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News Archives for May 2013

Hardware Roundup: Wednesday Edition

Posted: May 1, 2013 @ time: 08:39AM
Author: bp9801

There's a lot to cover today, so let's dive right in. We have two different looks at AMD's new heterogeneous Uniform Memory Access (hUMA), which is a key component in Kaveri, the successor to the Trinity APUs. The idea behind hUMA is to allow the CPU and GPU to share memory resources to help things move along even faster than they do already. Check out the links to see just how it performs. On a different front, there's a new Frame Rating article on how different high end GPUs handle the massive 4K resolution, as well as a be quiet! CPU cooler. We also have a 4GB flash drive from takeMS, a speaker system from Ineo, and even a wireless storage drive from ADATA.

CPUs
AMD Details hUMA: HSA In Action! @ PC Perspective
AMD's new heterogeneous Uniform Memory Access @ Bjorn3D

Video Cards
Frame Rating: High End GPUs Benchmarked at 4K Resolutions @ PC Perspective

CPU Cooling
be quiet! Shadow Rock TopFlow SR1 @ ThinkComputers

Storage/Hard Drives
takeMS LumX 4GB USB Flash Drive @ Madshrimps
ADATA DashDrive Air AE400 Wireless Storage @ Benchmark Reviews

Speakers/Headphones
Ineo Alienvibes W401 Speaker System @ Benchmark Reviews


Complete Story


'A Boy and His Atom' Premiers at IBM

Posted: May 1, 2013 @ time: 09:05AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Let it never be said that scientists do not need to have some fun every now and then. A group of nanophysicists at IBM have created the world's smallest movie as the actors in it are made from carbon monoxide molecules.

To create the stop-motion film, the researchers turned to their scanning tunneling electron microscope, which moves a needle across the surface of its subject. By moving the needle in, closer than needed for collecting data, the researchers were able to use the attraction between it and the carbon monoxide to reposition the molecules for each frame.

This work has come after IBM researchers achieved the smallest magnetic bit consisting of just 12 atoms, which represents a dramatic increase in potential data storage density.

 

 

Moving Atoms: Making The World's Smallest Movie

Source: IBM


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Corsair Dismisses Rumor About Being For Sale

Posted: May 1, 2013 @ time: 01:46PM
Author: Prunes

There has been a rumor about Corsair being bought by Francisco Partners, a private equity firm; however, that rumor has now been dismissed by Corsair. Corsair told Maximum PC that the rumor is inaccurate, but the company is instead looking for investments. Corsair sent a FAQ to Maximum PC, which explains that "we would like to make more acquisitions and this requires outside investment." Corsair tried to acquire the needed funding through public funding, but that idea was discarded. Corsair estimated that the company would not be able to obtain the required funding using that method, since it is selling to niche markets, which limits the amount of people interested in buying shares. Instead Francisco Partners offered the needed funding in exchange for a share of the company. Despite Francisco Partners obtaining part of Corsair, the hardware company will still operate the way it always has. The newly obtained funding will be used to purchase small, less well-run companies that produce technology Corsair can benefit from to ensure continuous growth and an ever expanding product catalogue.

The investment is going to be approximately $75 million and it is expected to happen during the next few weeks.

Source: Maximum PC


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Getac Offers Laptops for Extreme Use

Posted: May 1, 2013 @ time: 02:29PM
Author: Prunes

Do you need a laptop for field research, is it necessary for your survival that you have a laptop with you on camping, or are you just generally clumsy and need a durable laptop? If you answered "yes" to any of the questions, then Getac has got you covered. Its new X500 Rugged Server is, according to Getac, certified to military specifications for operation in extreme conditions, so it should be able to handle pretty much anything you throw at it.

The X500 Rugged Server is approximately the same size as a briefcase, which might refrain some from calling it a laptop, but everything is relative. It sports a 15.6 inch display, a Core i7 820QM, 16GB of RAM, a GeForce GT 330M, 500GB of SATA storage, three USB 2.0 ports, one USB/eSATA combo port, dual GbE LAN ports, and 802.11n WiFi. The laptop also supports up to five shock-protected hard drives that are replaceable via two quick access doors. The drives are managed by a built-in RAID controller board.

So if you have some extreme demands for your laptop, then the X500 Rugged Server might just be your thing. All you need to do is request a quote from Getac, and you should be able to buy one now.

Source: Maximum PC


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Controlled Growth of Carbon Nanotubes with Specific Chirality Achieved

Posted: May 1, 2013 @ time: 03:02PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Carbon nanotubes are funny little things as they come in so many forms with so many different properties. For example, some are great conductors of electricity while others are semiconductors, and all of this is determined by their structure. One critical characteristic of a nanotube's structure is its chirality and finally researchers at Aalto University, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS, and the Center for Electron Nanoscopy of Technical University have found a way to grow nanotubes with preferred chirality.

A simple example of chirality is handedness, as some objects twist in the right-handed direction or in the opposite, left-handed direction. Carbon nanotubes are more complicated though and require two chiral indices to be described. The researchers discovered that by reducing a solid solution in carbon monoxide they were able to form special cobalt nanoparticles to serve as a catalyst. From these catalysts the researchers were able to grow nanotubes with a 90% preference to being semiconducting and a 53% preference to having the chiral indices (6, 5), at 500 ºC. After dropping the temperature to 400 ºC, the researchers found the preferred chiral indices shifted to (7, 6) and (9, 4).

That is a lot of numbers relating to a complex topic, but what it boils down to is that the researchers have achieved something that could lead to a better understanding of how nanotubes grow. From there nanotubes with specific properties could be more easily produced, and thus used in devices and technologies.

Source: Aalto University


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The International Returns in August

Posted: May 1, 2013 @ time: 03:11PM
Author: CheeseMan42

The International, a $1 million Dota 2 tournament put on by Valve, is back for the third year in a row. Taking place in Seattle, WA from August 7-11, the tournament promises days filled with competitive Dota. Valve has announced the 13 invited teams which include a mix of Western and Chinese teams including returning champions Invictus Gaming and fan favorites like Natus Vincere and Team Liquid. Western qualifiers will take place from May 13-19 and will be hosted by The GDStudio while Eastern qualifiers will take place May 20-26 and are hosted by Beyond The Summit. The qualifiers will fill out the remaining three teams in the 16 team bracket.

Source: Valve


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Haswell May Not Play Well with All Power Supplies

Posted: May 1, 2013 @ time: 08:04PM
Author: bp9801

Intel's Haswell processors are on the way, but it appears some power supplies may have some issues getting things started. A new report shows that Haswell's C6/C7 states require 0.05 amps on the 12V2 rail, which could be a problem as some PSUs can't supply that low level power. If that's the case then it opens up a lot of stability problems or the simple fact of having a PSU shut off entirely. Intel's Reseller Center website includes a handy list of power supplies, and when you sort by a minimum 12V2 load of zero amps, there's a grand total of 23 units that meet the requirement: 19 Corsair, three InWin, and one Seasonic. There could be more that support it that aren't included on Intel's list, but chances are it won't be too many more.

However, despite all of this there is still some good news. Corsair's Robert Pearce believes motherboard manufacturers could disable the C6/C7 states in the BIOS to ensure compatibility with more PSUs. Users can always enable those states later on once their power supply supports them. Corsair is working to make sure all of its PSUs support the C6/C7 states, and hopefully other companies do too.

Source: Tech Report


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Hardware Roundup: Thursday Edition

Posted: May 2, 2013 @ time: 08:48AM
Author: bp9801

Corsair is a name known to virtually every computer enthusiast, and today we have two reviews on different spectrums of the hardware scale. There's the AX860i power supply with digital (DSP) control for voltage regulation, and the Neutron Series 256GB SSD for all your storage needs. For something entirely different altogether, there's a hands-on preview of the Oculus Rift VR headset to see what a possible future of gaming has in store. We also have a review of the Arion Urban Zen headset featuring the Samurai Song design to help set it apart from the crowd. For the RTS gamer there's a review on StarCraft II: Heart of the Swarm, the second part of Blizzard's long-awaited sequel. We also have a book written by Whoopty, an admin at XSReviews, that is now on sale after four years of work.

Video
Video Perspective: Oculus Rift Development Kit Hands-on Preview @ PC Perspective

Storage/Hard Drives
Corsair Neutron Series 256GB SSD @ [H]ardOCP

Power Supplies
Corsair AX860i 860W Power Supply @ ThinkComputers

Speakers/Headphones
Arion Urban Zen: Samurai Song @ LanOC Reviews

Gaming
StarCraft II: Heart of the Swarm @ PC Perspective

Miscellany
Whoopty wrote a book @ XSReviews


Complete Story


Gamers will Assume Leadership Structures Despite Lack of Training

Posted: May 2, 2013 @ time: 09:05AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Leadership can be an interesting topic of study, as one tries to discover the intricacies that make someone a good leader and the reason a leadership structure is needed in the first place. When it comes to survival, it makes sense that the most experienced and skilled persons would direct those less capable than they, but what about in games? That is the question researchers at Penn State sought to answer by analyzing 54,000 posts by 2500 players of an augmented reality game.

Leading up to the release of Halo 2, Microsoft created the I Love Bees game that had players decoding messages that sent them to payphones, for additional information. Naturally players communicated with each other to work together and discover the clues, and even though there was no formal leadership structure to the game, the players developed their own. Pouring over the posts at various websites and forums, the researchers made the interesting discovery that these generated leadership structures actually mimicked military leadership structures in both design and even designation. One group actually established generals to handle strategies, lieutenants to deal with specific tactics, and privates to follow orders, but none of the players were assigned their rank; they naturally selected their own.

Despite the similarities to the US military leadership structure, the researchers point out that very few of the players had any military experience to draw from. The leadership structures the players employed just spontaneously emerged from their desire to play the game most effectively.

Source: Penn State


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Noctua Updates NF-A14 Fans

Posted: May 2, 2013 @ time: 01:41PM
Author: CheeseMan42

Noctua is adding a pulse width modulation version of its popular NF-A14 series of fans. The fans have a max speed of 1500RPM, and the advanced speed control options provided by PWM give the fans an impressive feature set. Like previous models in this series, the new fan comes with Advanced Acoustic Optimization as well as Flow Acceleration Channels. CEO Mag. Roland Mossig gave the reason behind the new fan, stating that "we got many requests for a square frame PWM version for use as a case fan and on watercooling radiators. We can now meet this demand with the new NF-A14 PWM."

Source: Noctua


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Intel Introduces Iris Graphics

Posted: May 2, 2013 @ time: 01:53PM
Author: CheeseMan42

Intel has just announced Iris, the newest iteration of its built-in graphics solutions. Iris marks an upgrade over previous versions of Intel HD Graphics and is targeted at ultrabooks and similar mobile platforms. New systems that combine Iris with fourth generation Intel Core processors will see 3D graphics performance increases of two to three times, depending on processor model. In addition to improved graphics performance, Iris will also offer improvements in video and photo editing as well as providing the ability to display at 4k Ultra HD resolutions.

Source: Intel


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Creating Touch-Based Interfaces On-Demand

Posted: May 2, 2013 @ time: 07:24PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

For decades science fiction has told us that the future will be filled with touch-based interfaces, and while in some cases that is true today, it is still limited to specialized devices. For that fantastic vision to be realized, projector, sensor, and computing technologies will have to be combined and intelligently designed to respond to a variety of inputs. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have brought that combination a little closer with the creation of WorldKit; a system to generate interfaces on the fly.

To create a smart room essentially requires a projector and a depth sensor, such as the Microsoft Kinect. WorldKit is the software to use with this hardware in order to interact with them and other devices. Instead of requiring an interface to have been created beforehand, WorldKit allows a user to paint an area they wish to use as a controller, and select what it controls from a menu. Using the data from the depth sensor, the software is also able to compensate for the curvature of objects in the room and warp the projections so they appear flat on a surface. This also allows the system to work with a standard coordinate system.

Next the researchers want to improve WorldKit to allow users to interact with interfaces floating in free-space, instead of just on the surfaces of objects. They see many applications for this technology, especially as devices become so advanced that we may see interactive light bulbs, that combine all of the hardware into a single unit.

 

 

Source: Carnegie Mellon University


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Intel has a New CEO as Current COO Takes Over on May 16

Posted: May 2, 2013 @ time: 07:26PM
Author: bp9801

Intel CEO Paul Otellini's retirement from the company has been known since last November, but it wasn't clear who would suceed him. He planned to retire this May, and since we're now a couple of days in, we finally know who is next in line. Intel announced that current Chief Operating Officier (COO) Brian Krzanich will assume the CEO title on May 16, during the company's annual stockholders' meeting. Krzanich has been with Intel for 31 years, so he's the perfect internal candidate for the job. The company also announced Renée James was elected president of the board of directors, and she'll begin her new role on May 16, too. Both executives are looking forward to their new roles, with Krzanich particularly looking forward to moving Intel faster into "ultra mobility."

Source: Engadget


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Hardware Roundup: Friday Edition

Posted: May 3, 2013 @ time: 08:41AM
Author: bp9801

If you're in the market for a new video card, we have two reviews you should check out. They cover complete opposite ends of the price spectrum however, with the XFX R7790 Black Edition at the low and the ZOTAC GTX Titan AMP! Edition at the extreme high. If you just need a new keyboard and want to step into the mechanical realm, then there's the Tt eSPORTS MEKA G1 Illuminated. It has all the same features as the original MEKA G1, but this time with LED backlit keys. The media player crowd is also covered, as we have a review on the ASUS CUBE Google TV Media Streamer. This new take on the Google TV platform also includes access to 50GB of cloud storage through ASUS, so it could be just what your living room needs. We also have a new podcast covering a variety of topics for your listening pleasure.

Video Cards
XFX R7790 Black Edition 1GB @ Neoseeker
ZOTAC GTX Titan AMP! Edition @ Bjorn3D

Keyboards/Mice
Tt eSPORTS MEKA G1 Illuminated Gaming Keyboard @ ThinkComputers

Media Players
ASUS CUBE Google TV Media Streamer @ Benchmark Reviews

Miscellany
Podcast #249 @ PC Perspective


Complete Story


Studying how Gravity Affects Antimatter

Posted: May 3, 2013 @ time: 09:18AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

They say opposites attract, and electromagnetically, this is true, but what about gravitationally? For many years, researchers have been wondering if antimatter, the electromagnetic opposite of normal matter, falls up or down in a gravitational field. Now researchers at Berkeley Lab are examining their data for 434 anti-hydrogen atoms to answers the question.

Antimatter is a source of many questions concerning the entire Universe as theoretically the Big Bang that produced all normal matter should have produced equal parts antimatter. Obviously this is not the case because normal matter remains today. Since realizing this inconsistency, researchers have been trying to find all the differences between antimatter and normal matter, including the direction the particles move in a gravitational field. Watching atoms fall is not easy though, but the Berkeley Lab researchers realized they could use the magnetic traps holding the anti-atoms to make some measurements. Within a magnetic trap, magnetic fields will counteract gravity and hold the particles up, but once the fields are switched off, they will be free to move, and they can be detected when they strike the walls of the trap.

While this approach is very promising, the data was not very revealing. All it really demonstrated was that this approach could work, but the equipment and experiment needs some upgrades before the uncertainty is small enough to know for certain.

Source: Berkeley Lab


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US Scientists Build Smallest Flying Robot

Posted: May 3, 2013 @ time: 03:00PM
Author: EuroFight

Scientists at Havard University have built the smallest robot capable of flying, named the 'robo-fly'. The device weighs less than a gram, and employs insect-like 'wings' to fly, instead of conventional rotors or propellors. The construction is mainly carbon fiber, and uses piezoelectric material contracting around 120 times a second to power the 'wings'.

The robot's designers suggest that the robot may eventually have applications in rescue operations, for example locating surviors in cramped spaces, although it was not initially designed for this purpose. At the current stage of development, the robo-fly requires an external power source, however scientists are working on incorporating a small internal power source instead of using the external supply.

Source: BBC News


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Barnes and Noble Adds Google Play Store Access to Nook HD and HD+

Posted: May 3, 2013 @ time: 10:05PM
Author: bp9801

Good news for anyone with or looking to get a Barnes and Noble Nook HD or HD+ e-reader, as the company announced both devices now have access to the Google Play store. Before the two could only access Nook Apps, which were separate from regular Android apps, despite the use of a heavily modified version of Android 4.0. Now, however, the Nook HD and HD+ are more akin to other Android tablets, as well as moving ahead of the Amazon Kindle Fire and Fire HD. The update for the Nook HD and HD+ should have arrived earlier today over WiFi, so be sure to connect to an available network if you haven't received the update prompt. Once installed, you can browse more than 700,000 apps to get whatever you desire on your Nook HD or HD+, plus more music, movies, and TV shows.

Source: Business Wire


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UK University Plans 5G Research Center

Posted: May 3, 2013 @ time: 11:44PM
Author: EuroFight

Although we have only recently begun to see 4G mobile networks being rolled out, one UK university is already looking into the development of 5G . The University of Surrey has put in plans for a £35 million (~ $55 million) '5G Innovation Center' where it hopes to develop 5G mobile technology. The university also plans to install lamppost-based stations to be used to test any future technologies on a small-scale network.

The venture is being funded jointly by mobile and infrastructure providers, as well as the UK Research Partnership Investment Fund. Surrey University's professor of mobile wireless communications, Rahim Tafozolli, believes that 5G networks could be rolled out as early as 2020. As of yet, there is no defined standard for 5G communications, but with work from this research centre, and others around the world, it is hoped that the search for 5G connectivity will soon begin.

Source: BBC News


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Corsair Unveils Drive Cloning Kit and SSD Toolbox

Posted: May 4, 2013 @ time: 01:04PM
Author: bp9801

Corsair, one of the leading manufacturers of all things computer-related, has recently announced two new products for those looking for solid-state drives. The first is an HDD and SSD Cloning Kit, which allows for quick and easy transfers for anyone upgrading from a traditional hard drive to an SSD. The new SSD is connected via a USB cable, then the user selects the source and destination drives, and presses a button. All the data is transfered over with no fuss. The cable supports USB 3.0 and 2.0, with transfers speeds up to 180MB/s on the former. The Cloning Kit also supports 2.5" hard drives, and works with Windows XP on up or OS X 9.2/10.2 and above. It's available now for $24.99 and includes a three-year warranty.

The other new product is a piece of software called the SSD Toolbox. This is designed for users to install, configure, and optimize their new Corsair SSDs, as well as monitor the drive's health. It allows for the firmware to be updated, allocate space to prolong life and improve performance, display SMART status, securely wipe the drive, and more, plus a future update will enable cloning of the SSD. The software only works on Windows computers and is available as a free download from the Downloads tab of any Corsair SSD product page.


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OCC Week in Review: April 29 - May 3

Posted: May 4, 2013 @ time: 05:02PM
Author: bp9801

Over the past week or so we've had a look at another AMD HD 7790 video card, this time the Sapphire Radeon HD 7790 2GB OC. Unlike past models with only 1GB of VRAM, Sapphire doubled it to help out with more eye candy in games. We also had a look at the AVATAR Mercury Ultrabook AVIU-145A2, which proved to be a very solid laptop from a relatively unknown company outside Latin America. There's even a USB Auto Update Guide that should help make your life a little easier when plugging in a USB drive to your PC.

On the news side, Techland, developer of the Dead Island series, took the wraps off its new game called Hellraid. This game, previously known as Project Hell, is a "first-person co-op slasher" in a dark fantasy world. It features everything from melee to ranged weapons, plus magical attacks, and allows for up to four players to join up in co-op. No release date is known, but it's definitely looking like a unique and challenging game. Rockstar also released the newest trailer for Grand Theft Auto V, although it's really more three trailers presented as one. Each part focuses on one of the main characters (Michael, Franklin, and Trevor) to give a background as to who these guys are and what makes them tick. GTA V is also looking pretty great too, so the trailer is definitely worth a watch.

AMD has two new Piledriver processors on the way: the FX-4350 and FX-6350. Each one offers a little speed boost and bigger L3 cache, while keeping prices low. Samsung is rumored to be creating four different tablets in sizes ranging from 7" to 11", including the Nexus 11 with an eight core CPU. That'd make it the first ever tablet with eight cores powering it, but we'll have to see what comes of any of them. For a bigger picture, literally, LG showed off a curved OLED TV packing a 55" screen. It's designed to deliver an IMAX-quality experience in your living room, but currently availability is limited to just Korea.

Corsair was supposedly up for sale, but that proved to be highly inaccurate. Instead the company is looking for an investor to help it acquire more companies to help boost Corsair's market share. The upcoming Haswell line of processors from Intel may present a problem for people with certain power supplies, as it supposedly needs a mere 0.05 amps on the 12V2 rail in the C6/C7 states. There aren't a lot of PSUs that can deliver that low amount of power, so we'll just have to see what happens. Also on the Intel side, the company has shown off its latest Iris integrated graphics, which delivers two to three times the performance of past generations and even provides support for 4K resolutions. Intel also found a new CEO in Brian Krzanich, who'll take over for Paul Otellini on May 16.

For some science news, a group of nanophysicists at IBM created a movie consisting entirely of carbon monoxide molecules. The movie is pretty fascinating to see, especially given its stop motion animation. Scientists at North Carolina State University were able to create a new type of ultraviolet laser using zinc oxide by fixing a stability issue in a rather novel fashion. Another group, this time at Carnegie Mellon University, managed to create touch-based interfaces on demand, by way of WorldKit. It basically makes a smart room where any surface can now be used as a controller. Eventually the team wants to allow for interfaces floating in the air, which would further bridge the gap between science fiction and science fact once realized.


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Cooler Master Wants to Take You to School

Posted: May 5, 2013 @ time: 05:59AM
Author: CheeseMan42

Cooler Master has announced a new website aimed at informing customers about their products, Cooler Master University. The first guide takes a look at the variety of Cherry MX switches available in mechanical keyboards. Future topics include gaming surfaces and mouse grip styles. Senior Product Marketing Manager Bryant Nguyen said, “We’re committed to educating new users and enthusiasts to better understand how the technologies implemented by Cooler Master can augment their computer experience.”

Source: Cooler Master


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Enermax Announces COENUS Case Line

Posted: May 5, 2013 @ time: 06:09AM
Author: CheeseMan42

Enermax has a new entry into the mid tower gaming chassis market with the COENUS line. Users are first greeted with a case that has a large amount of mesh exterior, providing for improved ventilation, and a side window exposing the innards for all to see. The case can support up to eight 3.5" or 2.5" hard drives in a variety of configurations with drive rails providing for easy installation. Up to three dual slot video cards can also be accommodated based on the chosen hard drive configuration. The COENUS ECA3290A-G is available now with an MSRP of $69.99.


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Steam Greenlight Spotlight: Flowstorm

Posted: May 5, 2013 @ time: 12:59PM
Author: ClayMeow

Flowstorm is a top-down 2.5D racing and aerial combat game created with the Unity 3D engine. I suck at it. To call the game unforgiving would be an understatement – more like sadistic. You control a rocket ship through various levels, but if any part of the ship other than the armored underside touches a wall, you shatter. We're not talking high speed collisions here; you can be going as slow as possible, just lightly scrape the side of the rocket against the wall, and BOOM! It's a good thing the death animations are beautifully done, slightly soothing the pain of dying over and over.

The controls are simple to use yet hard to master. I know that sounds cliché, but it really applies here. W or Up Arrow accelerates, while A or Left Arrow and D or Right Arrow turn you left and right, respectively. When the game mode permits it, pressing Shift or Spacebar fires a grenade – its length of travel and arc depends on how long you hold down the key. Pressing R, Tab, or Return respawns you; you'll be using that a lot. The game also supports a gamepad, though I think that would make it even thougher to control. No matter what your preferred control method is, your rocket is affected by gravity, firmly planting Flowstorm in the Thrust-clone sub-genre.

Flowstorm sets itself apart from other Thrust-clones with its unique sliding mechanic. As I mentioned earlier, your underside is armored. With careful manipulation – and maybe a bit of luck – you can use the underside of your rocket to slide across surfaces and keep momentum through turns. It's an interesting mechanic that can be quite useful in the racing levels, though probably not so much in aerial combat. It also happens to be essential in one of the six "game modes" you can partake in.

The reason I put "game modes" in quotes is because Flowstorm handles them in a rather unique way: each level features all six modes...at once. Let me explain. It's probably more apt to call them "styles of play" rather than game modes. When you select a level, you will see six leaderboards, each representing a different style of play. The most basic leaderboard is titled Racers, which is simply finishing the level as fast as possible. Environmentalists tasks you with finishing while using as little fuel as possible (this is where the sliding would be essential, as it conserves fuel), Accelerators is finishing as fast as possible under constant acceleration, Counterclockers requires finishing the level without turning right, Clockers requires finishing the level without turning left, and finally Untouchables is finishing the level without touching the ground. This is a great way of doing things because it takes out the tedious step of choosing a game mode – the game handles that for you. Release the accelerate key and the Accelerators time disappears. Touch the ground and Untouchables disappears. It's a very novel system and absolutely perfect for a game where you frequently die.

Such a system also lends itself well to level creation as the map creator doesn't have to worry about choosing which game mode(s) to allow. And yes, that was a subtle hint at another great feature of Flowstorm – it comes with a level editor! Though I did not get to test out the level editor – it's only available in the standalone version of the game and not the free-to-play web version that I tried – based on the videos, it looks quite easy and intuitive to use. If you have any experience using the Pen Tool in Adobe Illustrator or Photoshop, or the Curve Tools in 3D modeling programs like Maya, you'll be right at home in Flowstorm's level editor. In fact, it may actually be easier than those aforementioned tools, as you can easily add and remove points, divide segments in half, and toggle linearity (lines vs. curves). After you lay out a path, you can set the spawn point and place checkpoints and various props to bring the level to life.

As I mentioned above, there is a free-to-play web version that's currently available at the official Flowstorm site. It's classified as Alpha 4.0, so don't expect perfection or a complete game, but it's certainly very playable. It features five racing levels, three racing levels with targets you have to destroy, and one local 1v1 combat level. You can register for free to have the game save your scores, as well as provide you with stats. The standalone version supports PC, Mac, and Linux. Though I'm a bit late for the Kickstarter (it ended unsuccessfully on Thursday), Swedish developer Neat Corporation (the duo of Jenny "Sranine" Nordenborg and Joachim "Acegikmo" Holmér) is continuing development. Multiple rockets are planned, each with unique properties (two are in the game right now, though the fatter Rooket doesn't have crash animations, so it's not as satisfying to play), as well as a 2v2 multiplayer mode where you kill opponents to steal energy cores that you then have to bring to your base. So go vote YES on Greenlight – don't blame them if you suck at the game like I do.

Previous Spotlight: DreadOut. Favorite the OCC Steam Greenlight Spotlight Collection. And don't forget to visit the forum thread.


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AMD Announces New Semi-Custom Processor Division

Posted: May 5, 2013 @ time: 01:53PM
Author: EuroFight

AMD has launched a new division which aims allow companies to design their own processors for specific applications using the basis of AMD's existing APU technology, while incorporating the company's own intellectual property. This has already been applied in the upcoming Playstation 4, which utilises a heavily modified APU based on the Jaguar core, but until now, there has not been a dedicated division for custom chips. It is hoped that the advent of this new division will help generate the profit that AMD so greatly needs.

One example of the application of this new initiative would be use in Smart TVs, where the APU could contain hardware-accelerated decoders for specific video file types. Interestingly, the new division could enable AMD to incorporate ARM cores into its existing APUs, which may eventually open doors for AMD to enter the ARM SoC market. This could then lead to more powerful graphical rendering capabilities on smaller ARM-based devices such as smartphones and tablets.

Source: AMD


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Scientists Develop Digital Camera Based on Insect Eyes

Posted: May 6, 2013 @ time: 03:56AM
Author: EuroFight

Scientists at the University of Illinois have developed a digital camera that functions in a similar way to an insect's eye. The prototype camera has 180 small lenses embedded in a curved mount, which enables it to capture high resolution panoramic photos with a continuous depth-of-field. The camera is made by inflating a flat layer of lenses into a hemispherical eye-shape, similar to eyes found in insects. This technology has a wide variety of possible applications, and could eventually be used in anything from surveillance systems to UAVs.

Each lens focusses light onto a photosensitive silicon layer, which is then built up with images from the other lenses to form a representation of the objects around the camera. The viewing angle of the lens is around 160 degrees, however the prototype camera has a relatively low resolution. John Rogers, a material scientist at the university, says that with the basic designs his team have developed, they can now work on increasing the resolution by adding more and more lenses to the camera.

Source: NPG


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Hardware Roundup: Monday Edition

Posted: May 6, 2013 @ time: 08:43AM
Author: bp9801

We have a little bit of everything for you to start your week with, including another look at the XFX Radeon HD 7790 Black Edition 1GB video card. Logitech recently reinvented its gaming line with new technology and materials, and luckily there's a review on the G500s gaming mouse to see all the improvements. For the photography crowd, we have a look at an SLR sling backpack from Caselogic that could keep it safe while traveling. If you need new speakers, then perhaps the Ineo AlienVibes W601 system could fit the bill. For something a little different, we have the top five Google Chrome extensions to help with productivity, as well as nine alternatives to Skype for VoIP and voice chat.

Video Cards
XFX Radeon HD 7790 Black Edition 1GB @ Madshrimps

Keyboards/Mice
Logitech G500s @ LanOC Reviews

Speakers/Headphones
Ineo AlienVibes W601 Speaker System @ Benchmark Reviews

Miscellany
Caselogic SLR Sling Camera Backpack @ ThinkComputers
Top 5 Google Chrome Productivity Extensions @ ThinkComputers
9 Alternatives To Skype For VoIP And Voice Chat @ ThinkComputers


Complete Story


Complex Nanowires Spontaneously Grown on Graphene

Posted: May 6, 2013 @ time: 09:08AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

The technology of the future may be quite different from what we are use to today, with the ongoing development of many materials with new and special properties. Among them are nanowires which can have their electrical characteristics determined by controlling what they are made of and their design. Researchers at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign have recently discovered the spontaneous growth of nanowires with differing cores and outer shells.

There are a few ways to grow nanowires and all of them require a substrate for the wires to grow off of. Typically silicon is used for this, but the researchers decided to use graphene, a single-atom thick sheet of carbon, because it is cheaper, flexible, and less of it is needed. Graphene has been used as a substrate for growing nanowires previously, but this experiment differed from those as the nanowires were to be made of indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs); three elements instead of just two. To the researchers' surprise, the elements did not form solid InGaAs nanowires but an InAs core with an InGaAs shell surrounding it. This structure is desired for different applications and usually takes multiple steps, but here it was achieved in one.

Though the researchers did not expect this result, upon further examination they realized what happened. The distance between atoms in a crystal of InAs is roughly the same as a distance within graphene, so the InAs molecules fell into place, while the InGaAs molecules surrounded them.

Source: University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign


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3DMark Gets an Update

Posted: May 6, 2013 @ time: 03:12PM
Author: CheeseMan42

Futuremark has released an update for the latest version of the popular benchmarking software 3DMark. The software will now be compatible with systems that have up to four GPUs. The company had hoped to have the fix out much sooner but it turned out to be more than a simple driver issue. Also added in v1.1 is the Ice Storm Extreme benchmark, a more intensive test for mobile devices including tablets and ultrabooks.


Complete Story


Skin Cells Transformed Into Neurons Without Pluripotent Stem Cell Stage

Posted: May 6, 2013 @ time: 04:28PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

One of the hot topics in medical science today is the use of pluripotent stem cells to repair tissue damage that is otherwise untreatable. That however is something of a silver lining, and there is definitely a cloud that goes with it, such as the risk of stem cells developing into unintended cell types or even becoming cancerous. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin, Madison however have successfully convert adult, skin stem cells into neural progenitors, skipping the pluripotent stem cell stage, and thus the risks associated with it.

After harvesting the skin cells, the researchers treated them with a modified form of the Sendai virus, a type of cold virus. This virus has not been used for this purpose before, but does offer some advantages over those that are used, such as not entering the cell's DNA and it can be killed by heat within a day. Once the cells had their genes changed so they could become neural progenitors, the researchers heated the sample enough to kill the virus and waited thirteen days before harvesting the progenitor cells. These cells actually are a kind of stem cell but are not pluripotent, as they are only able to develop into any of the three major types of neural cells. After implantation into newborn mice, the cells grew normally and showed no sign of defects or tumors.

Currently this research is just proof-of-concept with more work to do, but it is certainly promising work. Potentially we could see neural progenitors created from the skin of ALS patients and other diseases to treat if not cure them.

Source: University of Wisconsin, Madison


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Adobe Rebrands Creative Suite as Creative Cloud; Unveils Two Tablet-Specific Items

Posted: May 6, 2013 @ time: 06:50PM
Author: bp9801

Adobe took the wraps off some new gear earlier today, although one of them should be pretty familiar for most users. The company announced its Creative Suite is being rebranded into Creative Cloud, which was first introduced last year as a subscription-based model for the Adobe product stack. What it means is users have access all of Adobe's tool, with the latest updates, for a monthly fee. Everything is stored and synced online, so your settings are never far away whether you're on a desktop, laptop, or mobile device. It also allows for greater interaction with other Creative Cloud users to get feedback on whatever you're making. All the Creative Cloud products are receiving a plethora of new features, and even adding some from Photoshop Extended to Photoshop CC, like 3D editing and conditional actions.

However, the only downside is Creative Suite 6 is the last of the line for the CS products. Those are still going to be available and Adobe plans to support them, including releasing bug fixes when needed, just CS6 is giving way to CC. The monthly subscription for Adobe Creative Cloud should still be $49.99, while current owners of CS3 or higher can drop that to $29.99.

The other new stuff Adobe showed off today is for the mobile crowd, specifially tablet owners. Neither one is ready for the primetime and could have a name change when available, but the two are known as Project Mighty and Project Napoleon. Project Mighty is a stylus that pulls information from your Creative Cloud settings in a way to lessen the divide between software and hardware. It offers various pressure sensitivity levels (exact ones unknown), and has a rechargeable battery, Bluetooth, and built-in memory. Project Napoleon, on the other hand, is a high-tech straight edge, as it projects straight lines to help keep things even when drawing on a tablet. Information is a little light on both so far, but you can check them out at the source below.

Sources: Adobe Creative Cloud and Adobe Projects Mighty and Napoleon


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The Sims 4 Officially Announced - Fully Offline Experience

Posted: May 6, 2013 @ time: 07:58PM
Author: ClayMeow

Earlier today, Maxis and EA officially announced that The Sims 4 is currently in development for PC and Mac. Expected for a 2014 release, perhaps the most interesting aspect of the announcement was EA's choice of words in describing the game – a "single-player offline experience." I think it's a safe bet to say that those words were carefully chosen as a result of the SimCity "always-on" debacle.

Has EA learned its lesson? Still too soon to tell, but it's a good sign. That news will surely please the millions upon millions of The Sims fans.

 

Source: Electronic Arts


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Hardware Roundup: Tuesday Edition

Posted: May 7, 2013 @ time: 08:27AM
Author: bp9801

ROCCAT is a name many know for computer peripherals, like its new Kone XTD mouse (seen here at OCC). This is the company's new flagship mouse, so check out the review to see how well it performs. We have a look at how the AMD Radeon HD 7990 stacks up with an NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN. It's a comparison of the two top-of-the-line video cards on the market today, and it'll be very interesting to see how the dual GPU HD 7990 compares to the single GPU GTX TITAN. There's also a review on a Toshiba 3TB hard drive for those needing a lot of storage, as well as a look at the Intel Silvermont architecture for Atom processors in smartphones and tablets.

CPUs
Intel Silvermont Architecture Updates Atom for Phones and Tablets @ PC Perspective

Video Cards
Radeon HD 7990 versus GeForce GTX TITAN @ [H]ardOCP

Keyboards/Mice
ROCCAT Kone XTD Gaming Mouse @ ThinkComputers

Hard Drives
Toshiba DT01ACA300 3TB Hard Disk Drive @ Madshrimps


Complete Story


Printable Invisibility Cloak Created

Posted: May 7, 2013 @ time: 08:59AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Invisibility has been a special power in numerous stories from multiple cultures over uncountable years, but only recently has technology caught up to fantasy and brought it within reach. Since the first microwave cloak was created at Duke University, researchers have been working to design cloaks that operate in visible light and that use different materials and methods of cloaking. Now Duke Researchers have returned to creating a microwave invisibility cloak that has the unique property of having been printed by a 3D printer.

Three dimensional printers are special devices that are able to construct objects out of polymers, layer by layer, following instructions from a computer. Potentially these devices could be made cheap enough to enter households and there produce all manner of objects, including invisibility cloaks. When the researchers printed theirs it took from three to seven hours to create the device with special holes meant to deflect microwave beams. Advanced algorithms are used to determine where these holes are to be placed, along with their size and shape in order to affect the microwaves as desired.

Though the current cloak design is relatively small, the researchers believe larger versions could be created. They are also confident that visible-light cloaks could one day be printed.

Source: Duke Engineering


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Xbox 720 Might Not Need Always-on Connection After All

Posted: May 7, 2013 @ time: 10:06AM
Author: Prunes

Good news for those who seek to buy the new Xbox 720, since it will not require an always-on connection as was previously rumored. It is supposedly not necessary to have a connection when playing games, watching Blu-ray movies, and streaming live television. It is still a rumor, but the information is said to be originating from an email that was sent to all full time members of the Xbox 720 team.

What is interesting is that Microsoft will implement Blu-ray support, since it originally betted its money on HD-DVD with the Xbox 360. Instead of developing a new type of high-capacity disc standard like Nintendo did with Wii U, Microsoft has chosen to adopt the competitor's standard. That decision is probably slightly forced due to the widespread use of Blu-rays, and because it allows the Xbox 720 to be used as an HTPC, when combined with the new cable television packages offered through Microsoft's new partners Comcast and Verizon.

Official details about the Xbox 720 will be revealed May 21, when Microsoft will uncover all the mysteries about the console. 

Source: ExtremeTech


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Intel Announces New Generation of Atom Processors

Posted: May 7, 2013 @ time: 11:29AM
Author: Prunes

Intel has announced its new Silvermont architecture, which is going to improve the Atom line significantly. The new architecture will be based on Intel's 22 nm 3D Tri-Gate SoC, which is faster while using less power than the current generation. Intel claims that Silvermont will deliver up to three times more peak performance or about the same performance as the current generation using only 20% of the power. The new architecture allows for a new out-of-order execution engine, a multi-core and system fabric architecture that is scalable up to eight cores, new IA instructions, and improved power management capabilities, such as low power C states.

Intel foresees that these chips will be used in various applications, such as smartphones, microservers, tablets, entry level laptops, and network infrastructure. Release dates of some of the CPUs based on Silvermont have been announced:

  • Baytrail: Quad-core processor for tablets - holiday 2013
  • Merrifield: Smartphone processor - by the end of 2013
  • Avoton: Microserver chip - second half of 2013
  • Rangeley: Routers and other networking gear - second half of 2013

The success of these chips are crucial for how well Intel will do in the growing mobile market. ARM has been dominating the market for quite a while, and other competitors are trying to get their market share as well. Intel needs to get some results soon, if it wants to have a say in the future of mobile computing.

Source: MaximumPC


Complete Story


Virtual Creatures Evolve their Own Gait

Posted: May 7, 2013 @ time: 12:30PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

One of the special characteristics that distinguishes humanity from many other animals is our bipedal, upright gait. Our method of locomotion has evolved over millions of years, as have those methods other animals use, and many of these are now being studied very carefully for use in robots. Researchers at Cornell University however decided to approach walking a little differently by applying evolutionary algorithms on virtual robots to develop their gait or gallop.

Evolutionary algorithms work by mimicking natural evolution with mutations being introduced and the most successful systems being allowed to reproduce. In this case, being the most successful meant being the fastest. After 1000 generations, the robots proved to be unique looking with an interesting variety of mechanical solutions. Possibly with more generations the designs will be more similar to what we can find around us, as Nature has had the benefit of many times more generations.

The paper by the researchers concerning these robots can be freely downloaded: Unshackling Evolution: Evolving Soft Robots With Multiple Materials and a Powerful Generative Encoding (PDF).

 

 

Source: Cornell University (via EurekAlert!)


Complete Story


Wolfenstein: The New Order Announced, Due End of this Year

Posted: May 7, 2013 @ time: 12:41PM
Author: bp9801

Bethesda teased a new project yesterday, and now we know exactly what the company is up to. Wolfenstein: The New Order has officially been announced, with developer MachineGames at the helm. This isn't the Wolfenstein you're familiar with however, as it's set in 1960 after the Nazis won World War II. That's right, in The New Order the Nazis became the dominant power, and it's up to series hero B.J. Blazkowicz to launch an "impossible counter-offensive." The game is set in Europe and tasks you with infiltrating various Nazi strongholds, facing off against a multitude of enemies, and even using some "super weapons" the Nazis have used to control Earth "and beyond." The announcement trailer is available below that you should really check out.

Wolfenstein: The New Order is due to arrive on PC, PS3, Xbox 360, and next-generation consoles at the end of this year. Developer MachineGames is composed of the original founders of Starbreeze Studios before, who left in 2009. Zenimax, parent company of Bethesda, then acquired MachineGames in 2010.

Source: GameSpot


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NZXT Announces H630 Chassis

Posted: May 7, 2013 @ time: 02:59PM
Author: CheeseMan42

The H630 case from NZXT was created with the goal of providing a fully featured case that manages to remain extremely quiet. The near silence is provided through the use of high-density sound dampening material that doesn't compromise the ability to include several high airflow fans. The H630 also gives users the ability to mount liquid cooling radiators up to 360mm in size in either the front or top of the case. The H630 will be available soon in Matte Black and Glossy White at an MSRP of $149.99.


Complete Story


Deepcool Reveals Multi Core X8 Notebook Cooler

Posted: May 7, 2013 @ time: 03:08PM
Author: CheeseMan42

The Multi Core X8 is a new notebook cooler from Deepcool that is highlighted by the inclusion of four 100mm fans. Each fan is separated into a different zone, targeting a different section of the notebook. The fans blow over aluminum fins to help dissipate the heat more effectively. A fan control knob allows users to customize which fans are on at a given time.


Complete Story


Seagate Announces New Solid State Drives

Posted: May 7, 2013 @ time: 11:00PM
Author: Prunes

Seagate, one of the world's largest hard drive manufacturers, has announced a new line of products. The Seagate 600 Series is the company’s first client-based solid state drives. The solid state drives will be sold in three different capacities - 120 GB, 240 GB, and 480 GB. Performance differs depending on the size:

  • 120GB: 500+MB/s read, 300+MB/s write, up to 80,000 IOPS read, up to 60,000 IOPS write
  • 240GB: 500+MB/s read, 400+MB/s write, up to 80,000 IOPS read, up to 70,000 IOPS write
  • 480GB: 500+MB/s read, 400+MB/s write, up to 80,000 IOPS read, up to 70,000 IOPS write

Seagate has not disclosed what controller is being used, but some reviews suggest that it is based on Link A Media Device's LM87800 controller, which is also found in Corsair's Neutron and Neutron GTX.

A low power version will be available as well, called the 600 Pro Series. It is intended for low power server and storage solutions, such as cloud systems, hyperscale data centers, and virtualized environments. It has a typical power consumption of 2.8 W. Seagate has also announced the 1200 Series. These drives will feature dual-port 12 Gbps SAS connectors, and they are said to be twice as fast as previous generation drives. They come in capacities up to 800 GB.

Prices and availability has not been disclosed yet.

Source: MaximumPC


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Wednesday Edition

Posted: May 8, 2013 @ time: 08:38AM
Author: bp9801

Today we have a lot of items to enhance your computing experience, as well as something to help you run more hardware. Cooler Master has a new series of power supplies to fit pretty much any need, and today we have a look at the V1000, which provides 1000 watts of pure power. It's a pure modular power supply, so you only need to connect the cables you need instead of having to hide a big nest of them. For anyone needing a portable hard drive, we have a review of the Silicon Power Armor A80, which packs a 1TB hard drive into a rugged design. Moving on we have the AlienVibes W601 speakers from Ineo to help get you some better sounds. Lastly there's a look at a fan controller from Fractal Design that has six channels with 36 watts of power each.

Power Supplies
Cooler Master V1000 @ LanOC Reviews

Speakers/Headphones
Ineo AlienVibes W601 Speaker System @ ThinkComputers

Storage/Hard Drives
Silicon Power Armor A80 1TB USB 3.0 Portable Drive @ Bjorn3D

Cooling
Fractal Design Adjust 108 Fan Controller @ Benchmark Reviews


Complete Story


Researchers Find what gets Followers on Twitter

Posted: May 8, 2013 @ time: 09:13AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

At times it can be weird not having a Twitter account, because it means next to nothing to me if someone gets a new follower or loses one. I do recognize that this is important to many Twitter users though, as do others, such as the researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology who performed a first-of-its-kind longitudinal study on what gets you more follows.

To perform this study the researchers examined half a million tweets over 15 months and identified 2800 positive and negative terms, in order to label whether a tweet's content is positive or negative. After crunching all of the numbers the researchers found that people do not like it when you talk about yourself and are more likely to follow you if you post information, like a news item. Tweets should also be about positive, happy things, like how to grow your social network, instead of unemployment, illness, and death. Also, as useful as hashtags can be to show your support for something, they can be a turn off when abused, causing less people to follow you.

With this research finally done, we may start to see technologists utilize it to create tools to help grow their audiences. If you are interested in following the latest news from us, you can check out the RSS Feed link at the top of the page, below the Featured Articles.

Source: Georgia Institute of Technology


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Cooler Master Releases New Laptop Stand

Posted: May 8, 2013 @ time: 02:45PM
Author: CheeseMan42

The NotePal ErgoStand II is a new laptop stand and cooler from Cooler Master that was designed with ergonomics in mind. The stand has five different viewing and typing angles to provide comfort when using a laptop for an extended period of time. A 140mm fan provides strong cooling potential while keeping noise to a minimum. Up to four USB 2.0 devices can be plugged into the included ports, and laptops up to 17" in size can be accommodated.


Complete Story


Thermaltake Releases Soft Laptop Cooler

Posted: May 8, 2013 @ time: 03:02PM
Author: CheeseMan42

Thermaltake has announced a new laptop cooler designed with consideration for comfort. The LifeCool Series features a padded cooler that will give users a soft cushion to relieve any pressure that other coolers might apply. Heat dissipation is provided by the aluminum surface, and laptops up to 17" in size are compatible. The LifeCool Series is available in eight colors including white, red, and orange.


Complete Story


Like Wine, Programmers Improve with Age

Posted: May 8, 2013 @ time: 04:48PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

As captured by Moore's Law, the rate of technological developments follows an exponential growth pattern, with one advance leading to many. This means that one year's development is also faster than the previous, which may make it hard for some to keep up, at least in theory. Researchers at North Carolina State University decided to test if older programmers have a hard time keeping up with new technologies, compared to younger developers, and found that increasing years comes with increasing skills.

Using over 80,000 profiles of programmers at StackOverflow, the researchers assessed the knowledge of individual programmers by their rating. At StackOverflow, users are able to ask and answer questions, and they are also rated by the quality of their answers and questions. These ratings can be used to estimate a user's understanding of programming, without having to individually survey them. The researchers found that ratings consistently increased with a user's age until they were in their 40's. There was not enough information to determine anything past that age.

The researchers also considered the number of subjects the programmers were commenting on and found that those in their 30's and older were considerably more knowledgeable than those between 15 and 30. Even with newer technologies that are less than ten years old, the older programmers demonstrated equal or greater knowledge. Looks like there is something to be said for experience.

Source: North Carolina State University


Complete Story


3D Magnetic Vortices Observed

Posted: May 9, 2013 @ time: 07:16AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Materials are magnetic when the electrons within them are aligned in a common direction, as each electron has its own magnetic field, and these add up to the larger field of the material. Electrons do not need to line up like that though for the material to have special magnetic properties. For the first time, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have observed a new magnetic alignment that may have interesting applications for transmitting information wirelessly.

Magnetic vortices are created when a material's electrons align in a circular path, like mini bar magnets placed end-to-end in a circle, with those in the middle pointing straight up or down. If you connect this to a DC power source, the vertical electrons will start rotating in a circle and emitting electromagnetic waves. If the speed of the DC signal is too high, those electrons will flip upside down, which impairs the ability to use them to transmit data. What the HZDR researchers found was a way to create three-dimensional vortices, which should not have this problem, at least not until higher speeds, because the electrons near the core are nearly vertical and reinforce those at the center. This prevents the flipping.

The material the researchers created is comprised of two magnetic disks, roughly 10 nm thick and 500 nm wide, with a nonmagnetic disk separating them. Potentially this tiny device could be made into an antenna capable of transmitting in the gigahertz range, where Wi-Fi networks currently operate.

Source: Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf


Complete Story


Hardware Roundup: Thursday Edition

Posted: May 9, 2013 @ time: 08:26AM
Author: bp9801

NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 650Ti Boost video card (OCC review here) is the company's latest offering, and today there's one to look at from ASUS. This isn't a typical card though, as ASUS decks it out in a DirectCU II cooler and SAP components to give a better bang for your buck. If you need some new peripherals to get your game on, then you'll be interested in the GX Gaming KMH 100 gaming kit. This kit includes a keyboard, mouse, and headset, providing everything you need in a most convenient manner. We also have a look at a 550 watt power supply from Enermax's new TriAthlor series. There's even a review on a Noreve leather case for the Sony Xperia Z smartphone to keep your new gadget safe and secure.

Video Cards
ASUS GTX 650 Ti Boost DCII @ Bjorn3D

Keyboards/Mice
GX Gaming KMH 100 Gaming Kit @ ThinkComputers

Power Supplies
Enermax TriAthlor 550W @ PC Perspective

Mobile
Noreve Sony Xperia Z Leather Case (Tradition - 21038T) @ Madshrimps


Complete Story


Cooler Master Announces V Series Power Supplies

Posted: May 9, 2013 @ time: 12:16PM
Author: bp9801

Cooler Master, one of the leading companies for many computer products, has recently announced its newest line of power supplies. Dubbed the V Series, these PSUs offer 80 Plus Gold efficiency even at low loads. Each one has a single 12V rail running the show, with the highest grade of Japanese electrolytes and solid capacitors along for the ride. A 135mm Fluid Dynamic Bearing fan ensures the components are kept cool while offering minimal noise. The V Series is fully modular with flat ribbon cables to cut down on excess clutter inside the case, which should go a long way towards helping keep system interiors clean. The PSUs also support C6/C7 states in the upcoming Intel Haswell processors, which is good to see.

Cooler Master's V Series of PSUs are available now in 700W, 850W, and 1000W models. The V700 is priced at $159.99, the V850 at $189.99, and the V1000 at $209.99.


Complete Story


PowerColor Looks for Silence with New Video Card

Posted: May 9, 2013 @ time: 02:02PM
Author: CheeseMan42

High powered video cards have included massive heatsinks with multiple fans for several years to dissipate the amount of heat produced by the powerful GPU. The newest card from PowerColor, the SCS3 HD7850, looks to diverge from the trend by including a heatsink that doesn't require fans. The G-shape heat pipe design offers the same cooling as dual U-shape heat pipes, and features several aluminum fins to assist in heat dissipation. The SCS3 features a core speed of 850MHz and 1GB of 1200MHz GDDR5.


Complete Story


NZXT Offers New Fan Controller

Posted: May 9, 2013 @ time: 02:18PM
Author: CheeseMan42

NZXT is breathing new life into the Sentry Mix line of fan controllers with the Sentry Mix 2. The Sentry Mix 2 can handle up to six fans with continuous power of 30 watts, and is compatible with a variety of fans including PWM. A matte-black finish, glossy black sliders, and LED lights round out the visual aspect of the device. The Sentry Mix 2 will be available with an MSRP of $29.99.


Complete Story


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