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CPU's Article (28)

AMD Ryzen 3 1300X & Ryzen 3 1200 Review

AMD Ryzen 3 1300X & Ryzen 3 1200 Review

» October 17, 2017 05:00PM

Intel 8th Generation Core i7 8700K & Core i5 8400 Review

Intel 8th Generation Core i7 8700K & Core i5 8400 Review

» October 4, 2017 05:00PM

Intel Core i9 7980XE & Core i9 7960X Review

Intel Core i9 7980XE & Core i9 7960X Review

» September 24, 2017 05:00PM

Intel Core i9 7900X & Core i7 7740X Review

Intel Core i9 7900X & Core i7 7740X Review

» July 25, 2017 05:00PM

AMD Ryzen 5 1600X & 1500X Processor Review

AMD Ryzen 5 1600X & 1500X Processor Review

» April 10, 2017 05:00PM


CPU's News (475)

More Speculative Execution Vulnerabilities Discovered

Category: CPU's
Posted: August 15, 2018 08:44AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Though the public revelation of the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities was many months ago, the impact is still being felt as more attack vectors on speculative execution are discovered. The latest discoveries go after the L1 cache in CPUs, and can even break into Intel's Software Guard Extensions (SGX). These L1 Terminal Fault (L1TF) vulnerabilities do not appear to affect AMD CPUs, Intel Xeon Phi processors, and older Intel chips. Also, two of the variants of L1TF vulnerabilities can also be mitigated via patches and updates released earlier this year, but the third is still an issue.

What these vulnerabilities involve is how CPUs handle virtual memory combined with speculative execution. Normally there is a page table that keeps track of the location of all items in memory, but as a lot of work is done and some pieces of data are not so needed, they will be taken out of physical memory and dumped onto a disc as virtual memory. When this happens the page table has that entry set as Not Present, and if the information is then requested, it has to be read into physical memory from the virtual memory location. With speculative execution though, this reading of the information into memory can occur earlier than the request, pulling it into memory. The vulnerability comes from an instruction trying to access an entry in the page table that has an invalid Present bit set, which then causes the information to be loaded by speculative execution, if it is in the L1 cache.

While the first two versions of the vulnerability can reportedly be mitigated by already existing patches, the third needs extra work, and current approaches can impact performance. This third involves virtualization and Intel Hyper-Threading, so it can be an issue for cloud platforms. Luckily there are no known examples of these vulnerabilities being used maliciously. Still, the security of speculative execution is continuing to be challenged. Intel has stated its next generation of Intel Xeon Scalable processors (Cascade Lake) will have the hardware-level changes necessary to address these and other issues.

The video below covers the vulnerabilities and is from Red Hat.

 

 

Source: Intel, Phoronix, and The Register



2nd Generation Threadripper Officially Announced by AMD

Category: CPU's
Posted: August 6, 2018 08:27AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

The wait is over as AMD has officially announced its 2nd Gen Ryzen Threadripper HEDT CPUs, with the first pair releasing in one week, though pre-orders start today. At the top of the stack is the 2990WX, and just as the leak last week suggested, its 32-cores/64-threads have a base clock of 3.0 GHz and a boost of 4.2 GHz. The TDP for this processor is 250 W and it is launching on August 13 at the price of $1799. Also launching this month, but at the end (August 31), is the 2950X, which is the 16-core/32-thread part and it has 3.5 GHz base and 4.4 GHz boost clocks. The TDP of this part is 180 W and its launch price is $899, which is pretty nice since the 1950X it replaces launched at $999 last year.

Also announced, though not launching until October, were the 2970WX and 2920X, which are the 24 core and 12 core processors in the new lineup. The 2970WX shares the same clocks and TDP of the 2990WX, but will only cost you $1299. The 2920X will have a base clock of 3.5 GHz, a boost of 4.3 GHz, and a 180 W TDP when it launches at $649. Based on the stated L3 cache size, it is clear the two WX parts are using all four dies the chips hold, while the X parts are only using two active dies, as the WX CPUs have 64 MB and the X CPUs have 32 MB.

All of these new CPUs will work in existing X399 motherboards, though if you plan on dropping them into a current board, you may want to be careful about trying to overclock them, or at least the WX parts with their higher RDPs. To help keep things cool, CoolerMaster created the Wraith Ripper air cooler, which was shown off at Computex. The AMD press release says it is currently available, but at the time I am writing this, I did not see it on CoolerMaster's website.

Also revealed today is that last month at a special event, overclockers pushed a 2990WX to over 5.1 GHz on LN2, which allowed it to reach a record breaking score of 7618 in Cinebench R15. The previous single-socket record was held by Intel's i9-7980XE at 5828.

Source: AMD



AMD Threadripper Specs and Prices Potentially Leaked

Category: CPU's
Posted: August 4, 2018 09:55AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

This information might be among the more anticipated for CPUs this year, especially if it is accurate. VideoCardz has revealed leaked specifications and prices for the upcoming 2nd generation AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors, including the new 24-core/48-thread and 32-core/64-thread parts and the 12-core/24-thread and 16-core/32-thread upgrades to the already available CPUs. If this information is accurate, the current top-of-the-line Threadripper 1950X (which I am a proud owner of) that launched at $999 will be replaced in core count by the 2950X at $899 while the 2990WX, the massive 32 core part will take the top spot at a price of $1799. The 2970WX and 2920X, which are the 24 core and 12 core parts respectively, will cost $1249 and $649, respectively. A closer look at those prices though and you will notice doubling the cores here is doubling the price as well. It may also be worth noting that a replacement for the 1900X, an 8-core/16-thread 'entry-level' Threadripper is not mentioned. However, its launch price of $549 is not far from that of the 2920X ($649) so the intent might be for the 2920X to serve as the 'entry level' part, for those wanting the 64 PCIe 3.0 lanes all Threadripper processors offer.

Besides prices, the leak also gives base and boost clocks, and TDP. Both the 2970WX and 2990WX have the same clocks and TDP with a 3.0 GHz base, 4.2 GHz boost, and 250 W TDP. The 2920X and 2950X share the same 3.5 GHz base clock and 180 W (the same as the 1950X) but while the 2920X has a boost clock of 4.3 GHz, the 2950X will boost a bit faster to 4.4 GHz.

Until we know how well these parts may overclock, especially in existing motherboards, these CPUs at these specifications and prices could represent a healthy upgrade for some users. It has been stated that current X399 motherboards should support the new Threadripper CPUs following a BIOS update at stock settings. Increasing the power draw with overclocking might push some boards past their limits. Personally, I am still happy with my 1950X, but that $899 MSRP for the direct upgrade is definitely interesting.

Source: VideoCardz



2nd Generation Threadripper SKUs Apparently Discovered on AMD's Website

Category: CPU's
Posted: July 30, 2018 05:52PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

It looks like the relevant pages have since been taken down, but Reddit user excalibur_zd had spotted on the AMD website support pages for what appear to be the second generation Ryzen Threadripper SKUs. While a completely fake SKU returns a 'Page no found' webpage, when the pages were discovered the results were blank, implying they are placeholders for when these processors are ultimately launched.

In total four different SKUs were found this way, with two making perfect sense; the 2920X and 2950X. The current 1920X and 1950X are the 12-core/24-thread and 16-core/32-thread parts that launched last year. The other two SKUs identified were the 2970WX and 2990WX, which are presumably the 24-core/48-thread and 32-core/64-thread processors shown off at Computex at the beginning of June. The 'W' in the SKU is rather curious though, leading to some speculation about what it could mean. Personally, I favor the idea that the W identifies these processors as using four active dies, as compared to the two active dies in current Threadripper parts. It is by using four active dies that AMD can reach 32 core physical cores, but two of these dies (16 physical cores) will lack direct memory access. Some applications may be sensitive to this while others will not be. The non-W versions, according to this theory, would then still use just two dies that have direct memory access.

Other theories are that the W versions will require water cooling, as the more active dies and active cores will produce so much more heat that air coolers will not be enough. Considering AMD actually showed off the CPUs at Computex running on an air cooler, and then showed off the air cooler, I find this doubtful. I believe the expectation is for these processors to be announced in August, so we will find out soon enough, along with other details, like price.

Source: Reddit/r/AMD



AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990X Listed on CanadaComputers

Category: CPU's
Posted: July 29, 2018 02:10PM
Author: Grilka8050


Ouch! This one isn’t going to be cheap. The AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990X, with 32 Cores and 64 Threads, is now available for $2,399 CAD ($1,850 USD). This confirms the rumored codename “YD299XAZAFWOF”. The listing also suggests that this CPU will ship with the same great packaging that the first-gen Threadripper CPUs used. This one is expensive, but if you can afford it, it will be able to handle ANY task! 

Source: TweakTown




Intel 10nm Systems Will Be Launched For 2019 Holidays

Category: CPU's
Posted: July 29, 2018 01:48PM
Author: Grilka8050


Due to issues with yields, Intel has delayed mass production of their 10nm CPUs until 2019. They just announced that they will be available for purchase during the 2nd half of next year, in time for the holidays. Because the 10nm probably won’t launch until Q4, the 14nm CPUs will still be the primary one used for most of the year. 

Intel’s CEO promised that 10nm datacenter products will be available soon after the 10nm-compatable client systems become available in late 2019. Intel confirmed that the codenamed Ice Lake-SP CPUs may hit the market in Q3 or Q4 of 2020. It might be worth waiting until October-ish to upgrade your CPU, if you can wait that long!

Source: AnandTech



Intel Core 9th Gen Core Series Specs Leaked By Coolaler

Category: CPU's
Posted: July 24, 2018 10:30PM
Author: Grilka8050


With Intel’s 9th Generation series launching soon, rumors are appearing all over the Internet. Coolaler, a reputable publisher of leaks in the past, has just released some rumored specs for the 9th Gen series. If these are legit, they could be really interesting! This leak includes specifications for the Intel Core i9-9900K, i7-9700K, and i5-9600K.

The first Core i9 processor is coming to the non-HEDT platform Z390. It has eight cores,16 threads, and is an unlocked SKU. Intel plans to offer 5 GHz in single and dual-core turbo modes. 

The i7-9700K has eight cores as well, but it does not include Hyper-Threading. The i5-9600K doesn’t have HT either and it is only a six-core processor. All three of these processors are 95W TDP, which is pretty impressive, especially for that i9. The base clock starts at 3.6 GHz and boosts up to 5 GHz. 

So what are your thoughts on these leaked specs? Are they exciting? Unbelievable? Underwhelming?

Source: VideoCardz.com




Specifications for 32 Core Gen 2 Threadripper CPU Possibly Leaked

Category: CPU's
Posted: June 19, 2018 01:47PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

I still maintain that I am very happy with my AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X and do not need to upgrade, but if these rumored specifications are accurate, the temptation to start saving for an upgrade is growing. At Computex 2018, just two weeks ago, AMD showed off an upcoming 32-core/64-thread Threadripper CPU, and according to Anandtech the engineering sample demonstrated had a base frequency of 3.0 GHz and a Turbo of 3.4 GHz. Now, according to HKEPC, this part, which will supposedly be named the Threadripper 2990X, has a base clock of 3.4 GHz and a boost clock of 4.0 GHz across all cores, and 4.20 GHz for fewer cores. These numbers are based on a B2 stepping chip that HKEPC saw tested.

Under a Corsair H150i Pro AIO liquid cooler though, the chip supposedly reached 4.12 GHz across its cores with a voltage of 1.38 V, achieving a score of 6399 in Cinebench R15. That is pretty close to the 7334 score Intel achieved with its 28-core/56-thread CPU overclocked to 5 GHz at the conference. The Threadripper part, however, achieved its score without a one horsepower water chiller and while we do not know how much power it was pulling, I suspect it was less than the 1000 W the Intel processor was potentially drawing.

These numbers are definitely rumor currently, and could end up inaccurate, but it is still fun to imagine 64 threads going at 4 GHz, right? I wonder what a 2950X (what I presume would be the second generation 16-core/32-thread part) would be clocked at?

Source: WCCFtech



Binned and Delidded Intel Core i7-8086K Now Available at Silicon Lottery

Category: CPU's
Posted: June 18, 2018 11:08AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

At Computex 2018, Intel revealed its limited edition Core i7-8086K CPUs, marking the 40th anniversary of the original 8086 processor. It appears the 8086K is already a specially binned version of the i7-8700K, as der8auer discovered at the conference, but this has not stopped Silicon Lottery from binning them again, based on their overclocking potential. Additionally, Silicon Lottery has delidded these CPUs, replacing the stock thermal paste under the IHS with Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut. The fact that Intel uses a thermal paste, or specifically the amount of paste used, has been something the company has come under fire for recently, especially compared to AMD's strategy of soldering most of its Ryzen CPUs. Replacing the stock thermal paste may result in better thermal performance.

The MSRP of the i7-8086K is $425 and it has a base clock of 4.0 GHz with a boost up to 5.0 GHz. The cheapest Silicon Lottery 8086K is $469.99 but has been successfully tested with a multiplier of 50, so overclocked to 5.0 GHz, at a Vcore of 1.400 V. This is the same multiplier/vcore pair as the 8700K offered by Silicon Lottery, though at the price of $429.99. All of the 8086Ks Silicon Lottery tested were able to reach 5 GHz or greater, while only 86% 8700Ks can do the same, and these are at the same settings, remember. Actually, I think comparing these test results might be interesting, so here is a table of them:

Multiplier Vcore (V) 8700K Percentage 8700K Price 8086K Percentage 8086K Price
50 1.400 86 $429.99 100 $469.99
51 1.410 50 $479.99 92 $499.99
52 1.425 17 $689.99 60 $589.99
53 1.435 N/A N/A 14 $859.99

Looking at these results, I wonder how much lower the Vcore could go for some of these 8086Ks.

By the way, it appears AMD is having a little fun with the one-day sweepstakes Intel held, where people could win a Core i7-8086K. Instead of keeping the limited edition CPU, you could instead send it to AMD, getting a Ryzen Threadripper 1950X CPU. Only the first 40 people from the United States to apply for the offer will be offered it.

Source: TweakTown and Silicon Lottery



Intel Announces Core i7 8086K CPU

Category: CPU's
Posted: June 5, 2018 06:42PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*


There were rumors about it back in April and new Intel has announced it will be releasing a limited edition Core i7-8086K CPU for the 40th anniversary of the original 8086 processor.

It is unquestionable the 8086 changed the world as it was the first 16-bit processor and brought about the x86 architecture that long dominated and still influences the computing world. In a way we still see it sued today, the x86 instruction set has changed greatly, with today's processors using x86_64, which AMD developed to bring about 64-bit computing while still supporting the older technology.

The Core i7-8086K will be Intel's first CPU to offer a single-core boost of 5 GHz, but being a K processor, it will be unlocked for overclocking. To get the CPU you can enter a sweepstakes starting 5 PM PDT on June 7. After the 24 hour entry period has closed, 8086 entrants will be randomly chosen to receive one. The second source link is to the sweepstakes webpage.

Source: Intel [1] and [2]




Possible Engineering Sample Zen+ AMD Threadripper Appears in SiSoftware Results

Category: CPU's
Posted: May 10, 2018 06:50AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

If you have found the recently released AMD Ryzen 2000 series CPUs interesting but want more cores and threads to throw at your workloads, we may have just gotten a glimpse of the upcoming Threadripper refresh. Someone spotted over in the SiSoftware database what appear to be the results of an engineering sample for a new 16 core/32 thread part from AMD, which would be the replacement for the Threadripper 1950X. Of course this should be treated as a rumor, and even if it is accurate, engineering samples can differ from the final product, but it does show some interesting specs.

According to the data shown, this CPU had a base clock speed of 3.89 GHz and was using just 116.7 W of power for the multi-core efficiency benchmark. The 1950X has a base clock of 3.4 GHz and boosts to 3.7 GHz, though many users (including myself) have been able to successfully get it up to 4.0 GHz. Perhaps Zen+ will allow it to go even higher. For comparison, Intel's current i9-7960X, another 16 core/32 thread CPU has a base speed of 2.8 GHz but can boost to 4.40 GHz using Turbo Boost Max 3.0.

I have been thoroughly enjoying the power of my 1950X since I got it, and so I doubt I will feel the need to upgrade to this refresh, but I will admit I am very interested in what Precision Boost 2 will do with the 16 cores on two dies. Precision Boost 2 is the technology in the Ryzen 2000 CPUs some reviewers are touting as the reason you do not need to or want to manually overclock the processors. Manually overclocking all of the cores will leave some single-threaded performance untapped, according to their tests, and it will bring up the speed of all cores pretty well too. Applying this across two dies and 16 cores could make for an interesting beast of a processor. (I am still not considering upgrade, but I am now wondering what the price will be for a potential Threadripper 2950X, since the Ryzen 7 2700X was priced below the Ryzen 7 1700X at their respective launches. Of course the $1000 mark for the 1950X is still a great value, so the same price for better performance will be even better.)

Source: SiSoftware



AMD Might Still Launch a Ryzen 7 2800X

Category: CPU's
Posted: April 23, 2018 10:01AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Last week AMD launched its 2nd generation Ryzen CPUs, with the Ryzen 7 2700X at the top of the stack. If you remember the first generation products, you will remember the 1800X had been the top offering, with the 1700X below it. The lack of a 2800X led many to speculate for reasons why, but for AMD it is because the 2700X and Ryzen 7 2700 cover the performance and price points it was aiming for, with these new 8 core/16 thread parts. However, Jim Anderson, Senior Vice President at AMD apparently hinted a 2800X could appear on a later date, depending on Intel's response to the 2700X. Many of the reviews I have seen describe the 2700X as a worthy choice over Intel's Core i7 8700K, because while the 8700K can still offer greater gaming performance, the 2700X is not far behind, and with its addition two cores and four threads, it offers even better performance in multi-threaded workloads.

Source: Tech Power Up



AMD 2nd Gen Ryzen CPUs Available Today

Category: CPU's
Posted: April 19, 2018 10:12AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

The day has finally come and AMD's 2nd Generation Ryzen processors are available worldwide. The new CPUs are the Ryzen 7 2700X, Ryzen 7 2700, Ryzen 5 2600X, and Ryzen 5 2600, with the Ryzen 7 parts being 8 core/16 thread processors and the Ryzen 5 are 6 core/12 thread chips. The MSRPs span from $199 for the Ryzen 5 2600 to just $329 for the Ryzen 7 2700X.

The CPUs are being manufactured on a new 12 nm LP process that should allow for higher clock speeds than the first generation of Ryzen processors, but there are more improvements than this. The Zen+ architecture has increased IPC compared to Zen and has improved cache and memory latencies, Precision Boost 2, and XFR 2 to further improve performance. (Some features require the new X470 chipset, though the CPUs themselves will still work on X370, following a BIOS update.) The Ryzen Master Utility has also seen an update to unlock new overclocking capabilities.

Source: AMD [1] and [2]



Reviews and Overclocking Results Appearing for 2nd Generation Ryzen CPUs

Category: CPU's
Posted: April 16, 2018 12:27PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Despite the embargo on the 2nd Generation Ryzen CPUs ending on Thursday, there has been a lot of information coming out sooner. The outlet El Chapuzas Informatico has been putting up reviews in fact, which VideoCardz has nicely collected and shared as well, with the latest review being of the Ryzen 5 2600 on the X470 platform. This is somewhat interesting as the 2600 was not in the review kits AMD sent out, but instead it was the 2600X and 2700X reviewers were getting. In any case, according to this review, the 2600 was able to reach 4099 MHz on all of its cores using 1.45 V, on the MSI X470 Gaming Pro Carbon motherboard. The memory kits used when testing gaming performance are unfortunately inconsistent across the tests, but graphs show it directly competing with the Core i7 8700K in Doom, even though the Intel CPU had faster RAM (DDR4 3600 compared to DDR4 3200). In both Doom and Battlefield 1 only the i5 8600K with DDR4 3600 came ahead of it by a noticeable amount, which would be a very nice result for a $199 processor.

In a review of the Ryzen 7 2700X, again we see the i5 8600K with DDR4 3600 ahead of the AMD offering in Battlefield 1. In Doom the i7 7800X, i7 8700K, and i5 8600K are all ahead, with the 7800X only leading by 2 FPS. All of the Intel CPUs were using DDR4 3600 while the 2700X was using DDR4 3200. If these and the other results shared are accurate, the Ryzen 7 2700X, and it appears the Ryzen 5 2600, are able to directly challenge some of the best performing Intel CPUs.

Finally, and this does not come from El Chapuzas Informatico, the Ryzen 7 2700X has been overclocked to 5884 MHz, which would be a record for the Ryzen 7 series. A Ryzen 5 1600X has reached 5905 MHz, so that record would still stand, but 5884 MHz is hardly a poor showing.

Just a few days to go before the embargo lifts and more information hits the Internet.

Source: VideoCardz [1] (Ryzen 5 2600 Review), [2] (Ryzen 7 2700X Review), and [3] (5884 MHz OC)



Intel Might Be Making a Core i7 8086K for x86 Anniversary

Category: CPU's
Posted: April 16, 2018 12:02PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

It was 40 years ago when Intel launched its 8086 CPU, a processor that left a deep impact on the whole of the computer industry. Its success led to the rise and dominance of the x86 instruction set that we still use today in the form of x86_64, for 64-bit processors. With this anniversary of its June 1978 release approaching, images have appeared of an Intel Core i7 8086K CPU, and the speculation is it might be a Coffee Lake chip specially binned for high performance.

With the convergence of the anniversary and Intel's current CPU series being the 8000 series making such a product a seemingly perfect fit, it is entirely possible this is a hoax. June is not too far off though, so if it is not a hoax, we may not have long to wait for official statements to that effect.

Source: PCGamesN



Pre-Orders for 2nd Generation AMD Ryzen CPUs Live

Category: CPU's
Posted: April 13, 2018 11:44AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Following the success of the first generation of Ryzen processors from AMD, many have been looking forward to the launch of their successors. Today pre-orders have gone live for the four 2nd generation Ryzen processors that will be available April 19. These CPUs are the 8 core/16 thread Ryzen 7 2700X and 2700, and the 6 core/12 thread Ryzen 5 2600X and 2600. All of the processors will come with an AMD Wraith cooler, though the specific model differs between them.

The 2700X has a base clock of 3.7 GHz and will boost to 4.3 GHz, has a TDP of 105 W and comes with the Wraith Prism cooler for $329. The 2700 cuts back on the clock speeds, to a 3.2 GHz base and 4.1 GHz boost, but its TDP is also at 65 W. The 2700 comes with the Wraith Spire and will cost $299.

The 2600X has a base clock of 3.6 GHz and boosts to 4.2 GHz with a TDP of 95 W. It also comes with a Wraith Spire cooler, but lacks the LEDs, and will only cost $229. At the bottom of the pack is the 2600 with a base clock of 3.4 GHz and boost of 3.9 GHz, a TDP of 65 W, and a Wraith Stealth Cooler. It will only cost you $199.

The AMD X470 chipset will also be launching on April 19 and will be able to utilize some of the new CPUs features the older, but still supported, X370 chipset does not enable. A free download of the AMD StoreMI software is included with the X470 chipset, allowing users to combine high speed and high capacity drives in an easy-to-manage way.

Source: AMD



Ryzen 5 2600 Review Posted Before Launch

Category: CPU's
Posted: April 9, 2018 11:34AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

With the great success of AMD's Ryzen 1000 processors, many have been looking forward to the launch of its successors, the Ryzen 2000 series of CPUs that are to launch sometime this month. Though we are not yet to the release date, some information is leaking out, including a review by El Chapuzas Informatico of the Ryzen 5 2600, which VideoCardz found and shared some of. While this second generation 6 core/12 thread part does show some nice if only moderate improvements from the Ryzen 5 1600, the tests have some issues with them. For one thing, they were done on an X370 motherboard so X470-exclusive performance-improving features are not present, and the platform was not completely stable for gaming tests. As the release date approaches we will hopefully see more reviews more representative of the consumer platform.

Also shared by VideoCardz is a video from AMD's YouTube channel looking back at the Ryzen processors, one year after release. Something mentioned in the video is that work has already begun on the Zen 5 CPU architecture, which will follow the Zen 3 design. Both Zen 2 and Zen 3 will be 7 nm designs and Zen 2 will be the company's first CPU with a fix for the Spectre vulnerabilities, but there are limited details beyond these. If you are wondering what happened to Zen 4, apparently four is often skipped due its unlucky meaning in Chinese culture. The earliest VideoCardz speculates we might see Zen 5 launch is 2021, since Zen 3 is supposed to release in 2020.

Source: VideoCardz [1] and [2]



Intel Apparently Not Patching Some Old CPUs for Spectre V2 Protection

Category: CPU's
Posted: April 4, 2018 04:00PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

After their public reveals in January, a number of companies, including Intel, have been working on mitigations and protections against the Meltdown and two Spectre vulnerabilities. All three attacks take advantage of how a performance improving feature built into CPUs work but there are software and firmware solutions to at least reduce the vulnerability to these attacks, if not completely stop such attacks. While Intel has already release microcode updates for a number of its processors, it looks like some of its older chips will not be seeing these updates. The good news is the newest of these processors went on sale in 2011, so it is only older systems that will not receive these updates.

It is only protection against the Spectre Variant 2 attack that has been stopped, and only for chips in the Bloomfield Xeon, Clarksfield, Gulftown, and Yorkfield families. The reasons giving for these stops include it being impractical to implement these changes due to micro-architectural characteristics, limited ecosystem support, and that many customers use these machines in a closed system, making it less likely for them to be exposed to a threat. However, there are microcode updates for Spectre v1 and Meltdown, and Meltdown was a very serious threat given the ease with which it could be exploited.

Source: The Inquirer



Specs and Pricing for Intel 8th Gen Core Coffeelake-S CPUs Revealed

Category: CPU's
Posted: April 3, 2018 05:06PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Information for Intel's 8th Gen Core CPUs using Coffeelake-S have been revealed now and VideoCardz has put together a nice chart for them and four chipsets. Starting from the top, the Core i7-8700T is a 35 W processor but will have 6 cores/12 threads running with a base clock of 2.4 GHz and a boost of 4.0 GHz, costing some $303. Stepping down to the Core i5 we still have six cores but only six threads and the i5-8600 leads this pack with a base clock of 3.1 GHz and a boost of 4.3 GHz at a 65 W TDP and $213 price. The i5-8600T has lower base and boost clocks, 2.3 GHz and 3.7 GHz, but a 35 W TDP, which is likely why it also has the same $213 price to it. The i5-8500 and 8500T are a pair that also share the same price, but the 8500 has a 65 W TDP for its 3.0 GHz/4.1 GHz base/boost clocks while the 35 W TDP of the 8500T has 2.1 GHz/3.5 GHz for its clocks. At the bottom of the i5 range is the i5-8400T with its 1.7 GHz base, 3.3 GHz boost, and 35 W TDP for a price of $182. Coffeelake-S is also in three i3 processors and all are 4 core/4 thread parts. The 8300 has a base clock of 3.7 GHz with a 62W TDP and $138 price, while the same-priced 8300T has a base clock of 3.2 GHz and a 35 W TDP. At the very bottom is the 8100T and its 3.1 GHz base clock, 35 W TDP, and $117 price.

For chipsets we have the H370, H310, and B360 targeting consumers and the Q370 targeting corporate users, though the H370 and B360 also aim at corporations. The H370 has 20 PCIe lanes, the B360 has 12, and the H310 has 6 while the Q370 offers up to 24. The H370 and Q370 chipsets both offer 30 high speed I/O lines and a total of 14 USB ports, though the Q370 can support 10 USB 3.1 ports while the H370 only offers up to 8. The B360 has 24 high speed lines and 12 total USB ports while the H310 comes in at 14 high speed lines and 10 USB ports.

Source: VideoCardz



Intel Releases Status Update on Spectre and Meltdown Fixes and Coming Hardware Changes

Category: CPU's
Posted: March 16, 2018 09:44AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

It was back in January that the news of the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities were first reported and since then many companies have been working to protect against potential attacks. Most of these solutions have been in software, which can be enough and can be developed quickly, but since the original release, hardware-level fixes have been discussed for finally blocking potential attacks.

Intel, which was the only company with products susceptible to Meltdown and both variants of Spectre, recently stated it has released new microcode for all of its products from the past five years that were vulnerable to these side-channel attacks. Naturally this means you must install these updates to protect your system. To provide even more protection against the second variant of Spectre and against Meltdown, Intel has also developed hardware design changes and these will be present in its next generation Intel Xeon Scalable processors, which have the code name Cascade Lake, and in 8thsignificant performance penalties for some workloads.

 

 

Source: Intel



Specs and Performance Data Found for Upcoming AMD Ryzen 2000 CPUs

Category: CPU's
Posted: March 15, 2018 08:29AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Last week slides claiming to contain specification and pricing information about AMD's upcoming Ryzen 2000 series processors appeared on the Internet, and now it appears some of this information is accurate as some of the CPUs are also appearing in benchmark databases. Over at Geekbench, the Ryzen 5 2600X and Ryzen 7 2700X have been spotted, showing 3.6 GHz and 3.7 GHz base clocks respectively. The single-core performance was 4781 and 4736 for the 2600X and 2700X respectively, while the multi-core score gives the 8 core/16 thread CPU a clear lead at 25,195 compared to the 22,235 score of the 6 core/12 thread processor. It might be worth noting different speed RAM was used between these tests, so they are not apples-to-apples, and both motherboards reported as using the X370 chipset, so the performance-improving features expected of the X470 chipset were not present.

Geekbench is hardly the only benchmark out there and people have found entries for the 2700X and 2700 (non-X) in the 3DMark database. The scores here are not necessarily as useful as you would hope due to the memory speed and configuration used, but the maximum turbo clock is shown as 4 GHz for the 2700 and 4.35 GHz for the 2700X, with the 2700 also having a base clock of 3.2 GHz. For the most part this all aligns with last week's leak.

Also found recently is the Ryzen 5 2600 in the SiSoft database, where it is identified as having a turbo clock of 3.9 GHz.

Source: VideoCardz



Several Security Flaws Reported in AMD Processors and Chipset

Category: CPU's
Posted: March 13, 2018 11:11AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Earlier today a number of security vulnerabilities were revealed in various AMD CPUs and the Promontory chipset, though not technically disclosed, by CTS, a cyber-security company, at the AMDFlaws.com website. Some of these involve compromising the Secure Processor built into some processors, allowing malicious code to exist at a level invisible to the operating system. There are a total of 13 vulnerabilities, according to CTS, falling under four groups it has named Masterkey, Ryzenfall, Fallout, and Chimera. According to the whitepaper, there are no known mitigations for any of these attacks but, well, there are some questions about the validity of these vulnerabilities and how their disclosure today has been handled.

Typically when a security vulnerability is found, it is reported to the effected company 90 days before it is published, and sometimes this period is extended. AMD however was only notified of these claims yesterday, so AMD has had little time to investigate the issues or identify any mitigations. Also, while these issues may compromise the security of a Zen-based computer, to even attack the vulnerabilities is not going to be trivial. In the case of Masterkey, a specially crafted BIOS would need to be flashed to exploit a vulnerability in the Secure Processor and place malware code within the ARM Cortex A5 processor that is inside the Secure Processor. Ryzenfall, Fallout, and Chimera all require local-machine elevated administrator privileges to run a program and a digitally signed driver to access the Secure Processor. Chimera specifically goes after the Promontory chipset, which was created by ASMedia and not AMD directly, and CTS is pointing out security issues ASMedia has had as the basis for this vulnerability. The only footnote about these vulnerabilities is the FTC penalizing ASUSTek, of which ASMedia is a subsidiary, because of vulnerabilities in routers.

Only time will tell how serious any of these issues might be, especially as AMD begins its investigation into the vulnerabilities, along with other security researchers.

Source: AMDFlaws.com, Phoronix, and AMD



AMD CPU Desktop Platform Roadmap Apparently Leaked

Category: CPU's
Posted: March 8, 2018 09:37AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Yesterday saw the leaking of potential pricing and specification information for the upcoming AMD Ryzen 2000-series of CPUs, but that was not the only AMD leak of the day. This one apparently came from a special event for retailers and distributors and shows the desktop CPU architecture roadmap to 2020, covering CPUs, APUs, and HEDT CPUs.

The start of the roadmap is 2017, so it shows us some information we are already familiar with, but some of the 2019 and 2020 names are new, as is the description of the release cycle. According to the roadmap, 2019 will see the release of Matisse, the Zen 2 AM4 CPU, Picasso, the AM4 APU, and Castle Peak for the HEDT CPU. In 2020 the AM4 CPU launched will be Vermeer and the AM4 APU will be Renoir. The HEDT CPU for 2020 does not have a codename here and is labeled as just NG HEDT. Beneath the road map the yearly releases are marked as being Inflection releases, meaning a new fabrication process and new CPU core, or Optimization coming from process maturity and efficiency enhancements. The Inflection releases follow what we already know, with 2017 and 2019 both labeled as such (the releases of the Zen and Zen 2 architectures), and the Optimization for this year agrees with the Zen+ release coming next month. The Optimization mark for 2020 makes sense too, just following a cycle of introducing new technology and then refining it before the next major introduction.

Another leaked slide shows the lineup for the upcoming Pinnacle Ridge SKUs, though at least one aspect of it is a little curious. According to this slide, there will not be a Ryzen 7 2800X CPU and the Ryzen 7 2700X will fill the slot for both the 1700X and 1800X. I have been seeing some comments that removing the x800X SKU makes sense as a means to reduce confusion between three top-of-the-line parts. What is a little odd though is the label above the 2000-series CPUs: 2H 2018. The current expectation or hope is these processors will be launching next month, which would be Q2 and still in the first half of the year. The slide does also say "Schedule subject to change" but we will have to wait and see what happens.

Source: VideoCardz



Ryzen 2000 Specs and Pricing Possibly Leaked

Category: CPU's
Posted: March 7, 2018 09:38AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Next month is when the Zen+ based and 12 nm fabricated Ryzen 2000 series of CPUs from AMD are supposed to launch, but it appears a lot of information about them has leaked out. Like all leaks, these should be considered rumors and not completely trustworthy, but time will tell, and it might not even be long. The leak comes as slides from and in the lower left corner the NDA information is stated, including the embargo date of March 15, which means, if this is true, we might see it confirmed just next week.

On to the details which show four Ryzen 2000 CPUs launching: 2600; 2600X, 2700; and 2700X. Like the 1000 series, the 2600(X) CPUs are 6 core/12 thread parts while the 2700(X) are 8 core/16 thread parts but they all come with a cooler, something that was not the case for the X-series CPUs before. You might notice the lack of a Ryzen 7 2800X, replacing the top-binned 1800X, which is fueling some speculation about when it might appear and what its specifications will be. According to the slides, the 2700X will have a base clock of 3.7 GHz and a boost of 4.35 GHz with a TDP of 105 W. Its price will be $369 while the 2700 will cost $299, have a base clock of 3.2 GHz and a boost of 4.1 GHz in its 65 W TDP. Naturally the 2600 and 2600X come in cheaper at $199 and $249 respectively, along with base clocks of 3.4 GHz and 3.6 GHz with boosts of 3.9 GHz and 4.25 GHz respectively. The TDPs for these two chips are 65 W and 95 W, with the 2600X naturally being the higher power part.

The 2000 series offers more than just higher speeds but also other internal improvements, such as Precision Boost 2, which has been talked about before. Precision Boost is meant to increase the clock speed of a CPU's cores depending on the workload and situation with Precision Boost 2 being able to do so at a finer level, extracting more performance from the chip. Also XFR 2 will push the CPUs to higher speeds, based on the chip's temperature, but the X-series processors have more than these two technologies to improve performance. Precision Boost Overdrive and XFR 2 Enhanced will bring the speeds even higher for these CPUs, but only on the X470 and B450 chipsets. If you want these features, you will need one of the newer motherboards and not one of the current 300-series motherboards with a BIOS update.

Also among the slides are a couple comparing performance between the 2700X and either the 1800X or Intel Core i7-8700K. According to these slides, the 2700X is on average just 7.7% below the 8700K in performance, at 1080P ultra with a GTX 1080, and on average 5% faster than the 1800X.

Personally I am looking forward to March 15, to see if these slides come out officially and what other information might come with them.

Source: VideoCardz



Intel Releases New Code to Protect Some CPUs from Spectre

Category: CPU's
Posted: February 28, 2018 01:23PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Ever since the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities were publicly revealed, Intel has been having a hard time. Meltdown is an Intel-only vulnerability and its fix can severely degrade performance, in some scenarios, and then when they first released microcode updates to protect against Spectre, some systems experienced stability issues. More specifically it was systems using the older Broadwell and Haswell CPU architectures, but now it looks like the company has released stable updates, without the instability issue. Broadwell CPUs with IDs 50662, 50663, 50664, 40671, 406F1, 306D4, and 40671 and Haswell versions 306C3, 4066, 306F2, 40651, and 306C3. This information comes from a Microcode Revision Guidance document (pdf), which The Inquirer has already read through and pulled out some useful information from.

If you are running Sandy Bridge of Ivy Bridge CPUs, their updates are apparently still marked as in beta and are being tested by hardware partners. Many other processors, including Bloomfield, Clarksfield, and Wolfsdale CPUs, are only listed as 'planning' though, so if you are using any of these chips, you appear to have a bit longer to wait. The newer Skylake platform was patched earlier this month.

Source: The Inquirer



AMD Providing Boot Kits with Old APU to Update BIOS for Ryzen APUs

Category: CPU's
Posted: February 19, 2018 08:37AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Last week saw the release of AMD's Ryzen Desktop APUs, which combine the Zen cores of Ryzen CPUs with a Vega GPU. As we have known since before the launch of the Ryzen CPUs last year, these APUs would use the same AM4 socket as the CPUs, which means they could be dropped into existing AM4 motherboards and work fine, naturally following a BIOS update. While this is a very nice feature of the Ryzen platform, it hit a serious snag as consumers installed their new APU in their motherboard to find it would not boot. While all it takes is a BIOS update to fix the problem, not all motherboards allow a new BIOS to be flashed without a bootable processor installed, along with a GPU so you can see what you are doing. Luckily, AMD has a solution.

If this happens to you, and you do not have a friend you can borrow a CPU (and possibly a GPU) from, you can go through AMD support to have a boot kit sent to you, and part of the kit is an A6-9500, dual core APU. This is an older and slow APU but also uses the AM4 socket, so you can drop it in, update the BIOS, then pull it out and stick your new Ryzen APU in. Once this is done, AMD does want you to send the A6-9500 APU back, but according to Ars Technia, you can keep the heatsink it comes with. Not sure what you can do with the heatsink, as it is not compatible with Ryzen parts, but maybe you can still find something fun to do with it. (I like using the old aluminum block I have from a Phenom II 720 BE heatsink whenever I need to demonstrate heating and cooling.)

Source: Ars Technica and AMD



Intel Releases Microcode Update for Skylake CPUs Protecting Against Spectre

Category: CPU's
Posted: February 8, 2018 09:12AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

At the beginning of the year the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities were revealed to the public, along with the efforts of various companies to patch the issues. This patching effort has continued ever since and now Intel has announced it released production microcode updates to its industry partners and OEM customers. This microcode will be used to create firmware updates for the Skylake platform. The microcode updates for other platforms are still in beta, allowing for additional testing for being ready for production release. Intel stresses the importance of keeping your system up to date to keep it safe from malicious attacks, such as these side-channel attacks.

Remember it was very recently revealed that a number of attacks based on Spectre and Meltdown have been showing up. While these malware samples are still young, they exist because people are trying to discover how to exploit the vulnerabilities.

Source: Intel



Intel CPUs Outselling AMD at German E-Tailer Mindfactory.de

Category: CPU's
Posted: February 6, 2018 02:21PM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

When AMD launched its Ryzen processors last year, they were recognized as a return of competition to the CPU market, which Intel had long dominated. This led to AMD actually outselling Intel as people sought the high thread count at affordable prices, but it appears AMD's reign has ended, at least at one e-tailer. Mindfactory.de is Germany's largest online retailer and has been sharing its sales data, which is how we know AMD got ahead of Intel, and now the data shows Intel ahead again at 58% to AMD's 42%. While Intel has represented the majority of sales now, there are some important points to the data's context.

Perhaps the most important piece of contextual information is the upcoming launch of the Ryzen 2000 series based on the Zen+ architecture. As promising and powerful as the Zen architecture proved to be with the Ryzen 1000 series of CPUs, there are a number of improvements expected and already announced for its successor, including support for faster RAM. Those following news from AMD are likely holding off on CPU purchases until the Ryzen 2000 series and accompanying x470 chipset release. Another point WCCFtech makes, that is rather interesting to me at least, is AMD's dominance in between the HEDT platforms. While the Ryzen Threadripper/x399 platform is not exactly cheap compared to the entry-level Intel HEDT parts, it offers many useful features, like 64 PCIe lanes off the CPU and better price-per-core than Intel's higher core count chips.

Time will tell how long this sales lead will last, and the Ryzen 2000 series and x470 platform is expected to launch in April.

Source: WCCFtech



EPYC Installed in TR4 Socket with Some Success

Category: CPU's
Posted: January 29, 2018 11:36AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

Since before its launch even, the Threaderipper HEDT CPUs from AMD have been of great interest for the power and features the platform offers, and their similarities to AMD's EPYC processors. For example, both Threadripper and EPYC show four Zeppelin dies if you remove the heat spreader, as der8auer did back in September. Even before his video, there were some speculating if Threadripper and EPYC CPUs, with their similar TR4 and SP3 sockets, could be installed in systems meant for the other. Now der8auer is at it again, actually installing an EPYC CPU in the ASUS Zenith Extreme x399 motherboard, and showing the results in a YouTube video.

As this was only meant as a test, der8auer did not install a CPU cooler or even a GPU, but thanks to the motherboard's built-in OLED screen he could still watch for what the system was doing. Initially the system would not boot with EPYC, but after covering what appears to be an ID pin, distinguishing EPYC and Threadripper processors, the system actually powered up. If you are hoping to see a 32 core/64 thread EPYC in a consumer motherboard though, the success is limited. The system consistently crashes when while checking the memory, but der8auer speculates a proper EPYC BIOS could make this viable, though to a point.

While it might become possible to fully boot up EPYC on a TR4 motherboard, two of the dies will suffer from very high latencies because they will not have direct access to RAM. Each Zeppelin die has its own memory controller supporting dual-channel memory setups, and with Threadripper having two active dies, it supports quad-channel, while EPYC with four dies supports eight-channel memory. With TR4/x399 being a quad channel platform, two of the EPYC dies would need to go through the other dies to access memory, resulting in a latency penalty.

 

 

Source: der8auer YouTube



Possible Ryzen 2600 CPU Appears on SiSoftware Website

Category: CPU's
Posted: January 18, 2018 08:36AM
Author: Guest_Jim_*

From AMD's pre-CES 2018 event we know the next generation of Ryzen CPUs will be launching in April. These processors will feature the more refined Zen+ architecture and will be manufactured on a 12 nm process that should offer improved performance over the current 14 nm parts. With release coming soon, we are starting to see some information leak out and what we have here is a listing on the SiSoftware website for the AMD Ryzen ZD2600BBM68AF_38/34_Y.

While the ID does have 2600 right at the beginning, this is not necessarily the successor to the Ryzen 5 1600, though it does also offer 6 cores/12 threads. According to the site, the CPU has a speed of 3.4 GHz, and looking at the ID number it would seem the boost speed might be 3.8 GHz. This CPU is possibly an engineering sample so we could see different clock speeds in the final product.

In addition to revealing this CPU, the SiSoftware information also identifies the ASUS ROG Crosshair VII Hero, the likely x470 successor to the x370 ROG Crosshair VI Hero. No specific information is offered on this, except that it too exists in a state ready for testing but as April approach, more information is sure to appear for more second-generation Ryzen CPUs and x470 motherboards.

Source: SiSoftware



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