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Gigabyte A75M-D2H and A75-UD4H Motherboard Review

formerstaff    -   May 8, 2012
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Conclusion:

I have to say that I sort of had certain expectations about the FM1 platform when these boards showed up on my doorstep. I do a lot of heavy content creation and intense gaming, pushing the graphics to the limit of what they offer. I feared that benchmarking this platform was going to be like watching molasses roll up hill in January. I was, however, very surprised with the user experience I had with these FM1 motherboards. While they are aimed at those who have general computing needs, they pack a bit more punch than one might think. Seeing the A-Series architecture instantly shift CPU and GPU resources to where they are needed is impressive to say the least.

The feature set on these boards is terrific as well. I am also intrigued by the numerous graphic options that the UD4H and D2H offer. Should you find yourself needing a bit more graphics horsepower, you can take advantage of AMD's "Dual Graphics" and add an inexpensive 6500 or 6700 discreet graphics card to work in tandem with the onboard Fusion graphics of the A-Series APUs. Even more intriguing is the CrossFire capability that these boards offer. The UD4H has two PCIE slots running at x8/x8, meaning that you will lose little to no performance if you decide to put even a high end pair of cards in a CrossFire configuration. As you saw on the previous page, the results are impressive to say the least for a $115 board paired with a $130 APU. While I am still not sure who the CrossFire capability is aimed at, or who might put graphics cards that cost many times more than the motherboard and APU, it is there and works quite well. It is without a doubt the least expensive way I have seen to game big without breaking the bank on a motherboard and CPU.

I have one complaint with the Gigabyte motherboards and it is that they seem to be a few steps behind in the software utility package offered for these boards and others. The lack of a true UEFI BIOS, an overclock utility that feels and looks like it's from five or six years ago, and the problems I had experienced with it ineffectively communicating with the BIOS to garner correct information and apply settings, all turned me off. I think very highly of Gigabyte's hardware, both in function and features. I just hope the company will get the software up to speed to match the quality and functionality of the hardware it offers. Feature-wise, these boards have a lot offer. There is the dual-BIOS with two physical BIOS ROMs, where one will automatically take over in the event of a BIOS crash or bad flash, 3TB HDD support, one fuse per USB port, and dual-link and multi-display capabilities to go along with the many graphic options. The only thing keeping these boards from getting the coveted gold award is the sub-par software utilities. I really hope and expect Gigabyte will improve this situation in the near future, if the "3D" UEFI on the Intel side is any indication.

 

Pros: GA-A75-UD4H

  • Price
  • Features
  • Build Quality
  • Graphics Options

 

Cons:

  • Software Package

 

 

 

Pros: GA-A75M-D2H

  • Price
  • Features
  • Build Quality
  • Graphic Options

 

Cons:

  • Software Package


 

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