD Wraith Max cooler on either of the processors. The R3 1200 was a little stingier with the clock speeds and finished at an applied 40 x 100MHz clock speed, or a final speed of 3990MHz since It seems you cannot get a clean 100MHz clock speed x the multiplier. To get this result I used 1.40v applied in the BIOS.

Getting the best performance involves looking for that lowest core voltage you can use to get the highest stable clock speeds on Ryzen rather than hammering the voltage to get that last bit of core clock speed. Ryzen has a very definite overclock failure. Instead of a screen hard lock, you get a solid black screen that requires a hard power down to recover from. Overall, there were no real surprises overclocking these processors. For the price of these chips, you can have a little bit of fun without worrying too much about the investment.

 

 

Maximum Core Clock Speed:

Each CPU has been tested for stability at the listed overclocked speeds. These clock speeds will represent the level of performance shown by the overclocked scores in the testing.

 

 

Benchmarks:

  • Scientific & Data:
  1. Apophysis
  2. WinRAR
  3. Bibble 5
  4. Geekbench
  5. Office 2016
  6. POV-Ray 3.7
  7. ProShow Gold
  8. HandBrake 1.0
  9. Sandra 2016
  10. AIDA64
  11. Cinebench R15
  12. X.265 Benchmark
  13. PC Mark 8
  • Video:
  1. Tom Clancy's The Division
  2. Hitman (2016)
  3. 3DMark



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