Welcome Stranger to OCC!Login | Register

News Archives for July 2017

Microsoft's Next Windows Update to Include Malware Fighting A.I.

Posted: July 2, 2017 @ time: 09:47PM
Author: scr4wl

Microsoft has announced an update to the Windows 10 Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) enterprise service, which will reportedly be much better at preventing cyber attacks. According to the folks in Redmond, ATP will use data from cloud-based services in order to create what has been dubbed an A.I. anti-virus. Apparently, one of the features of the A.I. will be that it can instantly detect previously unknown malware on a client's computer. The malicious software can then be quarantined in the cloud where a signature for its identity is created. This ultimately allows ATP to further protect other computers from being infected. It currently takes researchers countless hours to create defense mechanisms when new malware is created. ATP should now be able to help speed up this process immensely.

For the time being, these upgrades will only be available to enterprise customers, although they may be available to ordinary users in the future. Microsoft will be releasing the Fall Creators' preview, and subsequently the updated version of ATP, sometime between September and October, which is when we can expect to start seeing the ATP updates (and perhaps some more in-depth information as to how well it performs).

Source: Engadget


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Monday, July 3, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 3, 2017 @ time: 07:46AM
Author: bp9801

A new week is here, with the monthly already a couple days in. We have a review on the AMD Radeon Vega Frontier Edition graphics card, which is a professional level card that can do some gaming, but will be far more comfortable in a business environment than consumer. If you want some extra power for your laptop, perhaps the Gigabyte Aorus GTX 1070 Gaming Box is for you, offering a high-end card to let you game on your laptop. We have a look at the Cooler Master Devastator 3 Keyboard and Mouse Combo, providing an entry into the world of gaming peripherals without breaking the bank. There's a review on the Razer Hammerhead BT wireless earbuds to hear what they can bring to your music. We wrap up with an article taking a look at how to use a 4K TV as a computer monitor.

Video Cards
AMD Radeon Vega Frontier Edition @ PC Perspective
Gigabyte Aorus GTX 1070 Gaming Box @ TechSpot

Keyboards/Mice
Cooler Master Devastator 3 Keyboard and Mouse Combo @ Madshrimps

Speakers/Headphones
Razer Hammerhead BT @ LanOC Reviews

Miscellany
Using a 4K TV as a Desktop Monitor @ TechSpot


Complete Story


Intel X299 Platform Appears to Have Serious VRM Issues

Posted: July 3, 2017 @ time: 04:20PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

With AMD's successful Ryzen processors, competition has returned to the CPU market, but Intel may have dropped the ball with its recent launch of the X299 platform for its X-Series processors. This series of processors is supposed to span from a lowly 4-core all the way up to an 18-core/36-thread behemoth, though only the CPUs up to the 10-core/20-thread i9-7900X are available now. The catch is that it seems Intel decided to move up the platform launch in response to AMD's success and impending Ryzen Threadripper launch and cut out too much time for motherboard manufacturers to get it right.

According to overclocker "der8auer," the platform is currently a "VRM disaster" with temperatures reaching far too high, leading to issues of inconsistency between different motherboards. When he was testing a CPU known to reach 5.0 GHz in a Gigabyte Aorus motherboard he found he could not even reach 4.6 GHz because of dangerously high VRM temperatures. An MSI board demonstrated similar issues, indicating this is not isolated. He also found that removing the stock heatsink from the VRMs, which der8auer likened to 'heat insulation' more than a cooler, and placing a small fan over the bare VRMs did a significantly better job.

Additionally der8auer feels the single 8-pin connector on some motherboards is not enough to provide the necessary power to the CPU. However the PSU-tester Jon Gerow, or Jonnyguru, has suggested the PSU shown in the video has a poor design leading to a higher cable temperature than would be seen with other power supplies.

What this appears to come down to is that Intel may have rushed the X299 platform out so early that it left motherboard manufacturers without enough time to properly develop their products. Of course the Gigabyte and MSI motherboards this has been found on are entry to mid-range options, so their more expensive brethren may not have these issues. These still seem to be unfortunate and likely avoidable problems that perhaps Intel cannot afford to make opposite AMD Ryzen's success.

Source: TechPowerUp and der8auer YouTube video


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Wednesday, July 5, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 5, 2017 @ time: 07:41AM
Author: bp9801

The middle of the week is here, with several items to get you going. We have a review of the Gigabyte X299 Aorus Gaming 3 motherboard, offering a more affordable solution for those stepping into the higher-end Intel CPUs. The new AMD Radeon Vega Frontier Edition card might not be intended purely for gaming, but that doesn't mean some CrossFire testing can't happen to see exactly what two can do together. The MSI Core Frozr XL CPU Cooler gets reviewed to see if the larger size and dual fans help out more with cooling. For those after some power, the SeaSonic FOCUS PLUS Gold (FX) 650W PSU gets reviewed to check if it should be powering your rig. There are several other items to get to as well, such as the Razer Lancehead mouse, a QNAP NAS, and more, so hit them all up below.

Motherboards
Gigabyte X299 Aorus Gaming 3 @ LanOC Reviews

Video Cards
AMD Radeon Vega Frontier Edition CrossFire Testing @ PC Perspective

CPU Cooling
MSI Core Frozr XL CPU Cooler @ Neoseeker

Power Supplies
SeaSonic FOCUS PLUS Gold (FX) 650W @ PC Perspective

Mice/Keyboards
Razer Lancehead @ TechSpot

Storage/Hard Drives
QNAP TS-653B 6-bay QTS-Linux Combo Quad-core NAS with PCIe @ Madshrimps

Networking
TP-Link Deco M5 Whole Home WiFi System @ ThinkComputers

Miscellany
TechSpot PC Buying Guide @ TechSpot
20 of the Worst PC Setups - June 2017 @ ThinkComputers


Complete Story


NVIDIA Investigated Multi-Chip-Module GPUs in Research Paper

Posted: July 5, 2017 @ time: 11:00AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Necessity is the mother of invention, and the semiconductor industry is quickly approaching a limit to current technologies. This is because consumers and professionals keep demanding more and more performance but there are physical limitations we are approaching. A solution needs to be found for this demand to be met and NVIDIA, Arizona State University, University of Texas at Austin, and Barcelona Supercomputer Center recently worked together to research one of these approaches: multi-chip-modules.

To continue increasing the amount of computing power, more transistors are needed and traditionally this has been achieved by improving monolithic designs or, in the case of GPUs using a multi-GPU system. The monolithic approach has worked for a long time now, but is approaching the limits of silicon feature size and the aperture size of the lithography systems used to create the processors. A multi-GPU system removes the size concern but presents latency issues because of how long it takes to transmit information between two different processors as well as load-balancing concerns. By going with a multi-chip-module GPU though, which stitches together multiple processors onto a single substrate, the size limitations are worked around with far less latency than a multi-GPU system.

According to the research paper, an MCM-GPU appears to very much be a desirable solution, based on the simulations run as part of the work. With an optimized design to address bandwidth, latency, and load-imbalance concerns between GPU modules, an MCM-GPU with 256 streaming multiprocessors (SMs) was 45.5% faster than the largest possible monolithic GPU with 128 SMs and 26.8% better than a multi-GPU system using two such GPUs. When compared to a hypothetical 256 SM monolithic GPU, the MCM-GPU came within 10% of its performance, so while it is not perfect, it is very close.

AMD is also working on MCM designs, with the recently released EPYC CPUs being MCM processors using Infinity Fabric to connect four Zeppelin dies, and Navi GPU architecture likely to use Infinity Fabric in a similar manner. When NVIDIA might actually create an MCM-GPU is hard to guess, but with both companies at least considering this direction, it will be interesting to see what comes.

Source: NVIDIA


Complete Story


3D RRAM Chip Combines Data Storage and Computing

Posted: July 6, 2017 @ time: 11:10AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

The rate of innovation is always increasing as new creations lead to more new projects, but this progress is not uniform. In some instances the ability to produce something can come to outpace the ability to use it, and this is happening with data currently. Right now we have the ability to generate more data than many systems can efficiently handle, but there are many researchers working to change that, including some at MIT and Stanford University where a very advanced chip has been created that combines data storage and processing.

This new chip combines two technologies that can still be considered futuristic for computers; carbon nanotubes and a 3D architecture. Modern computer chips have a 2D design, though some have a 2.5D design with layers stacked and connected to each other. The benefit to a full 3D design is that the multiple parts of the chip are able to communicate with each other much more quickly and efficiently than what is currently possible. Carbon nanotubes can also take this to a new level as their small size and electrical properties allow the chips to be made denser. In this case the chip is a form of resistive random-access memory (RRAM), which is a kind of nonvolatile memory and has some one million RRAM cells and two million carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. This combination of memory and computing removes the bandwidth bottleneck between data and processing that is an issue with today's largest datasets.

To prove the capabilities of this design, the researchers also added over one million nanotube-based sensors for detecting and classifying gases. The measurements from the sensors were processed all in parallel and written directly to memory, thanks to this integrated design of emerging nanotechnologies. What makes this accomplishment even more impressive is that the chip is compatible with CMOS, so such an RRAM chip could be combined with current silicon chips and there is a fair chance there will be many more applications for this design in the future.

Source: MIT


Complete Story


Microsoft's Edge Browser Struggling to Attract Users While Chrome Dominates

Posted: July 6, 2017 @ time: 09:50PM
Author: scr4wl

It appears as though Microsoft's Edge browser is struggling to acquire more users, while Chrome is used by a majority of them. According to, Stat Counter Google's Chrome browser is used by over 60% of all computer users. Microsoft's Edge browser, on the other hand, is only used by 3.89% of users. The market shares of Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, and Opera are also astonishingly low when compared to Chrome. Safari is the clear runner up with only 14% of the market share, and has seen only a .5% increase in users. Other popular browsers, like Firefox, actually appear to be losing their market share. It is clear that Google's Chrome browser is winning the popularity contest!

Source: Slashdot


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Friday, July 7, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 7, 2017 @ time: 07:44AM
Author: bp9801

Friday is here at last, with several items along the way to get you to the weekend. We have a review of the Intel Core i7 7740X and Core i5 7640X CPUs, the Kaby Lake-X parts that might provide you a new boost to your rig. There's a look at the Gigabyte X299 AORUS Gaming 3 motherboard, offering an affordable option for those stepping into the Skylake-X and Kaby Lake-X line. If you're after a new keyboard, perhaps the Corsair K68 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard, with its spill and dust resistance, is for you. Or maybe it's the Cherry MX Board Silent, with its quiet key design to help eliminate the noise typically associated with mechanical switches. There's a look at the ability to use external graphics with Thunderbolt 3 over the AKiTiO Node, a device perfect for bringing big video card potential to laptops. We wrap things up with a podcast covering the latest news and reviews of the past week.

CPUs
Core i7-7740X & Core i5-7640X @ TechSpot

Motherboards
GIGABYTE X299 AORUS Gaming 3 @ PC Perspective

Keyboards/Mice
Cherry MX Board Silent Keyboard @ Benchmark Reviews
Corsair K68 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard @ ThinkComputers

Miscellany
External Graphics over Thunderbolt 3 using the AKiTiO Node @ PC Perspective
Podcast #457 @ PC Perspective


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Monday, July 10, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 10, 2017 @ time: 08:00AM
Author: bp9801

A new week is here, with several items to kick it off. We have a review of the HP S700 Pro 512GB SSD, which has an SMI SM2258 controller and Micro 3D TLC NAND to make it fast and competitive in the market. There's a look at the AZIO Retro Classic mechanical keyboard, which sports a classic look and plenty of modern features. If you're after a new mouse, perhaps the ROCCAT Leadr Wireless Multi-Button RGB Gaming Mouse, with its wired/wireless design and 14 buttons, is the one for you. Wrapping things up is the Autonomous DIY SmartDesk Kit Business Edition, which turns your desk into one you can easily stand at in order to avoid sitting for too long.

Storage/Hard Drives
HP S700 Pro 512GB Solid State Drive @ ThinkComputers

Keyboards/Mice
AZIO Retro Classic @ LanOC Reviews
ROCCAT Leadr Wireless Multi-Button RGB Gaming Mouse @ Madshrimps

Miscellany
Autonomous DIY SmartDesk Kit Business Edition @ LanOC Reviews


Complete Story


System Developed for Optimizing Use of Caches

Posted: July 10, 2017 @ time: 02:25PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

A fundamental part of every processor is its caches, where the cores can keep what information they need for performing the operations assigned to them. As these caches are on on-chip, accessing them is very fast, but that does not mean there are not better ways to allocate the cache space among the cores. Researchers at MIT have developed a system called Jenga that finds the optimal distribution of not only the local cache but also DRAM for a CPU.

Two advantages to having caches built into a chip are that accessing the data in the caches is very fast and it takes little energy to do so, compared to off-chip memory. This makes optimizing the use of a chip's cache rather valuable, but modern chips need to be designed as a compromise between the capacity and latency needs of various programs. What Jenga does is measure the latency between each processor core and each cache it can access and uses that information to build a cache hierarchy. The hierarchy considers the differences between different levels of cache, like the on-chip L1, L2, and L3 caches but Jenga actually also makes measurements for using DRAM. Once the optimal cache level is determined, algorithms from an older system called Jigsaw are used to optimally allocate the caches for the entire chip. Jenga builds on Jigsaw by considering cache level in its algorithms, but the Jigsaw algorithms for optimizing along the latency-capacity curve are still valid once level is determined.

The researchers tested Jenga by simulating a system with 36 cores and found it could increase processing speed by 20-30% while reducing energy consumption by 30-85%. A fairly significant improvement for something that just improves how the hardware is used, and as more and more cores are added to CPUs, this could become an even more valuable system.

Source: MIT


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Tuesday, July 11, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 11, 2017 @ time: 07:56AM
Author: bp9801

Tuesday is upon us, with several items to keep you going today. We have a review of the In Win 301 Mini Tower case, a sleek and compact case that mimics the 303 design, just with something smaller. There's a look at the HP S700 500GB SSD, offering a ton of storage and fast speeds for a fairly affordable price. If you need a new way to keep your USB devices powered, perhaps the FSP Amport 62 6-port USB Charger is the one for you. We wrap up with a look at the DOOGEE Y6 Moonlight Blue Smartphone, providing a 5.5" HD display and plenty of features for a low price.

Cases
In Win 301 Mini Tower @ Benchmark Reviews

Storage/Hard Drives
HP S700 500GB SSD @ Neoseeker

Gadgets
FSP Amport 62 6-port USB Charger @ OCAU

Mobile
DOOGEE Y6 Moonlight Blue Smartphone @ Madshrimps


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Wednesday, July 12, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 12, 2017 @ time: 07:40AM
Author: bp9801

The middle of the week is here, with a few items along for the ride. We have an article looking at the Intel Core i7 7800X versus the 7700K to see if six cores or four cores are better for you when gaming. There's a look at the Intel Xeon Scalable processor launch and what it means for the world of data centers and businesses (and maybe consumers). We wrap up with a review on the ROCCAT Nyth Gaming Mouse, featuring 12 modular side buttons you can swap around for the best fit for you and your MMO/MOBA of choice.

CPUs
Core i7-7800X vs. 7700K, 6 or 4 Cores for Gaming? @ TechSpot
Intel Xeon Scalable Processor Launch @ PC Perspective

Mice/Keyboards
ROCCAT Nyth Gaming Mouse @ ThinkComputers


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Thursday, July 13,2017, Edition

Posted: July 13, 2017 @ time: 07:44AM
Author: bp9801

The week is starting to wind down, but not before some items come along for the ride. We have a preview of the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X and 1920X CPUs, offering the potential for massive performance with prices that top out at $999. There's a look at the HP S700 SSD, with the 500GB model tested to see just what it can bring to your system. The prospect of 10 Gigabit Ethernet is starting to become a reality for consumers, with items like the ASUS ASUS XG-C100C NIC tested to show just what benefit it can bring to your transfer speeds. We end things for today with something a little different, as the TP-Link LB130 WiFi LED Bulb with RGB gets put to the test to if it should belong in your smart home.

CPUs
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X and 1920X Announced: Flagship Performance at $999 @ PC Perspective

Storage/Hard Drives
HP SSD S700 @ Benchmark Reviews

Networking
ASUS XG-C100C NIC @ PC Perspective

Miscellany
TP-Link LB130 WiFi LED Bulb with RGB @ LanOC Reviews


Complete Story


AMD Reveals Some Threadripper and R3 Information

Posted: July 13, 2017 @ time: 04:59PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

At long last AMD has finally released some specs for the upcoming Ryzen Threadripper and Ryzen R3 CPUs, which complete the Ryzen lineup at the top and bottom, respectively. The two R3 processors are 4-core/4-thread CPUs with the R3 1200 sporting a base clock of 3.1 GHz and a boost of 3.4 GHz, while the R3 1300X will have a base of 3.5 GHz and a boost of 3.7 GHz. The R3 CPUs will also be launching later this month on July 27, and as they use the AM4 socket they can installed in the already available A320, B350, and X370 motherboards.

For those looking for high end desktop (HEDT) CPUs, we not only have some clock speed information on the Threadripper processors but even prices and a release window. Starting at the top, the Ryzen Threadripper 1950X, with its 16 cores and 32 threads, will have a base clock of 3.4 GHz and a boost of 4.0 GHz. Its suggested retail price is just $999, matching Intel's 10-core/20-thread i9-7900X CPU (3.3 GHz base with 4.3 GHz boost under Turbo Boost 2.0 or 4.5 GHz with Turbo Boost 3.0). The 12-core/24-thread Threadripper 1920X has a base clock of 3.5 GHz and a boost of 4.0 GHz and will be priced at $799. The video embedded below also shares some performance numbers for these CPUs from Cinebench R15.

These two Threadripper CPUs will be available early August, and we will also be getting more details on them following the R3 launch later this month. Do not forget that at SIGGRAPH, also the end of this month, more information on Vega GPUs will be released as well.

 

 

Source: AMD


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Friday, July 14, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 14, 2017 @ time: 07:32AM
Author: bp9801

Friday is here at last, with a few items to kick off the weekend. We have a review of the Shuttle XPC Slim DS77U Barebone, a thin model that features an Intel Kaby Lake processor of several different varieties to better fit exactly what you need in a PC that can run 24/7. There's a look at the Huawei P10 smartphone, the flagship product that looks to compete against other high-end smartphones in a fashion a little different than what those do. We finish things off with a podcast covering the latest news and reviews of the past week.

Prebuilts
Shuttle XPC Slim DS77U Barebone @ Madshrimps

Mobile
Huawei P10 @ TechSpot

Miscellany
Podcast #458 @ PC Perspective


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Monday, July 17, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 17, 2017 @ time: 07:35AM
Author: bp9801

A new week is here, with several items kicking it off. We have a review of the AMD Radeon Vega Frontier Edition 16GB video card, with this one sporting a liquid cooler instead of the air cooler on other Vega Frontier Edition cards. There are a couple of takes on the HyperX Alloy Elite Mechanical Keyboard, featuring Cherry MX Red switches and red LED backlighting, along with a host of other features, to see if this high-end keyboard should find its home on your desk. We have a look at the Sennheiser Game Zero headset, a gaming-centric model that can work on PC, Mac, consoles, and even mobile devices. For some portable computing, there is a review of the ASUS ZenBook 3 UX390UA laptop, a 12.5" model packed to the brim with hardware. If you're instead after something a little more focused for the home, yet still small, perhaps the MSI Trident 3 Arctic Gaming PC is for you. Wrapping things up for today is a look at what games Ultrabooks are capable of playing.

Video Cards
AMD Radeon Vega Frontier Edition 16GB Liquid-Cooled @ PC Perspective

Keyboards/Mice
HyperX Alloy Elite Mechanical Gaming Keyboard @ ThinkComputers
HyperX Alloy Elite Mechanical Keyboard @ LanOC Reviews

Speakers/Headphones
Sennheiser Game Zero Headset @ LanOC Reviews

Laptops/Tablets
ASUS ZenBook 3 UX390UA @ PC Perspective
What Games Can Ultrabooks Really Play? @ TechSpot

Prebuilts
MSI Trident 3 Arctic Gaming PC @ TechSpot


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Tuesday, July 18, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 18, 2017 @ time: 07:58AM
Author: bp9801

Tuesday is upon us, with several items ready for your viewing pleasure. We have a look at the AMD Ryzen 3 1200 and 1300, or rather a simulation of what to expect from their likely performance once the chips are available. There's a review on the ADATA XPG SX950 240GB SSD, offering 560MB/s reads and 520MB/s writes to give gamers plenty of speed for their system. If you need a new way to control your PC, maybe the Corsair K68 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard, with its LED backlighting and Cherry MX Red switches, is the one for you. For another means of control, the Cooler Master MasterMouse S Gaming Mouse, which has customizable DPI and even a button to nearly double the amount of usable buttons on the mouse.

CPUs
Simulating AMD Ryzen 3 1200, 1300 Performance @ TechSpot

Storage/Hard Drives
ADATA XPG SX950 240GB SSD @ ThinkComputers

Keyboards/Mice
Corsair K68 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard @ Benchmark Reviews
Cooler Master MasterMouse S Gaming Mouse @ Madshrimps


Complete Story


UK WiFi Provider Keeps Sewers Clean By Tricking Customers

Posted: July 18, 2017 @ time: 11:25AM
Author: scr4wl

Customers in the United Kingdom unknowingly agreed to perform one thousand hours of community service in exchange for using a public WiFi hotspot. The WiFi provider, Purple, decided to sneak the clause into its terms and conditions, knowing that most people would never read it. In what has been described as a, "technically legally binding agreement," users agreed to unclog sewers and scrape gum off the streets. The list of duties also included cleaning up animal litter, cleaning portable bathrooms, painting snail shells to brighten their existence, and hugging stray cats and dogs.

Purple reportedly performed the hoax in order to show that users may be agreeing to things they would not like in those pesky terms and conditions. Examples could be granting access to private information, or providing data of your web browsing habits. In addition to the hoax, the WiFi provider also included a clause stating that you would be given a prize if you actually read the terms and conditions. It appears as though only one person actually claimed this prize.

Source: UPI


Complete Story


Intel Calls AMD's Naples '4-Glued Together Desktop Dies'

Posted: July 18, 2017 @ time: 11:29AM
Author: scr4wl

Intel takes the offensive in its recent press workshop as it points out many of Naples, so called, shortcomings. Intel presented several slides explaining the downsides of AMD's recent offering, even going so far as to call it "4-Glued Together Desktop Dies." Intel further points out that Zen is AMD's first new architecture in six years and that AMD's new architecture will stick around for four. Intel was happy to compare its new Skylake-SP architecture to Naples, noting that Skylake-SP is 28 "true" cores. This seems to be somewhat reminiscent of the Core 2 Quad days, when Intel was combining dies to create multi-chip packages and AMD was producing a "true" quad-core chip.

As you would expect from slides coming from Intel, a lot of the information is pro-Intel and anti-AMD. That said, there is some good information about Intel's Skylake-SP architecture. The slides touch upon Skylake-SP's improved virtualization and VM performance, as well as it's improved SMT performance. As with the rest of the slides, Intel doesn't hesitate to point out that Skylake-SP has more than double the memory bandwidth, and close to double the PCIe bandwidth, of AMD's offering. Regardless of what Intel may say, I for one am glad to see AMD releasing some competition again.

Source: WCCFtech


Complete Story


Absolver Gets New Trailer, Pre-order and Collector's Edition Details

Posted: July 18, 2017 @ time: 04:41PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

With its release coming at the end of August, Absolver, the online melee action game from Slocap and Devolver Digital have revealed the title's pre-order bonuses, what the Collector's Edition contains, and a new trailer featuring weapons and powers gameplay. Players will be able to equip Tension Shards that can fill during the course of a battle, enabling powers to be used and weapons to be formed. You will need to be careful with these weapons though, as they can break or you can be disarmed and see them turned against you.

For those considering pre-ordering the game, you will enjoy 10% off the base price or $29.99, the Labyrinth Prospect mask, and Uring Priest gear. The limited batch of physical Absolver Collector's Editions from Special Reserve Games include a 52-page The Art of Absolver book, a sticker pack, and an ultra-premium, wearable Prospect mask with display stand, in addition to the PS4 disk or Steam key for PC download. The Collector's Edition will cost $74.99 though.

Absolver launches on August 29 for PC and PlayStation 4.

 

 

Source: Press Release


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Wednesday, July 19, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 19, 2017 @ time: 07:55AM
Author: bp9801

The middle of the week is here, with a few items to get you through the day. We have a review of the ASUS TUF Z270 Mark 1 motherboard, featuring all the usual Z270 options that are then enhanced with the TUF armor and an eye towards stability instead of outright performance. There's a look at the EpicGear Melodiouz In-Ear Gaming Headset, offering a secure fit and sound isolation to fully immerse you in your games. Wrapping things up is the Silicon Power xDrive Z50 Dual USB Flash Drive review, which lets you transfer items between PC, Mac, and even iOS devices without hassle.

Motherboards
ASUS TUF Z270 Mark 1 @ PC Perspective

Speakers/Headphones
EpicGear Melodiouz In-Ear Gaming Headset @ ThinkComputers

Storage/Hard Drives
Silicon Power xDrive Z50 Dual USB Flash Drive @ Madshrimps


Complete Story


Intel Preparing 6-Core Coffee Lake CPUs

Posted: July 19, 2017 @ time: 08:45PM
Author: scr4wl

It is reported that Intel will release new 6-core CPUs, based on the Coffee Lake architecture, in a few months. On the high end, the i7 8700K should come in clocked at around 3.7GHz and provide a total of twelve threads when Hyperthreading is enabled. At 95W, the i7 8700K will have a much lower TDP than the Core i9 7800X and its TDP of 140W. Intel will be releasing an i7 8700 non-K series, which will be clocked at around 3.2GHz. The rumor mill is also suggesting that we will see 6-core CPUs in the i5 series, although Hyperthreading will be disabled.

It is also said that for the first time ever, Intel will be introducing pure mobile 6-core CPUs. As you can imagine, Coffee Lake mobile will have much lower clock speeds at around 2GHz, and a much lower TDP at 45W. Finally, it is also reported that we will see a Coffee Lake quad-core CPU featuring a 28W TDP and targeted at low power notebooks.

Source: Videocardz


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Friday, July 21, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 21, 2017 @ time: 07:44AM
Author: bp9801

Friday is here, with a few items to help you out before the weekend kicks off. We have a look at the AMD Ryzen 5 1600 versus the Intel Core i7-7800X in a 30 game battle to see which one comes out on top to be considered for your system. There's an article looking at 3D printing a solar light peg to help present a solution when one of the pegs break as you're putting the light in the ground. We wrap up with a podcast covering the latest news and reviews of the week.

CPUs
AMD Ryzen 5 1600 vs Intel Core i7-7800X: 30 Game Battle! @ TechSpot

Miscellany
Functional Prints: Solar Light Peg @ LanOC Reviews
Podcast #459 @ PC Perspective


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Monday, July 24, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 24, 2017 @ time: 07:50AM
Author: bp9801

A new week begins, with July starting to wind down and a few items to kick it off. We have a review of the ASUS ROG Zephyrus GX501 GTX 1080 Max-Q Gaming Notebook, offering a look at the new tech and just what it might mean for gaming laptops down the road as the tech comes into its own. There's a review of the VisionTek SoundTube Pro Wireless Speaker to hear what the company's take on the portable speaker is like and if you should get one. Our final article for today looks at the most awkward moments in tech that have happened from executives and others while showing off something new.

Laptops/Tablets
ASUS ROG Zephyrus GX501 GTX 1080 Max-Q Gaming Notebook @ PC Perspective

Speakers/Headphones
VisionTek SoundTube Pro Wireless Speaker @ LanOC Reviews

Miscellany
The Most Awkward Moments in Tech @ TechSpot


Complete Story


CPU Engineer Leaves Intel After Twenty Years

Posted: July 24, 2017 @ time: 08:49PM
Author: scr4wl

Long-term Intel CPU Engineer Francois Piednoel has recently tweeted that he will be leaving the company. In the tweet, Piednoel said, "I am informed my management that I do not wish to continue my employment at Intel. New adventures coming, very exciting!" Piednoel, who has worked for Intel for the past twenty years as a senior architecture engineer, was involved in the development of some of Intel's biggest CPU architectures. The list of projects he worked on includes Katmai, Conroe, Penryn, and Nahalem. Further, he also had a hand in developing SoC's in Sandy Bridge, Ivy Bridge, Haswell, Broadwell, Skylake, and Kaby Lake. While nothing is known what Piednoel will do now that he has resigned, there is no talk of him moving to AMD. In fact, according to this source, Piednoel has rejected that assumption.

Source: Tweaktown


Complete Story


Super Cloudbuilt Now Available

Posted: July 25, 2017 @ time: 05:32PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Super Cloudbuilt from Coilworks and Double Eleven has finally released on Steam and PlayStation 4, with the Xbox One version launching on Friday. In Super Cloudbuilt you play as Demi, a young soldier who wakes up in an unfamiliar world and learn her story as you explore the world. Exploring involves leaping between platforms above an abyss, dashing across walls and up ledges, and destroying hazards that that are in your way. There are shortcuts and alternate paths to take that may help you reach the top of the leaderboards. With 177 challenges across its Story, Ranked, and Rush modes, Super Cloudbuilt has a lot for players to master their techniques with. Super Cloudbuilt is $19.99 but is enjoying 10% during this launch week.


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Wednesday, July 26, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 26, 2017 @ time: 07:42AM
Author: bp9801

The middle of the week is upon us, with a couple of items to get you over the day. There is a review of the MSI Clutch GM60 and GM70 Gaming Mice, with both featuring plenty of style and features, like interchangeable grips, and the GM70 also adding in wireless capabilities. Our other item for the day is a look at the Logitech BRIO, a 4K webcam that connects via USB 3.0 to provide exceptional quality and clarity.

Mice/Keyboards
MSI Clutch GM60 & GM70 Gaming Mice @ Neoseeker

Gadgets
Logitech BRIO @ LanOC Reviews


Complete Story


AMD Releases Radeon 17.7.2 Drivers With New and Returning Features

Posted: July 26, 2017 @ time: 06:23PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Today AMD released a new GPU driver, Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.7.2, that has a number of improvements but also some nice new features targeting gamers and developers. Starting with the improvements, optimizations and reduced overhead for DirectX 9 and select DirectX 11 titles should improve responsiveness and some games should be loading faster as well. The Radeon ReLive recorder has also gotten some attention bitrates up to 100 Mbps being supported, lower overhead from optimizing memory usage, new controls for camera transparency, new notifications, and enhanced audio controls allowing you to customize microphone volume, audio boost for captured replays, and push to talk support for the microphone. Radeon Chill, which will intelligently lower framerate to reduce GPU workload, now supports games using DX12 and Vulkan, and multi-GPU systems, hybrid graphics configurations, and Radeon XConnect systems can all use the feature. Frame rate target control also now supports DirectX 12 and multi-GPU systems.

On the returning features front, Radeon Additional Settings has been retired with the controls it supported coming to Radeon Settings, including switchable graphics, color depth, and pixel format. Also there are per-display color controls now, allowing brightness, hue, contrast, and saturation all to be set in the display tab. WattMan has also gotten some additions with support for memory underclocking and power state controls.

For new features, we have Enhanced Sync targeting gamers and Radeon GPU Profiler aiming for developers. Enhanced Sync is a new VSync option meant to prevent screen-tearing while keeping latency low. The information specifically states it achieves at an unlocked frame rate, and looking at one of the graphs on the Enhanced Sync page, it appears this solution does not require reaching multiples of your refresh rate, though testing may be needed to confirm this. It also tries to avoid issues at low frame rate without introducing lag as well. Radeon GPU Profiler is a tool to allow developers to capture and analyze low level, built-in hardware thread tracing for DirectX 12 and Vulkan on Fiji and Polaris GPUs. Basically it will allow developers to precisely see what is happening within a GPU to identify bottlenecks and stalls, as well as to analyze async compute usage.

 

 

Source: Radeon.com and AMD


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Thursday, July 27, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 27, 2017 @ time: 07:33AM
Author: bp9801

The week is starting to wind down, but not before there are some items for you to check out. We have multiple looks at the new AMD Ryzen 3 1200 and 1300X CPUs, bringing quad-core performance to the entry-level segment without breaking the bank. There's an article examining the AZIO Retro Classic Mechanical Keyboard to give us an idea of what to expect when the final product hits shelves. For some mobile needs, there's a review on the OnePlus 5 smartphone, which offers high-end hardware for a price that's just right. We wrap things up with a comparison of the Microsoft Surface Pro and the Apple iPad Pro to see what one you should get.

CPUs
AMD Ryzen 3 1300X and 1200 @ PC Perspective
AMD Ryzen R3 CPUs @ LanOC Reviews
AMD Ryzen 3 Series @ Madshrimps
AMD Ryzen 3 @ TechSpot
AMD Ryzen 3 1200 & 1300X @ Neoseeker

Keyboards/Mice
AZIO Retro Classic Mechanical Keyboard @ Benchmark Reviews

Mobile
OnePlus 5 @ TechSpot

Laptops/Tablets
Microsoft Surface Pro (2017) vs. Apple iPad Pro (2017): Best Productivity Tablet @ PC Perspective


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Friday, July 28, 2017, Edition

Posted: July 28, 2017 @ time: 07:32AM
Author: bp9801

Friday is here, with July nearly in the books. We have a couple of items for you today, starting with a look at the DOOGEE Shoot 1 smartphone. It's a budget-friendly model with an impressive camera and hardware, although it does have a few wrinkles that are explored in the review. Our other item for the day is a podcast covering the latest news and reviews of the past week.

Mobile
DOOGEE Shoot 1 @ Madshrimps

Miscellany
Podcast #460 @ PC Perspective


Complete Story


Full Specs of Intel Core-X Series Revealed

Posted: July 28, 2017 @ time: 07:15PM
Author: scr4wl

A slide revealing the full specs of Intel's Core-X lineup has started appearing around the Internet. The slide, which has not been officially confirmed, contains specs on nine new chips from Intel. According to the slide we can expect to see Intel's flagship 18-core, 36-thread, i9-7980XE clocked at 2.6Ghz and supporting 44 PCIe 3.0 lanes. It appears as though the i9-7980XE will be capable of a 4.4Ghz boost frequency and is also equipped with a 24.75MB L3 cache. As we've come to expect from flagship Intel chips, the i9-7980XE will carry a hefty price tag of $1,999. A more reasonably priced, 6-core, i7-7800X comes clocked at 3.5Ghz with a $389 price tag.

Source: videocardz


Complete Story


© 2001-2017 Overclockers Club ® Privacy Policy
Elapsed: 0.0265400410   (xlweb1)